Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bronchitis and pneumonia cases rise as temps and humidity soar

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bronchitis and pneumonia cases rise as temps and humidity soar

    Bronchitis and pneumonia cases rise as temps and humidity soar
    By John Paul (jpaul@wsbt.com)

    By Jason Overholt

    Story Created: Jul 7, 2010 at 7:44 PM EDT

    (Story Updated: Jul 7, 2010 at 7:47 PM EDT )

    GRANGER Doctors say high mold and pollen counts have led to an increase in the number of cases of pneumonia and bronchitis. These are two respiratory illnesses doctors don't usually see until the winter months. They say infection counts are similar to levels during flu season.

    -snip-

    "Cases of upper respiratory and bronchitis have gone through the roof," said Dr. Modupe Popoola, medical director of the Medpoint Urgent Care Center. "The volume of patients that we have seen is almost comparable to the flu season, which is kind of surprising."

    And the increase in respiratory cases for infants and toddlers are also prevalent. Doctors at Medpoint have noticed the increase as pollen and mold counts, along with heavy rains, made people sick this summer.

    "This is more indicative of the winter and very early spring," said Popoola. "I can't believe we are seeing these kinds of numbers."


    continues at; http://www.wsbt.com/news/local/Bronc...-97984709.html
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

  • #2
    Re: Bronchitis and pneumonia cases rise as temps and humidity soar

    Spring rains and high pollen and mold counts are causing a spike in respiratory illnesses in early summer, doctors say.

    Dr. Steven Elliott of Evansville says he has averaged almost one patient a day with pneumonia and about six a day with bronchitis, which is rare for this time of year.

    -snip-

    The weather conditions also have led to a spike in respiratory viral infections in infants. Dr. Michael Verive of St. Mary's Hospital for Women and Children in Evansville says he saw young babies wind up on ventilators as a result.

    more at; http://www.wndu.com/indiana/headlines/97795314.html
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

    Comment

    Working...
    X