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US, Minnesota - Highly Pathogenic H5N2 strain in turkey flock in Pope County - first finding in the Mississippi flyway - restarts

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  • US, Minnesota - Highly Pathogenic H5N2 strain in turkey flock in Pope County - first finding in the Mississippi flyway - restarts

    Authorities 'prepare for the worst' as lethal strain of bird flu spreads east wiping out 15,000 turkeys on ONE farm

    • Authorities in Minnesota are preparing for the worst and hoping for the best as a deadly strain of bird flu wipes out a flock of 15,000 turkeys
    • It is the same strain of H5N2 that has been found in wild birds across Washington, Oregon and Idaho
    • Only 100 birds were left alive less than a week from the first deaths were reported
    • Officials stress that the risk to humans is low and no infections from this strain have been detected anywhere
    By ASSOCIATED PRESS and OLIVER O'CONNELL FOR MAILONLINE
    PUBLISHED: 01:13 GMT, 6 March 2015 | UPDATED: 07:02 GMT, 6 March 2015


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz3TaosRGlx
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
    A deadly strain of bird flu has spread East and been found in a Minnesota commercial turkey flock wiping out 15,000 birds, as authorities stress there is no danger to the general public.
    ?Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights ? that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

  • #2
    USDA Confirms H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial Turkey Flock in Minnesota

    First Finding in the Mississippi Flyway

    The United States Department of Agriculture?s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza in a commercial turkey flock in Pope County, Minnesota. This is the first finding in the Mississippi flyway. It is the same strain of avian influenza that has been confirmed in backyard and wild birds in Washington, Oregon and Idaho as part of the ongoing incident in the Pacific flyway. Samples from the turkey breeder replacement flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding.

    APHIS is partnering closely with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and the remaining birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the involved flock will not enter the food system. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks, and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with these viruses have been detected at this time. The Minnesota Department of Health is working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure they are taking the proper precautions. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

    Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area, following existing avian influenza response plans. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations. USDA will be informing OIE and international trading partners of this finding. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts.

    OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern. These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and to report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA?s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov


    Additional background: Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese, and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or ?H? proteins, of which there are 16 (H1?H16), and neuraminidase or ?N? proteins, of which there are 9 (N1?N9). Many different combinations of ?H? and ?N? proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)? the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

    The H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses. USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the H5N2 virus and new H5N1 virus. The new H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the H5N1 virus found in Asia, Europe and Africa that has caused some human illness. Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    None of these viruses have been identified in humans, nor are expected to pose a public health risk. For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incident visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page.
    ?Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights ? that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

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    • #3
      Officials, U monitoring bird flu cases

      ByEthan Nelson March 23, 2015

      ...
      State animal health officials finished preliminary testing last week and found no recent deaths related to the disease. Officials have struggled to grasp the disease?s source, and its peculiar spread across the country has further complicated identifying the cause.

      Raptor Center executive director Julia Ponder said waterfowl could have carried the strain of influenza if they migrated to the Midwest ? which is difficult to determine, as it isn?t migration season yet.
      ...
      ?This is a virus that is absolutely new,? she said. ?How it got to a subzero Minnesota in early March is hard to say.?
      ...
      Forty countries have banned turkey imports from Minnesota, the country?s largest turkey producer, to protect their own flocks.
      ...
      The Minnesota Board of Animal Health closed 31 backyard turkey farms in western Minnesota this month.

      The board, along with University researchers, began a second round of testing over the weekend.
      ...

      http://www.mndaily.com/news/metro-st...bird-flu-cases
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        APNewsBreak: 1st Midwest Farm Hit by Bird Flu Restarts

        By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSJUNE 9, 2015, 2:29 P.M. E.D.T.

        MINNEAPOLIS ? Three months after a devastating form of bird flu made its first appearance in the Midwest, the first poultry farm in the region to be affected is growing turkeys again ? even though the virus is still lurking in Minnesota and beyond.

        The Pope County farm was restocked with new birds Sunday, Dr. Dale Lauer, an assistant director with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, told The Associated Press.

        It's the first affected farm in the country's top turkey producing state to reach the milestone of resuming production. A few other farms that were among the earliest to see the H5N2 virus will be restocked by next week, he said.

        "We're hoping to get these premises repopulated and back up and running and on the road to recovery," Lauer said.

        The farm's turkeys started dying in late February, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture on March 4 identified the culprit as the H5N2 virus, All 44,000 birds there died from the virus or were culled to prevent its spread.
        ...

        http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015...ocks.html?_r=0
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment

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