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Kansas - USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Backyard Flock in Leavenworth County

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  • Kansas - USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Backyard Flock in Leavenworth County

    Kansas Department of Agriculture monitoring for signs of Avian Influenza

    MANHATTAN, Kansas – The Kansas Department of Agriculture (KDA) is currently monitoring a control zone in Southeast Kansas, including areas of Cherokee and Crawford counties, after a confirmed case of the H5N2 strain of Avian Influenza was found in Jasper County, Missouri near Asbury.

    Avian Influenza is a contagious, rapidly spreading viral disease affecting birds. Outbreaks of a strain of avian influenza have occurred in Missouri, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho and are not considered to be a threat to public health or the food supply.

    Dr. Bill Brown, State Animal Health Commissioner, confirmed that a response team from KDA’s Division of Animal Health and from USDA has been dispatched to the area to conduct surveillance activities. “It is important to know where backyard flocks of poultry exist. We have also been in contact with commercial poultry farmers in the region.” Avian Influenza exists naturally in many wild birds and can be transmitted by contact with infected animals or ingestion of infected food or water.

    “We are dedicated to providing the necessary assistance and precautions to avoid any possible spreading of the disease,” Brown said. Symptoms in poultry include coughing, sneezing, respiratory distress, decreased egg production and sudden death.

    KDA is seeking assistance from backyard poultry owners in the Crawford and Cherokee County Regions. If you currently own poultry, the agency is requesting you self-report your backyard flock. This will assist animal health officials in helping to monitor the situation and control the spread of this disease. If you own poultry, please contact the KDA Division of Animal Health at 785-564-6601.

    Though extremely rare, humans can contract Avian Influenza. It is thought that infection results from contact with contaminated poultry or surfaces. Symptoms range from flu-like symptoms to eye infections, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress. If you have symptoms and believe that you have come into contact with infected animals or consumed infected meat, contact your health care provider immediately.

    If you suspect your flock has contracted the disease, quarantine the affected animals immediately. Also, be sure to restrict traffic on and off your farm and thoroughly disinfect any material leaving the farm such as tires, equipment and clothing. No effective treatment for the disease has been found. Infected animals must be humanely destroyed and disposed of properly to prevent the disease from spreading.

    Although vaccines are available, they are not commonly used because no vaccine covers all 15 strains of the disease. For additional information, please contact the Kansas Department of Agriculture. Prevention is the best way to combat Avian Influenza. Keep wild birds away from your home or farm, and stay informed about the health of neighboring animals.
    For more information please check www.agriculture.ks.gov/avianinfluenza

    http://agriculture.ks.gov/AllNewsIte...vian-influenza

    http://agriculture.ks.gov/

    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Kansas quarantines two counties due to Missouri bird flu

    CHICAGO Thu Mar 12, 2015 6:32pm EDT

    (Reuters) - Kansas on Thursday said it was prohibiting the movement of poultry into or out of two counties in a bid to protect its livestock from bird flu found in neighboring Missouri.

    The quarantines in Cherokee and Crawford countries, which are on the Missouri border, will last until further notice and at least 30 days, according to a statement from the Kansas Department of Agriculture.

    ...
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/...0M82SD20150312
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Backyard Flock in Kansas

      CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.

      WASHINGTON, March 13, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a backyard chicken and duck flock in Leavenworth County, Kansas. This is the first finding of HPAI in the Central flyway. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

      Samples from the flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. APHIS is working closely with the Kansas Department of Agriculture to respond to the finding. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses. As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area.

      The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations. USDA will be informing the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as well as international trading partners of this finding. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern. These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife.

      If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds. All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.

      Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.
      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

      Comment


      • #4


        Leavenworth County
        Location in the state of Kansas

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leavenworth_County,_Kansas
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Kansas Department of Agriculture notified of confirmed positive case of Avian Influenza



        MANHATTAN, Kansas – The Kansas Department of Agriculture was notified late Friday afternoon that samples collected from a backyard poultry flock containing both chickens and ducks in Leavenworth County returned a presumptive positive result for highly pathogenic avian influenza at the National Veterinary Services Lab.

        MANHATTAN, Kansas – The Kansas Department of Agriculture was notified late Friday afternoon that samples collected from a backyard poultry flock containing both chickens and ducks in Leavenworth County returned a presumptive positive result for highly pathogenic avian influenza at the National Veterinary Services Lab.

        KDA will be establishing a control zone around the premise. This case is in addition to the areas of Cherokee and Crawford counties that are under surveillance after a confirmed case of the H5N2 strain of Avian Influenza was found in Jasper County, Missouri near Asbury earlier in the week.

        Avian Influenza is a contagious, rapidly spreading viral disease affecting birds. Outbreaks of a strain of avian influenza have occurred in Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho and are not considered to be a threat to public health or the food supply.

        Dr. Bill Brown, State Animal Health Commissioner, confirmed that a response team from KDA’s Division of Animal Health and from USDA will be dispatched to the area to conduct surveillance activities and to collect additional sample from flocks within the control zone. “It is important to know where backyard flocks of poultry exist. We will be seeking information about the presence of backyard flocks in Leavenworth County.”

        Avian Influenza exists naturally in many wild birds and can be transmitted by contact with infected animals or ingestion of infected food or water. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

        “We are dedicated to providing the necessary assistance and precautions to avoid any possible spreading of the disease,” Brown said. Symptoms in poultry include coughing, sneezing, respiratory distress, decreased egg production and sudden death.

        KDA is seeking assistance from backyard poultry owners in Leavenworth County. If you currently own poultry, the agency is requesting you self-report your backyard flock. This will assist animal health officials in helping to monitor the situation and control the spread of this disease. Please email information about the location and type of backyard flock in Leavenworth County to HPAI@KDA.KS.GOV. You may also contact the KDA Division of Animal Health at 785-564-6601.

        If you suspect your flock has contracted the disease, quarantine the affected animals immediately. Also, be sure to restrict traffic on and off your farm and thoroughly disinfect any material leaving the farm such as tires, equipment and clothing. No effective treatment for the disease has been found. Infected animals must be humanely destroyed and disposed of properly to prevent the disease from spreading.

        Although vaccines are available, they are not commonly used because no vaccine covers all 15 strains of the disease. Prevention is the best way to combat Avian Influenza. Keep wild birds away from your home or farm, and stay informed about the health of neighboring animals.
        Additional information will be made available on Monday, March 16.

        For more information please check www.agriculture.ks.gov/avianinfluenza

        http://agriculture.ks.gov/news-event...vian-influenza
        Last edited by Pathfinder; March 14th, 2015, 12:21 PM. Reason: Added map
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Kansas Department of Agriculture News Releases

          All news

          Kansas Department of Agriculture notified of confirmed positive case of Avian Influenza

          The Kansas Department of Agriculture was notified late Friday afternoon that samples collected from a backyard poultry flock containing both chickens and ducks in Leavenworth County was positive for HPAI H5N2.

          MANHATTAN, Kansas – The Kansas Department of Agriculture was notified late Friday afternoon that samples collected from a backyard poultry flock containing both chickens and ducks in Leavenworth County was positive for HPAI H5N2. The flock was depopulated on Saturday morning by USDA officials.

          KDA is establishing an incident command post in Leavenworth County, and as a part of the disease control and eradication protocol, a control zone has been established around the premise. KDA employees have begun survey work within the control zone to determine locations of backyard poultry flocks.

          KDA is seeking assistance from backyard poultry owners in Leavenworth County. If you currently own poultry, the agency is requesting you self-report your backyard flock. This will assist animal health officials in helping to monitor the situation and control the spread of this disease. Please email information about the location and type of backyard flock in Leavenworth County to HPAI@KDA.KS.GOV. You may also contact the KDA Division of Animal Health toll free at (844) 255-7794.

          Avian Influenza is a contagious, rapidly spreading viral disease affecting birds. Outbreaks of a strain of avian influenza have occurred in Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Idaho and are not considered to be a threat to public health or the food supply.
          Avian Influenza exists naturally in many wild birds and can be transmitted by contact with infected animals or ingestion of infected food or water. The Center for Disease Control considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

          “We are dedicated to providing the necessary assistance and precautions to avoid any possible spreading of the disease,” Dr. Bill Brown Kansas Animal Health Commissioner said.

          Symptoms in poultry include coughing, sneezing, respiratory distress, decreased egg production and sudden death.
          If you suspect your flock has contracted the disease, quarantine the affected animals immediately. Infected animals must be humanely destroyed and disposed of properly to prevent the disease from spreading.

          Although vaccines are available, they are not commonly used because no vaccine covers all 15 strains of the disease. Prevention is the best way to combat Avian Influenza. Keep wild birds away from your home or farm, and stay informed about the health of neighboring animals.

          For more information please check www.agriculture.ks.gov/avianinfluenza

          http://agriculture.ks.gov/news-event...vian-influenza


          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Highly pathogenic avian influenza,
            United States of America
            Information received on 20/03/2015 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
            Summary
            Report type Follow-up report No. 9
            Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
            Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/12/2014
            Report date 20/03/2015
            Date submitted to OIE 20/03/2015
            Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
            Date of previous occurrence 2004
            Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
            Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
            Serotype H5N2
            Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
            This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
            Related reports Immediate notification (16/12/2014)
            Follow-up report No. 1 (07/01/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 2 (13/01/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 3 (22/01/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 4 (03/02/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 5 (17/02/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 6 (24/02/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 7 (06/03/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 8 (12/03/2015)
            Follow-up report No. 9 (20/03/2015)
            New outbreaks (1)
            Outbreak 1 (31) Leavenworth County, Leavenworth, KANSAS
            Date of start of the outbreak 05/03/2015
            Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
            Epidemiological unit Backyard
            Affected animals
            Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
            Birds 21 8 13 0
            Affected population The affected premises was a small backyard poultry flock of chickens and ducks that had exposure to wild ducks.
            Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 1
            Total animals affected
            Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
            Birds 21 ** 8 13 0
            Outbreak statistics
            Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
            Birds ** 38.10% ** 100.00%
            *Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
            **Not calculated because of missing information
            Epidemiology
            Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
            • Contact with wild species
            Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance (including wild bird surveillance of hunter harvested birds) in response to the HPAI H5N8 and H5N2 wild bird related events. Novel avian influenza virus of Eurasian origin (EA-H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4) spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014. Introduction of this EA-H5N8 virus into the Pacific Flyway sometime during 2014 has allowed mixing with North American (AM) lineage viruses and generated new combinations with genes from both EA and AM origin (or “reassortant” viruses) such as this EA/AM H5N2-reassortant detected in Canada and the US. These findings are not unexpected as the EA-H5N8 virus continues to circulate. The EA-H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses are highly pathogenic for poultry. On 13 March 2015, the USDA APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirmed HPAI EA/AM H5N2 positive results from a small backyard poultry flock in Leavenworth County, Kansas. Partial HA/NA sequence is >99% similar to A/northern pintail/Washington/40964/2014 based upon direct sequence attempt from chicken swab specimen. This is the first detection of HPAI EA/AM H5N2 in Kansas.
            Control measures
            Measures applied
            • Stamping out
            • Quarantine
            • Movement control inside the country
            • Zoning
            • Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
            • Vaccination prohibited
            • No treatment of affected animals
            Measures to be applied
            • No other measures
            Diagnostic test results
            Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
            National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 13/03/2015 Positive
            National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 13/03/2015 Positive
            Future Reporting
            The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

            .../
            http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wa...reportid=17398
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment

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