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  • #61


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    Interpretive Summary for September 9, 2022

    View LargerFall Boost


    On September 1, CDC recommended that everyone ages 12 years and older in the United States receive an updated COVID-19 booster before a possible surge in COVID-19 illnesses later this fall and winter. Like the original boosters, the updated doses help restore protection that might have gone down since your last dose—but they also give extra protection for yourself and those around you against the most recent variants.

    The updated booster is a bivalent vaccine because it targets two Omicron subvariants: BA.4 and BA.5. These newest subvariants are more contagious and able to evade protection that your body might have against earlier subvariants. Data suggest that the updated boosters also increase our immune response, which will help protect us against future variants.

    Being up to date with COVID-19 vaccines is the best way to protect against severe illness, hospitalization, and death associated with COVID-19. Everyone who is eligible―including those who are moderately to severely immunocompromised―is recommended to receive one dose of the updated bivalent booster at least two months after their last dose (either the final primary series or the last booster). The Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine, Bivalent is authorized for use as single booster dose in people ages 18 years and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, Bivalent is authorized for use as a single booster dose in people ages 12 years and older. To find a vaccine provider near you, visit vaccines.gov.

    Note to readers: Flu season is approaching. CDC recommends getting both a COVID-19 vaccine and a flu shot at the same visit. If you haven’t gotten your currently recommended dose of COVID-19 vaccine, get it as soon as you can, along with your flu vaccine.


    What's New
    COVID-19 Community Levels


    As of September 8, 2022, there are 555 (17.2%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,278 (39.7%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 1,387 (43.1%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a large decrease (−8.6 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a marginal decrease (-2.3 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a large increase (+10.2 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 47 out of 52 jurisdictions* had high- or medium-level counties this week. The District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Washington are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

    To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

    *Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

    U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County

    View Larger
    COVID-19 Community Levels
    Reported Cases


    As of September 7, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (70,488) decreased 18.8% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (86,853). A total of 94,888,931 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of September 7, 2022.

    Variant Proportions

    CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending September 10, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100% with the predominant Omicron lineage being BA.5, projected at 87.5% (95% PI 86.2-88.7%).

    There are several lineages of Omicron and within each are multiple sublineages. The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 9.2% (95% PI 8.1-10.4%), BA.4 is projected to be 2.2% (95% PI 2.1-2.4%), BA.2 is projected to be 1.0% (95% PI 0.6-1.7%), and BA.2.12.1 is projected to be 0.1% (95% PI 0.1-0.1%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

    94,888,931

    Total Cases Reported

    70,488

    Current 7-Day Average**

    86,853
    Prior 7-Day Average


    -18.8%
    Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

    *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

    **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 658,918 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and 16 were reported in the prior week.

    Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

    7-Day moving average

    View Larger
    More Case Data
    Vaccinations

    COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


    As of September 7, 2022, 610.7 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 263.1 million people, or 79.2% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 224.4 million people, or 67.6% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.*

    610,686,563

    Vaccine Doses Administered

    263,103,582
    People who received at least one dose
    (79.2% of the U.S. population)


    224,367,691
    People who are fully vaccinated*
    (67.6% of the U.S. population)


    +0.0
    Percentage point increase from last week

    +0.1
    Percentage point change from last week

    *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

    Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

    7-Day moving average

    View Larger
    More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


    Of those fully vaccinated, about 109.0 million people have received a booster dose,* but 50.0% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

    132,479,933
    Booster Doses Administered

    108,951,784
    Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

    22,176,710
    Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

    48.6%
    Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

    34.3%
    Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

    +0.0
    Percentage point increase from last week

    +0.3
    Percentage point increase from last week

    *Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

    **Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.


    COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States

    View Larger

    View Larger
    More Vaccination Data
    Hospitalizations

    New Hospital Admissions


    The current 7-day daily average for August 31–September 6, 2022, was 4,620. This is a 10.5% decrease from the prior 7-day average (5,163) from August 24–30, 2022.

    5,267,624
    Total New Admissions

    4,620
    Current 7-Day Average

    5,163
    Prior 7-Day Average

    -10.5%
    Change in 7-Day Average

    The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

    Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

    View Larger
    New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

    More Hospital Data
    COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates by Vaccination Status among Adults Ages ≥65 Years


    CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that pediatric rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations remain highest among children younger than 6 months old. For the week ending August 20, 2022, hospitalization rates among children younger than 6 months old are 17.8 per 100,000 population, compared with 3.7, 0.9, and 1.1 per 100,000 population for children ages 6 months–4 years, 5–11 years and 12–17 years, respectively.

    Monthly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization among Children Ages 0–17 Years


    View Larger


    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
    More COVID-NET Data
    Deaths


    The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (314) has decreased 28.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (437). As of September 7, 2022, a total of 1,043,921 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

    1,043,921
    Total Deaths Reported

    314
    Current 7-Day Average*

    437
    Prior 7-Day Average

    -28.1%
    Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

    *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 21,783 historical deaths reported retroactively, 27 were reported in the current week; and none were reported in the prior week.

    Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

    7-Day moving average

    View Larger
    More Death Data
    Testing


    The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is decreasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 13.2%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for August 26–September 1, 2022, was 466,849, down 9.1% from 513,596 for the prior 7 days.

    952,398,537

    Total Tests Reported

    466,849
    7-Day Average Tests Reported

    13.2%
    7-Day Average % Positivity

    13.5%
    Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

    -.33
    Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

    *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

    COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

    View Larger
    More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


    COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,000 testing sites across the country.

    Currently, most of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 27% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 56% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 38% are reporting an increase. It’s important to note that even a small increase when levels are low can appear like a dramatic increase in the percent change.

    For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s website.

    *The virus that causes COVID-19

    SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site

    View Larger



    0% means levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% means levels are the highest they have been at the site.
    More Wastewater Data

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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    • #62


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      Interpretive Summary for September 16, 2022
      Make Mine a Double


      Both COVID-19 and flu vaccines have been shown to reduce illness, hospitalizations, and deaths. As flu season approaches and COVID-19 vaccine recommendations are updated, you might be wondering if you need to wait after getting a flu vaccine before getting a COVID-19 vaccine? The answer is “no!” You can get them both at the same time if you are eligible and the timing works. Experience with other vaccines has shown that immune response (the way our bodies develop protection) and possible side effects are generally the same whether you get one vaccine at a time or two.

      Even though both vaccines can be given at the same visit, you should follow the recommended schedule for either vaccine: If you haven’t gotten your currently recommended doses of COVID-19 vaccine, get them as soon as you can, and ideally get a flu vaccine by the end of October. The same holds true for kids. If your child is eligible, they can get both vaccines at the same time, but don’t delay either vaccination in order to get them both at the same visit.

      A recent CDC study suggests people who received a flu vaccine and an mRNA COVID-19 booster at the same time were slightly more likely (8% to 11%) to report reactions like fatigue, headache, and muscle ache than people who received only the COVID-19 booster, but these reactions were mostly mild and resolved quickly. If you have concerns about getting both vaccines at the same time, speak with your healthcare provider.

      Note to readers: For more information, see Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination and Frequently Asked Questions about Influenza: 2022-2023.


      What's New
      COVID-19 Community Levels


      As of September 15, 2022, there are 439 (13.6%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,154 (35.8%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 1,627 (50.5%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a moderate decrease (−3.9 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a moderate decrease (-3.8 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a large increase (+7.4 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 46 out of 52 jurisdictions* had high- or medium-level counties this week. The District of Columbia, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Utah are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

      To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

      *Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

      U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County

      View Larger
      COVID-19 Community Levels
      Reported Cases


      As of September 14, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (59,856) decreased 15.9% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (71,190). A total of 95,314,517 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of September 14, 2022.

      Variant Proportions

      CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending September 17, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are five lineages designated as Omicron: BA.5, BA.4.6, BA.4, BF.7, and BA.2.75. UPDATE: BF.7 has been separated from BA.5 and BA.2.75 sublineage is separated from BA.2 due to their positive growth rate. Until last week, these were aggregated with BA.5 and BA.2, respectively. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected at 84.8% (95% PI 83.2-86.3%).

      The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 10.3% (95% PI 9.1-11.7%), BA.4 is projected to be 1.8% (95% PI 1.6-1.9%), BF.7 is projected to be 1.7% (95% PI 1.2-2.4%), and BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.3% (95% PI 0.8-2.2%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

      95,314,517
      Total Cases Reported

      59,856
      Current 7-Day Average**

      71,190
      Previous 7-Day Average

      -15.9%
      Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Week

      *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

      **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 658,910 historical cases reported retroactively, 8 were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

      Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average

      View Larger
      More Case Data
      Vaccinations

      COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


      As of September 14, 2022, 612.8 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 263.4 million people, or 79.3% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 224.6 million people, or 67.7% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.*

      612,781,120
      Vaccine Doses Administered

      263,415,633
      People who received at least one dose (79.3% of the U.S. population)

      224,636,858
      People who are fully vaccinated* (67.7% of the U.S. population)

      +0.1
      Percentage point increase from last week

      +0.1
      Percentage point change from last week

      *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

      Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

      7-Day moving average

      View Larger
      More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


      Of those fully vaccinated, about 109.2 million people have received a booster dose,* but 50.0% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

      133,366,571
      Booster Doses Administered

      109,199,336
      Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

      22,495,442
      Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

      48.7%
      Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

      34.7%
      Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

      +0.1
      Percentage point increase from last week

      +0.4
      Percentage point increase from last week

      *Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

      **Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.


      COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States

      View Larger

      View Larger
      More Vaccination Data
      Hospitalizations

      New Hospital Admissions


      The current 7-day daily average for September 7–12, 2022, was 4,371. This is a 6.1% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,657) from August 31–September 6, 2022.

      5,298,500
      Total New Admissions

      4,371
      Current 7-Day Average

      4,657
      Prior 7-Day Average

      -6.1%
      Change in 7-Day Average

      The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

      Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

      View Larger
      New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

      More Hospital Data
      COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates among Children Ages 6 Months and Younger


      CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that for the week ending August 27, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations for children ages 6 months and younger, who are not eligible for vaccination, is 19.5 per 100,000 population. While rates among children ages 6 months and younger have generally declined in recent weeks, they are the highest among all pediatric age groups and remain high compared with many previous months of the pandemic.

      Hospitalization Rates among Children Ages 6 Months and Younger


      View Larger


      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
      More COVID-NET Data
      Deaths


      The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (358) increased 3.9% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (344). As of September 14, 2022, a total of 1,047,020 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

      1,047,020
      Total Deaths Reported

      358
      Current 7-Day Average*

      344
      Prior 7-Day Average

      3.9%
      Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

      *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 21,915 historical deaths reported retroactively, 41 were reported in the current week; and 27 were reported in the prior week.

      Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average

      View Larger
      More Death Data
      Testing


      The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is decreasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 12.2%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for September 2-September 8, 2022, was 395,481, down 22.0% from 507,235 for the prior 7 days.

      955,004,672
      Total Tests Reported

      395,481
      7-Day Average Tests Reported

      12.2%
      7-Day Average % Positivity

      12.4%
      Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

      -0.25
      Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

      *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

      COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

      View Larger
      More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


      COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,000 testing sites across the country.

      Currently, most of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 23% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 43% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 48% are reporting an increase. It’s important to note that even a small increase when levels are low can appear like a dramatic increase in the percent change.

      For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s website.

      *The virus that causes COVID-19

      SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site

      View Larger



      0% means levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% means levels are the highest they have been at the site.
      More Wastewater Data

      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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      • #63


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        Interpretive Summary for September 23, 2022
        Fall into Healthy Habits


        The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on all our lives. For many, this has meant delayed medical care, sleepless nights, extra screen time, and isolation from friends and family. As the days get shorter and cooler and the seasons change, try these strategies to take care of yourself and maintain a healthy lifestyle.
        • Attend routine health care visits. Aim to visit your health care provider at least once per year and dental provider two times per year unless they recommend more frequent visits.
        • Move more, sit less. Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health, fitness and quality of life. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity every week, plus muscle-strengthening activities twice a week.
        • Eat healthy meals and snacks and drink wisely. Eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy products for healthy meals and snacks. Substitute water for sugary or alcoholic drinks to reduce calories and stay safe.
        • Aim to get at least 7 hours of sleep each night. Try consistency: go to bed at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning. Remove electronic devices from your bedroom.
        • Make time to unwind and connect with others. Take deep breaths, stretch, meditate, or do an activity you enjoy. Talk with people you trust about how you’re feeling and express gratitude.

        Remember ― prevention is the best medicine. Regular checkups provide the opportunity to prevent, screen for, and manage chronic conditions, and get routine vaccinations. This fall, get your COVID-19 booster and flu shot. Both COVID-19 and flu vaccines have been shown to reduce illness, hospitalizations, and deaths. You can get them both at the same time if you are eligible and the timing works. Find a vaccine provider near you.


        What's New
        • COVID Data Tracker’s Vaccinations in the US page was updated to include a national count of the number of people with an updated booster dose.

        COVID-19 Community Levels


        As of September 22, 2022, there are 226 (7.0%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,005 (31.2%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 1,986 (61.7%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a large decrease (−6.3 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a moderate decrease (-4.7 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a large increase (+11.0 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 46 out of 52 jurisdictions* had high- or medium-level counties this week. Arizona, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Utah are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

        To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

        *Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

        U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County

        View Larger
        COVID-19 Community Levels
        Reported Cases


        As of September 21, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (54,186) decreased 10.6% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (60,593). A total of 95,700,347 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of September 21, 2022.

        Variant Proportions

        CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending September 24, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are five lineages designated as Omicron: BA.5, BA.4.6, BA.4, BF.7, and BA.2.75. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected at 83.1% (95% PI 81.3-84.7%).

        The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 11.9% (95% PI 10.6-13.4%), BF.7 is projected to be 2.3% (95% PI 1.7-3.0%), BA.4 is projected to be 1.4% (95% PI 1.3-1.5%), and BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.4% (95% PI 0.9-2.0%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

        95,700,347
        Total Cases Reported

        54,186
        Current 7-Day Average**

        60,593
        Previous 7-Day Average

        -10.6%
        Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Week

        *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

        **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 658,910 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and 8 were reported in the prior week.

        Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average

        View Larger
        More Case Data
        Vaccinations

        COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


        As of September 21, 2022, 616.2 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 263.8 million people, or 79.5% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 225.0 million people, or 67.8% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

        616,172,308
        Vaccine Doses Administered

        263,812,108
        People who received at least one dose (79.5% of the U.S. population)

        224,980,931
        People who are fully vaccinated* (67.8% of the U.S. population)

        +0.2
        Percentage point increase from last week

        +0.1
        Percentage point change from last week

        *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

        Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

        7-Day moving average

        View Larger
        More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


        Of those who have completed a primary series, about 109.6 million people have received a booster dose,* and 4.4 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.9% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

        134,887,079
        Booster Doses Administered

        109,575,554
        Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

        23,118,101
        Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

        48.8%
        Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

        35.5%
        Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

        +0.1
        Percentage point increase from last week

        +0.8
        Percentage point increase from last week

        *Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

        **Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

        COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States

        View Larger

        View Larger
        More Vaccination Data
        Hospitalizations

        New Hospital Admissions


        The current 7-day daily average for September 14–20, 2022, was 3,971. This is a 9.9% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,410) from September 7–13, 2022.

        5,327,014
        Total New Admissions

        3,971
        Current 7-Day Average

        4,410
        Prior 7-Day Average

        -9.9%
        Change in 7-Day Average

        The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

        Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

        View Larger
        New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

        More Hospital Data
        COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations among Adults 65 Years and Older


        CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continue to affect adults ages 65 years and older. Since early April 2022, more than 50% of all COVID-19-associated hospitalizations occurring every week are among adults ages 65 years and older. Before April 2022, adults ages 65 years and older had not comprised more than half of all COVID-19-associated hospitalizations since January 2021.

        Trends in Hospitalizations among Adults 65 Years and Older


        View Larger


        The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
        More COVID-NET Data
        Deaths


        The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (347) decreased 12.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (396). As of September 21, 2022, a total of 1,049,864 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

        1,049,864
        Total Deaths Reported

        347
        Current 7-Day Average*

        396
        Prior 7-Day Average

        -12.2%
        Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

        *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 21,750 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week; and 41 were reported in the prior week.

        Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average

        View Larger
        More Death Data
        Testing


        The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is decreasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 10.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for September 9 – 15, 2022, was 412,967, down 5.3% from 435,920 for the prior 7 days.

        958,598,352
        Total Tests Reported

        412,967
        7-Day Average Tests Reported

        10.7%
        7-Day Average % Positivity

        11.3%
        Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

        -0.62
        Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

        *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

        COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

        View Larger
        More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


        COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,000 testing sites across the country.

        Currently, most of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 18% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 49% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 44% are reporting an increase. It’s important to note that even a small increase when levels are low can appear like a dramatic increase in the percent change.

        For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s website.

        *The virus that causes COVID-19

        SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site

        View Larger



        0% means levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% means levels are the highest they have been at the site.
        More Wastewater Data

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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        • #64


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          Interpretive Summary for September 30, 2022

          The Update on “Up to Date”


          Since CDC recommended the updated (bivalent) COVID-19 boosters earlier this month, 7.6 million eligible people in the United States have gotten one. Bivalent boosters help restore protection that might have gone down since your last dose—and they also give extra protection for you and those around you against all lineages of the Omicron variant. Both Moderna and Pfizer offer bivalent boosters.

          The introduction of the new boosters has caused some changes in vaccine recommendations, which are based on your age, the vaccine you first received, and time since your last dose. You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines if you have completed a COVID-19 vaccine primary series and received the most recent booster dose recommended for you by CDC. Here’s the breakdown:
          • People ages 6 months through 4 years should get all COVID-19 primary series doses.
          • People ages 5 years and older should get all primary series doses, and the booster dose recommended for them by CDC.
            • People ages 5 to 11 years are currently recommended to get the original (monovalent) booster.
            • People ages 12 years and older are recommended to receive the updated Pfizer or Moderna bivalent booster.
              • This includes people who have received all primary series doses and people who have previously received one or more original boosters.
              • At this time, people ages 12 to 17 years can only receive the updated Pfizer bivalent booster.
          • People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised have different recommendations for COVID-19 vaccines.

          The more people who stay up to date on their vaccinations, the better chance we have of avoiding a possible surge in COVID-19 illness later this fall and winter. Use this tool to determine when or if you (or your child) can get one or more COVID-19 boosters.

          Note to Readers: CDC will not publish COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review on Friday, October 7, 2022. Publication will resume on Friday, October 14, 2022


          What's New
          • COVID Data Tracker’s Vaccinations in the US page was updated to include bivalent booster dose data. Additionally, the “Vaccine Administration by Vaccine Type” and “Vaccine Distribution by Vaccine Type” charts were relabeled with “Pfizer/Moderna original” and “Pfizer/Moderna updated booster.”

          COVID-19 Community Levels*


          As of September 29, 2022, there are 107 (3.3%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 737 (22.9%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,373 (73.7%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a moderate decrease (−3.7 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a large decrease (-8.3 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a large increase (+12.0 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 45 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. Arizona, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Utah are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

          To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

          *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

          **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

          U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


          View Larger
          COVID-19 Community Levels
          Reported Cases


          As of September 28, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (47,112) decreased 13.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (54,202). A total of 96,052,716 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of September 28, 2022.

          Variant Proportions

          CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending October 1, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are five sublineages designated as Omicron: BA.5, BA.4.6, BF.7, BA.2.75, and BA.4. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected to be 81.3% (95% PI 79.6-83.0%).

          The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 12.8% (95% PI 11.5-14.1%), BF.7 is projected to be 3.4% (95% PI 2.6-4.4%), BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.4% (95% PI 1.1-1.9%), and BA.4 is projected to be 1.1% (95% PI 1.0-1.2%. See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

          96,052,716
          Total Cases Reported

          47,112
          Current 7-Day Average**

          54,202
          Previous 7-Day Average

          -13.1%
          Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Week

          *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

          **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 670,655 historical cases reported retroactively, 11,753 were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

          Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average


          View Larger
          More Case Data
          Vaccinations

          COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


          As of September 28, 2022, 619.8 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 264.1 million people, or 79.5% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 225.3 million people, or 67.9% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

          619,765,972
          Vaccine Doses Administered

          264,112,767
          People who received at least one dose (79.5% of the U.S. population)

          225,284,115
          People who are fully vaccinated* (67.9% of the U.S. population)

          +0.0
          Percentage point change from last week

          +0.1
          Percentage point change from last week

          *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

          Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

          7-Day moving average


          View Larger
          More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


          Of those who have completed a primary series, about 110.0 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 7.5 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.8% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

          136,601,541
          Booster Doses Administered

          109,967,267
          Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

          23,869,248
          Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

          48.9%
          Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

          36.6%
          Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

          +0.1
          Percentage point change from last week

          +1.1
          Percentage point change from last week

          *Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

          **Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

          COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States


          View Larger

          View Larger
          More Vaccination Data
          Hospitalizations

          New Hospital Admissions


          The current 7-day daily average for September 21–27, 2022, was 3,733. This is a 7.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,029) from September 14–20, 2022.

          5,353,767
          Total New Admissions

          3,773
          Current 7-Day Average

          4,029
          Prior 7-Day Average

          -7.4%
          Change in 7-Day Average

          The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

          Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


          View Larger
          New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

          More Hospital Data
          COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates among Adults 85 Years and Older


          CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations are highest among adults ages 85 years and older. However, rates (per 100,000 population) have decreased by 25% over the past month, from 83.1 for the week ending August 6, 2022, to 62.0 for the week ending September 10, 2022.

          Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 85 Years and Older


          View Larger
          The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

          More COVID-NET Data
          Deaths


          The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (344) decreased 6.7% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (368). As of September 28, 2022, a total of 1,053,173 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

          1,053,173
          Total Deaths Reported

          344
          Current 7-Day Average*

          368
          Prior 7-Day Average

          -6.7%
          Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

          *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 22,233 historical deaths reported retroactively, 483 were reported in the current week; and none were reported in the prior week.

          Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average


          View Larger
          More Death Data
          Testing


          The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 9.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for September 16–22, 2022, was 400,255, down 16.7% from 480,510 for the prior 7 days.

          961,853,873
          Total Tests Reported

          400,255
          7-Day Average Tests Reported

          9.8%
          7-Day Average % Positivity

          9.6%
          Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

          +0.16
          Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

          *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

          COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


          View Larger
          More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


          COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,250 testing sites across the country. Currently, most of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 16% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 53% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 41% are reporting an increase. It’s important to note that even a small increase when levels are low can appear like a dramatic increase in the percent change

          For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s website.

          *The virus that causes COVID-19

          SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


          View Larger


          0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

          https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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          • #65


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            Interpretive Summary for October 14, 2022

            A Spooky—and Safe—Halloween


            It’s time to pick out your costume and get ready to celebrate Halloween! Over the past two-plus years, we’ve learned new ways to enjoy pandemic holidays, and “outside is always safer” has been the mantra for these holiday gatherings. Luckily, that’s easy to do on Halloween, because trick-or-treating generally involves plenty of outdoor time. But that doesn’t mean it’s totally risk-free. Here are some more tips for staying COVID-safe this Halloween.
            • Stay home if you’re sick. Skip the Halloween party if you aren’t feeling well.
            • Get tested if you have COVID-19 symptoms.
            • Take precautions in crowded or indoor events as informed by your county’s COVID-19 Community Level, like wearing a high-quality mask (and Halloween masks don’t count). Consider making the mask part of the costume—like a doctor, nurse, ninja, or cowboy.
            • If you’re hosting celebrations, review options for improving ventilation in your home. This can help you reduce virus particles in your home and keep COVID-19 from spreading.
            • Keep your hands clean. If you’re out trick-or-treating, bring hand sanitizer. If you’re giving out candy, wash your hands frequently.

            And of course, the best way to protect yourself and others from severe illness from COVID-19 on Halloween (and every day) is to stay up to date on your COVID-19 vaccinations! Use this tool to find out when you can get a booster.

            Note to Readers: On October 12, 2022, CDC recommended updated (bivalent) COVID-19 boosters for children ages 5 years and older in the United States, making the updated boosters available to millions of children in this age group.


            What's New
            COVID-19 Community Levels*


            As of October 13, 2022, there are 67 (2.1%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 583 (18.1%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,567 (79.7%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a minor decrease (−0.8 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a moderate decrease (-2.2 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a moderate increase (+3.0 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 45 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. Arizona, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, South Carolina, and Utah are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

            To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

            *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

            **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

            U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


            View Larger
            COVID-19 Community Levels
            Reported Cases


            As of October 12, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (38,949) decreased 11.9% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (44,233). A total of 96,640,059 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of October 12, 2022.

            Variant Proportions

            CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending October 1, 2022 estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are eight designated as Omicron: BA.5, BA.4.6, BQ.1.1, BQ.1, BF.7, BA2.75.2, BA.2.75, and BA.4. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected to be 67.9% (95% PI 64.1-71.4%).

            The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 12.2% (95% PI 11.1-13.4%), BQ.1.1 is projected to be 5.7% (95% PI 3.5-9.1%), BQ.1 is projected to be 5.7% (95% PI 3.5-8.9%), BF.7 is projected to be 5.3% (95% PI 4.6-6.1%), BA.2.75.2 is projected to be 1.4% (95% PI 0.9-2.2%), BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.3% (95% PI 1.0-1.6%), and BA.4 is projected to be 0.6% (95% PI 0.5-0.6%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

            96,640,059
            Total Cases Reported

            38,949
            Current 7-Day Average**

            44,233
            Previous 7-Day Average

            -11.9%
            Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Week

            *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

            **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 670,655 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

            Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

            7-Day moving average


            View Larger
            More Case Data
            Vaccinations

            COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


            As of October 12, 2022, 627.9 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 265.1 million people, or 79.9% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 226.2 million people, or 68.1% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

            627,854,963
            Vaccine Doses Administered

            265,111,489
            People who received at least one dose (79.5% of the U.S. population)

            226,200,755
            People who are fully vaccinated* (67.9% of the U.S. population)

            +0.2
            Percentage point change from last week

            +0.1
            Percentage point change from last week

            *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

            Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

            7-Day moving average


            View Larger
            More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


            Of those who have completed a primary series, about 110.8 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 14.78 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.6% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

            140,398,659
            Booster Doses Administered

            110,831,519
            Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

            25,623,483
            Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

            49.1%
            Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

            39.0%
            Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

            +0.0
            Percentage point change from last week

            +1.1
            Percentage point change from last week

            *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

            **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.


            COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States


            View Larger

            View Larger
            More Vaccination Data
            Hospitalizations

            New Hospital Admissions


            The current 7-day daily average for October 5–11, 2022, was 3,268. This is a 4.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (3,419) from September 28–October 4, 2022.

            5,400,083
            Total New Admissions

            3,268
            Current 7-Day Average

            3,419
            Prior 7-Day Average

            -4.4%
            Change in 7-Day Average

            The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

            Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


            View Larger
            New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

            More Hospital Data
            COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates among Adults and Children (All Ages)


            CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continue to decline. Hospitalization rates among people of all ages declined from a recent peak of 9.6 per 100,000 population for the week ending July 30, 2022 to 6.0 for the week ending September 24, 2022.

            Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults and Children (all ages)


            View Larger
            The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

            More COVID-NET Data
            Deaths


            The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (328) decreased 8.5% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (359). As of October 12, 2022, a total of 1,058,692 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

            1,058,692
            Total Deaths Reported

            328
            Current 7-Day Average*

            359
            Prior 7-Day Average

            -8.5%
            Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

            *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 22,299 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week; and 27 were reported in the prior week.

            Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

            7-Day moving average


            View Larger
            More Death Data
            Testing


            The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 8.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for September 30–October 6, 2022, was 352,558, down 18.6% from 432,888 for the prior 7 days.

            967,890,195
            Total Tests Reported

            352,558
            7-Day Average Tests Reported

            8.8%
            7-Day Average % Positivity

            8.3%
            Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

            +0.47
            Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

            *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

            COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


            View Larger
            More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


            COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,250 testing sites across the country.

            Currently, about 35% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 16% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 53% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 41% are reporting an increase. It’s important to note that even a small increase when levels are low can appear like a dramatic increase in the percent change.

            For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s website.

            *The virus that causes COVID-19

            SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


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            0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

            https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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            • #66

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              Interpretive Summary for October 21, 2022

              Monitoring Variants


              Viruses constantly change through mutation, and sometimes these mutations result in new variants of the virus. Numerous variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, have been tracked in the United States and globally during this pandemic. The Omicron variant, like other variants, is made up of a number of lineages and sublineages. These lineages are often very similar to each other, but there can be differences that affect the behavior of the virus.

              CDC is closely tracking a wide range of Omicron sublineages, including three drawing recent attention. BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 are offshoots—grandchildren, if you will—of the BA.5 that’s been dominant for months. CDC data show that they seem to be spreading relatively quickly so far, but they’re still a small proportion of overall variants. CDC is also keeping a close eye on a sublineage called XBB based on international reports, although it’s still very rare in the United States.

              Sometimes new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, they persist and continue to circulate in communities. As the virus spreads, it has new opportunities to change in ways that can make emerging variants more difficult to stop because the effectiveness of vaccinations or treatments may be reduced. We can monitor mutations from one variant to another and monitor the impact of these changes by comparing differences in real-world characteristics, such as effectiveness of vaccines or treatments. By studying each variant and understanding these differences, scientists can monitor whether a new variant might be more dangerous.

              CDC is using multiple surveillance systems to monitor variants in the United States. Data from each system plays an important role in helping us understand the emergence of new variants, whether they’re entering the United States and spreading, and which variants are most prevalent within communities. On October 20, 2022, COVID Data Tracker added a new Variant Summary page, which summarizes three systems that are being used to monitor variants. For more information on these systems, see A Closer Look.


              What's New
              COVID-19 Community Levels*


              As of October 20, 2022, there are 46 (1.4%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 565 (17.6%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,606 (80.9%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a minor decrease (−0.7 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a minor decrease (-0.6 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a minor increase (+1.2 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 44 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. Alaska, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah, and Washington are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

              To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

              *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

              **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

              U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


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              COVID-19 Community Levels
              Reported Cases


              As of October 19, 2022, the current 21-day average of weekly new cases (39,803) decreased 30.9% compared with the previous 21-day moving average (57,564). A total of 97,063,357 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of October 19, 2022.

              Variant Proportions

              CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending October 22, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are eight sublineages designated as Omicron: BA.5, BA.4.6, BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, BA.2.75, BA.2.75.2 and BA.4. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected to be 62.2% (95% PI 57.8-66.3%).

              The national proportion of BA.4.6 is projected to be 11.3% (95% PI 10.2-12.6%), BQ.1 is projected to be 9.4% (95% PI 6.7-12.9%), BQ.1.1 is projected to be 7.2% (95% PI 4.8-10.4%), BF.7 is projected to be 6.7% (95% PI 5.8-7.6%), BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.6% (95% PI 1.3-1.9%), BA.2.75.2 is projected to be 1.3% (95% PI 0.9-1.9%), and BA.4 is projected to be 0.4% (95% PI 0.3-0.4%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

              97,063,357
              Total Cases Reported

              39,803
              Current 21-Day Average**

              57,564
              Previous 21-Day Average

              -30.9%
              Change in 21-Day Average since Previous Week

              *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

              **Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 670,655 historical cases reported retroactively, 11,753 were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

              Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


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              More Case Data
              Vaccinations

              COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


              As of October 20, 2022, 632.9 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 265.6 million people, or 80% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 226.6 million people, or 68.2% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

              632,905,664
              Vaccine Doses Administered

              265,591,330
              People who received at least one dose (80.0% of the U.S. population)

              226,594,560
              People who are fully vaccinated* (68.2% of the U.S. population)

              +0.5
              Percentage point change from last week

              +0.3
              Percentage point change from last week

              *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

              Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

              7-Day moving average


              View Larger
              More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


              Of those who have completed a primary series, about 111.4 million people have received a booster dose*, and more than 19.35 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.5% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

              142,897,463
              Booster Doses Administered

              111,363,104
              Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

              26,796,838
              Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

              49.3%
              Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

              40.6%
              Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

              +0.4
              Percentage point change from last week

              +4.0
              Percentage point change from last week

              *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

              **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

              COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States


              View Larger

              View Larger
              More Vaccination Data
              Hospitalizations

              New Hospital Admissions


              The current 7-day daily average for October 12–18, 2022, was 3,156. This is a 4.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (3,301) from October 5–11, 2022.

              5,422,246
              Total New Admissions

              3,156
              Current 7-Day Average

              3,301
              Prior 7-Day Average

              -4.4%
              Change in 7-Day Average

              The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

              Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


              View Larger
              New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

              More Hospital Data
              COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates among Adults and Children (All Ages)


              CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continue to decline. Hospitalization rates among people of all ages declined from a recent peak of 9.6 per 100,000 population for the week ending July 30, 2022, to 5.5 per 100,000 population for the week ending October 1, 2022.

              Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults and Children (All Ages)


              View Larger
              The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

              More COVID-NET Data
              Deaths


              The current 21-day moving average of new deaths (388) decreased 13.0% compared with the previous 21-day moving average (446). As of October 19, 2022, a total of 1,065,152 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

              1,065,152
              Total Deaths Reported

              388
              Current 21-Day Average*

              446
              Prior 21-Day Average

              -13.0%
              Change in 21-Day Average Since Prior Week

              *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 22 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week; and were reported in the prior week.

              Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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              More Death Data
              Testing


              The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 8.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for October 7–13, 2022, was 339,441, down 16.4% from 406,263 for the prior 7 days.

              970,743,174
              Total Tests Reported

              339,441
              7-Day Average Tests Reported

              8.7%
              7-Day Average % Positivity

              8.1%
              Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

              +0.56
              Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

              *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

              COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


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              More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


              COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,250 testing sites across the country.

              Currently, about 34% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 9% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 42% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 51% are reporting an increase.

              For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

              *The virus that causes COVID-19

              SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


              View Larger


              0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

              More Wastewater DataA Closer Look


              A Closer Look Section presents more detailed information for readers who want to learn more about current issues of interest.

              Understanding COVID-19 Genomic Surveillance Systems

              CDC is using multiple surveillance systems to monitor variants in the United States. Data from each system plays an important role in helping us effectively understand the emergence of new variants, whether variants are entering and spreading in the United States, and which variants are most prevalent within communities in the United States.

              On October 20, 2022, COVID Data Tracker added a new Variant Summary page within the Variant and Genomic Surveillance data grouping. This page summarizes three systems that are being used to monitor variants. These systems also have dedicated pages on COVID Data Tracker:
              • CDC’s national genomic surveillance system collects SARS-CoV-2 respiratory specimens for sequencing through the National SARS-CoV-2 Strain Surveillance (NS3) Program, as well as SARS-CoV-2 sequences generated by commercial laboratories contracted by CDC, state and local public health laboratories, and academic laboratories. Viral genetic sequences are analyzed and classified as a particular variant. The thousands of sequences analyzed every week through CDC’s national genomic sequencing and bioinformatics efforts fuel the comprehensive and population-based U.S. surveillance system established to identify and monitor the spread of variants.
              • The National Wastewater Surveillance System (NWSS) works with health departments, laboratories, and wastewater utilities to provide information on SARS-CoV-2 wastewater concentration levels in sewersheds of participating communities. CDC has worked closely with these partners as wastewater surveillance has been adopted by many communities across the nation, and as CDC has developed wastewater surveillance guidance and a centralized reporting system. The NWSS data system provides near real-time, consistent data analysis and results reporting that health departments can use to support their COVID-19 response. Wastewater surveillance can be a critical early warning for authorities of new outbreaks and inform local decision-making, such as where to have mobile testing and vaccination sites.
              • Travelers are an especially important group to consider when tracking new and emerging infectious diseases. Travelers move from place to place quickly and can get and spread infectious diseases. The Traveler-based SARS-CoV-2 Genomic Surveillance Program collects clinical specimens voluntarily provided by travelers arriving at several major international airports in the United States for early detection of variants entering the country and to fill gaps in global surveillance.
              https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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              • #67


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                Interpretive Summary for October 28, 2022


                View LargerImproving COVID-19 Vaccine Equity


                In September 2022, CDC recommended updated (bivalent)* COVID-19 boosters. Everyone in the United States ages 5 years and older—including those who are moderately or severely immunocompromised—is recommended to receive one dose of the updated booster if it’s been at least two months since their last dose (either the final primary series dose or an original (monovalent)* booster). Nearly 23 million people ages 5 years and older in the United States have received an updated booster as of October 28, 2022.

                COVID Data Tracker has started a series of data releases that include information on updated booster dose administration and uptake in the United States. On October 28, new survey results were added to the Trends in COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in the US tab. The results show that, among survey participants who have completed a primary series, 15.3% reported having received the updated booster, 32.2% definitely plan to get it, 33.0% probably will or are unsure, and 19.5% probably or definitely will not get it. Updated booster uptake among those that completed a primary series was highest among White, non-Hispanic survey participants (19.1%), and lower among American Indian and Alaska Native (non-Hispanic) (7.1%), Black (non-Hispanic) (7.4%), and Hispanic or Latino (10.5%) survey participants., and survey participants of multiple races (6.7%).

                A snapshot of updated booster dose administration data was also added to CDC’s website. These data show that updated booster intake is highest among adults ages 65 years and older (20%), and lowest among children ages 5 to 17 years (0-2%). Uptake is also highest among non-Hispanic Asian (8%), non-Hispanic multiracial (8%), and non-Hispanic White (8%) people, and lowest among non-Hispanic Black people (3%) and Hispanic or Latino (3%) people. COVID Data Tracker will continue to add updated booster dose administration data to all vaccination sites, including the addition of demographic trend data.

                Is it time for a booster?

                Use this tool to determine when or if you (or your child) can get an updated (bivalent) COVID-19 booster.

                COVID-19 treatments and vaccines, including the updated booster, provide defenses against the most severe outcomes of COVID-19. Yet challenges remain in ensuring all people have fair and just access to COVID-19 vaccination. CDC is paving the way in vaccine equity efforts with national, state, tribal, territorial, local, and community partners to ensure that people from racial and ethnic minority groups have fair and just access to COVID-19 vaccination. For more information, visit COVID-19 Vaccine Equity for Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups.

                * The updated (bivalent) boosters are called “bivalent” because they protect against both the original virus that causes COVID-19 and the Omicron variants BA.4 and BA.5. Monovalent boosters protect only against the original COVID-19 strain.


                What's New
                COVID-19 Community Levels*


                As of October 27, 2022, there are 73 (2.3%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 705 (21.9%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,439 (75.8%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a minor increase (+0.8 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a minor increase (+4.4 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a minor decrease (-5.2 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 46 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. California, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, North Carolina, and South Carolina are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                View Larger
                COVID-19 Community Levels
                Reported Cases


                As of October 26, 2022, the current 21-day average of weekly new cases (37,683) decreased 25.1% compared with the previous 21-day average (50,328). A total of 97,329,787 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of October 26, 2022.

                Variant Proportions

                CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending October 29, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are eight lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and four of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, and BA.5.2.6)—BA.4.6, BA.2.75, and BA.2.75.2. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected to be 49.6% (95% PI 45.3-53.9%).

                The national proportion of BQ.1 is projected to be 14.0% (95% PI 11.2-17.5%), BQ.1.1 is projected to be 13.1% (95% PI 9.8-17.3%), BA.4.6 is projected to be 9.6% (95% PI 8.6-10.7%), BF.7 is projected to be 7.5% (95% PI 6.6-8.5%), BA.5.2.6 is projected to be 2.8% (95% PI 2.3-3.5%), BA.2.75 is projected to be 1.8% (95% PI 1.5-2.2%), and BA.2.75.2 is projected to be 1.2% (95% PI 0.9-1.6%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

                97,329,787
                Total Cases Reported

                37,683
                Current 21-Day Average**

                50,328
                Previous 21-Day Average

                -25.1%
                Change in 21-Day Average since Previous Week

                *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 21-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


                View Larger
                More Case Data
                Vaccinations

                COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


                As of October 26, 2022, 636.9 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 266.0 million people, or 80.1% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 226.9 million people, or 68.4% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

                636,871,557
                Vaccine Doses Administered

                266,031,472
                People who received at least one dose (80.1% of the U.S. population)

                226,933,827
                People who are fully vaccinated* (68.4% of the U.S. population)

                +0.1
                Percentage point change from last week

                +0.2%
                Percentage point change from last week

                *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                7-Day moving average


                View Larger
                More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


                Of those who have completed a primary series, about 111.8 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 22.88 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.3% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

                144,909,794
                Booster Doses Administered

                111,843,722
                Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

                27,775,103
                Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

                49.4%
                Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

                41.9%
                Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

                +0.1
                Percentage point change from last week

                +1.3
                Percentage point change from last week

                *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

                **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

                COVID-19 Booster Dose Administration, United States


                View Larger

                View Larger
                More Vaccination Data
                Hospitalizations

                New Hospital Admissions


                The current 7-day daily average for October 19–25, 2022, was 3,249. This is a 1.0% increase from the prior 7-day average (3,217) from October 12–18, 2022.

                5,445,602
                Total New Admissions

                3,249
                Current 7-Day Average

                3,217
                Prior 7-Day Average

                +1.0%
                Change in 7-Day Average

                The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                View Larger
                New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                More Hospital Data
                COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates among Adults Ages 85 Years and Older


                CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continue to decline among all age groups, including adults ages 65 years and older. Among adults ages 85 years and older, the age group with the highest rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalization, rates (per 100,000 population) have decreased by more than 35% over the past two months, from 83.8 for the week ending August 6, 2022, to 52.4 for the week ending October 8, 2022.

                Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 85 Years and Older


                View Larger
                The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                More COVID-NET Data
                Deaths


                The current 21-day average of new deaths (373) decreased 13.7% compared with the previous 21-day average (432). As of October 26, 2022, a total of 1,066,351 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                1,066,351
                Total Deaths Reported

                373
                Current 21-Day Average*

                432
                Prior 21-Day Average

                -13.7%
                Change in 21-Day Average Since Prior Week

                *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 21-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 1,031 historical deaths reported retroactively, 562 were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


                View Larger
                More Death Data
                Testing


                The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 8.5%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for October 14–20, 2022, was 328,658, down 16.3% from 392,847 for the prior 7 days.

                973,505,408
                Total Tests Reported

                328,658
                7-Day Average Tests Reported

                8.5%
                7-Day Average % Positivity

                8.0%
                Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                +0.51
                Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                View Larger
                More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,100 testing sites across the country.

                Currently, about 34% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 10% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 44% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 50% are reporting an increase.

                For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                *The virus that causes COVID-19

                SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                View Larger


                0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                More Wastewater Data

                https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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                  Interpretive Summary for November 4, 2022


                  View LargerStay Safe this Season


                  COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the United States have been decreasing for the past few months, but that decline has slowed in recent weeks. Meanwhile, cold and flu season is off to an earlier start than usual, with respiratory viruses like flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) on the rise, especially among children. The combination of COVID-19, flu, and RSV could continue to stress the healthcare system this fall and winter.

                  COVID-19 vaccinations and treatments are the best protection against serious illness from COVID-19, but uptake of the new bivalent booster has been low since CDC recommended it in September. More than 26 million people over age 5 years have gotten an updated booster, but that’s only 8.4% of the U.S. population. Hundreds of millions more people need to get up to date with their COVID-19 vaccinations.

                  As people start to travel and gather for the holidays, it’s vitally important that we protect ourselves and others from COVID-19 and all respiratory viruses. You can do this through masking, testing, and other layered prevention measures such as improving ventilation and spending time outdoors. You can also use COVID-19 Community Levels to help you make an informed decision about what steps to take. Children ages 6 months to 4 years should get a flu shot and complete their COVID-19 primary series. Everyone ages 5 years and older should get a flu shot and an updated booster. You can get a flu shot and a booster at the same time if you want. Check if and when to get COVID-19 boosters with CDC’s COVID-19 booster tool.


                  What's New
                  COVID-19 Community Levels*


                  As of November 3, 2022, there are 78 (2.0%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 614 (20.1%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,525 (77.5%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a minor increase (+0.2 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a minor decrease (-2.8 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a minor increase (+2.7 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 45 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. California, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Washington are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                  To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                  *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                  **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                  U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


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                  COVID-19 Community Levels
                  Reported Cases


                  As of November 2, 2022, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (39,016) increased 4.7% compared with the previous 7-day average (37,261). A total of 97,604,763 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of November 2, 2022.

                  Variant Proportions

                  CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending November 5, 2022, estimate that the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron will continue to be 100%. There are eight lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and four of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, and BA.5.2.6)—BA.4.6, BA.2.75, and BA.2.75.2. The predominant Omicron lineage is BA.5, projected to be 39.2% (95% PI 36.2-42.3%).

                  The national proportion of BQ.1.1 is projected to be 18.8% (95% PI 15.7-22.4%), BQ.1 is projected to be 16.5% (95% PI 13.6-20.0%), BA.4.6 is projected to be 9.5% (95% PI 8.6-10.5%), BF.7 is projected to be 9.0% (95% PI 7.9-10.1%), BA.5.2.6 is projected to be 3.1% (95% PI 2.5-3.7%), BA.2.75 is projected to be 2.3% (95% PI 1.9-2.8%), and BA.2.75.2 is projected to be 1.3% (95% PI 0.9-1.7%). See COVID Data Tracker for current data.

                  97,604,763
                  Total Cases Reported

                  39,016
                  Current 7-Day Average**

                  37,261
                  Previous 7-Day Average

                  4.7%
                  Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                  *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                  **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. No historical cases reported at this time.

                  Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


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                  More Case Data
                  Vaccinations

                  COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


                  As of November 2, 2022, 640.9 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 266.4 million people, or 80.2% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 227.4 million people, or 68.5% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

                  640,913,400
                  Vaccine Doses Administered

                  266,401,911
                  People who received at least one dose (80.2% of the U.S. population)

                  227,377,753
                  People who have completed a primary series* (68.5% of the U.S. population)


                  +0.1
                  Percentage point change from last week

                  +0.1%
                  Percentage point change from last week

                  *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                  Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                  7-Day moving average


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                  More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


                  Of those who have completed a primary series, about 112.5 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 26.38 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 49.1% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

                  147,242,201
                  Booster Doses Administered

                  112,473,353
                  Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

                  28,830,116
                  Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

                  49.6%
                  Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

                  43.2%
                  Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

                  +0.2
                  Percentage point change from last week

                  +1.3
                  Percentage point change from last week

                  *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

                  **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

                  COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


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                  More Vaccination Data
                  Hospitalizations

                  New Hospital Admissions


                  The current 7-day daily average for October 26–November 1, 2022, was 3,272. This is a 1.0% decrease from the prior 7-day average (3,306) from October 19–25, 2022.

                  5,469,077
                  Total New Admissions

                  3,272
                  Current 7-Day Average

                  3,306
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  -1.0%
                  Change in 7-Day Average

                  The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                  Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                  View Larger
                  New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                  More Hospital Data
                  COVID-NET: Trends in Percentage of Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                  CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continue to affect adults ages 65 years and older. Since early April 2022, more than 50% of all COVID-19-associated hospitalizations occurring every week are among adults ages 65 years and older, and this proportion has continued to increase. Beginning the week ending October 8, 2022, adults ages 65 years and older have comprised more than 60% of all COVID-19-associated hospitalizations.

                  Percentage of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations by Age Group


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                  The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                  More COVID-NET Data
                  Deaths


                  The current 7-day average of new deaths (358) decreased 3.0% compared with the previous 7-day average (369). As of November 2, 2022, a total of 1,068,667 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                  1,068,667
                  Total Deaths Reported

                  358
                  Current 7-Day Average*

                  369
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  -3.0%

                  Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                  *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 1,032 historical deaths reported retroactively, 1 was reported in the current week and 562 were reported in the prior week.

                  Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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                  More Death Data
                  Testing


                  The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 8.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for October 21–27, 2022, was 346,958, down 9.8% from 384,686 for the prior 7 days.

                  976,407,753
                  Total Tests Reported

                  346,958
                  7-Day Average Tests Reported

                  8.8%
                  7-Day Average % Positivity

                  7.9%
                  Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                  +0.91
                  Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                  *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                  COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


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                  More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                  COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,200 testing sites across the country.

                  Currently, about 38% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 12% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 33% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 58% are reporting an increase.

                  For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                  *The virus that causes COVID-19

                  SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


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                  0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                  More Wastewater Data

                  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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                    Interpretive Summary for November 18, 2022


                    View LargerUpdate on COVID-19–Related Deaths


                    Deaths from COVID-19 have substantially decreased in the United States in recent months. This is likely due to high levels of population immunity, either through vaccination or prior infection, as well as improvements in early treatment for patients at risk for severe disease.

                    On November 16, 2022, CDC released a new COVID-19 Data Review: Update on COVID-19–Related Mortality that examines recent and overall trends in COVID-19–related mortality among adults in the United States. Currently, the virus poses the highest risk of COVID-19–related death for older adults (especially those older than age 85 years), people who have underlying medical conditions, people with disabilities, and people who are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccinations.

                    CDC continues to monitor changes in the virus to inform individual and community-level actions. We now have many tools to protect ourselves and those around us who remain at higher risk for severe illness.
                    • COVID-19 vaccines and treatments remain the best lines of defense against severe illness, hospitalization, and death.
                      • Stay up to date on your COVID-19 vaccinations. People of any age who are vaccinated have a lower risk of dying, with the most protection observed among people who have received boosters or additional doses. Use CDC’s booster tool to find out if and when to get your COVID-19 updated (bivalent) booster. Find a vaccine location in your community.
                      • If you are immunocompromised, talk with your healthcare provider about Evusheld, a preventive medication that is given before you get exposed or test positive.*
                      • If you test positive for COVID-19 and are more likely to get very sick, other treatments (such as Paxlovid) can reduce your chances of hospitalization and death.*
                    • People can also protect themselves and others by wearing a mask or respirator, getting tested if needed, staying home if experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, improving ventilation when indoors, and using other layered prevention measures. COVID-19 Community Levels can help you make an informed decision about how to protect yourself and others.

                    Every life lost to COVID-19 is a tragedy and should be a reminder to continue taking precautions to prevent further serious illness and death. As the virus continues to spread and change over time, everyone should continue to take steps to protect themselves and others.

                    See the A Closer Look section for more detailed information from the COVID-19 Data Review: Update on COVID-19–Related Mortality.

                    *Medications to treat COVID-19 must be prescribed by a healthcare provider and started as soon as possible after diagnosis to be effective. Contact a healthcare provider right away to determine if you are eligible for treatment, even if your symptoms are mild. Visit the Treatment Locator to find a location that offers testing and treatment or a pharmacy where you can fill your prescription.

                    Note to Readers: CDC will not publish the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review on Friday, November 25, 2022, due to the Thanksgiving holiday. Publication will resume on Friday, December 2, 2022.


                    What's New
                    COVID-19 Community Levels*


                    As of November 17, 2022, there are 90 (2.8%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 537 (16.7%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,590 (80.4%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents a minor increase (+0.2 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, a minor decrease (-4.3 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a minor increase (+4.1 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 43 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and South Carolina are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                    To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                    *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                    **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                    U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                    View Larger
                    COVID-19 Community Levels
                    Reported Cases


                    As of November 16, 2022, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (40,102) decreased 3.2% compared with the previous 7-day average (41,412). A total of 98,174,364 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of November 16, 2022.

                    Variant Proportions

                    CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending November 19, 2022, estimate the proportion of ten lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and five of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, BA.5.2.6, and BF.11)—BA.4.6, BA.2, and BA.2.75.

                    The predominant Omicron lineage is BQ.1, projected to be 25.5% (95% PI 22.1-29.1%). Additionally, other variants represent 3.1% of circulating viruses, largely composed of the Omicron-derived XBB lineage.

                    See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                    98,174,364
                    Total Cases Reported

                    40,102
                    Current 7-Day Average**

                    41,412
                    Previous 7-Day Average

                    -3.2%
                    Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                    *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                    **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. No historical cases reported at this time.

                    Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


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                    More Case Data
                    Vaccinations

                    COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


                    As of November 16, 2022, 650.8 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 267.5 million people, or 80.6% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 228.2 million people, or 68.7% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

                    650,810,290
                    Vaccine Doses Administered

                    267,476,279
                    People who received at least one dose (80.6% of the U.S. population)

                    228,154,832
                    People who have completed a primary series* (68.7% of the U.S. population)


                    +0.2
                    Percentage point change from last week

                    +0.1%
                    Percentage point change from last week

                    *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                    Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                    7-Day moving average


                    View Larger
                    More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


                    Of those who have completed a primary series, about 113.9 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 35.4 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 48.7% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Booster dose eligibility varies by age and health condition. Learn more about who is eligible.

                    152,791,406
                    Booster Doses Administered

                    113,844,972
                    Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

                    31,178,010
                    Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**

                    50.1%
                    Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

                    46.3%
                    Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

                    +0.2
                    Percentage point change from last week

                    +1.3
                    Percentage point change from last week

                    *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

                    **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

                    COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


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                    More Vaccination Data
                    Hospitalizations

                    New Hospital Admissions


                    The current 7-day daily average for November 9–15, 2022, was 3,308. This is a 4.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (3,460) from November 2–8, 2022.

                    5,516,552
                    Total New Admissions

                    3,444
                    Current 7-Day Average

                    3,460
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    -4.4%
                    Change in 7-Day Average

                    The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                    Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                    View Larger
                    New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                    More Hospital Data
                    COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalization Rates among Infant Ages 6 months and Younger


                    CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that for the week ending October 29, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations for infants ages 6 months and younger, who are not eligible for vaccination, is 13 per 100,000 population—the highest among all pediatric age groups. The rate had, in general, declined from July through September, but in October it began to increase.

                    This new report using COVID-NET data contains additional information on COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among infants ages 6 months and younger.



                    Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Infants Ages 6 Months and Younger


                    View Larger
                    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                    More COVID-NET Data
                    Deaths


                    The current 7-day average of new deaths (317) decreased 5.3% compared with the previous 7-day average (335). As of November 16, 2022, a total of 1,073,115 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                    1,073,115
                    Total Deaths Reported

                    317
                    Current 7-Day Average*

                    335
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    -5.3%

                    Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                    *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 1,037 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were was reported in the current week and 5 were reported in the prior week.

                    Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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                    More Death Data
                    Testing


                    The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 8.3%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for November 4–10, 2022, was 359,953, down 10.0% from 400,073 for the prior 7 days.

                    982,269,493
                    Total Tests Reported

                    359,953
                    7-Day Average Tests Reported

                    8.3%
                    7-Day Average % Positivity

                    8.2%
                    Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                    +0.11
                    Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                    *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                    COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                    View Larger
                    More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                    COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,200 testing sites across the country.

                    Currently, about 48% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 17% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 44% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 50% are reporting an increase.

                    For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                    *The virus that causes COVID-19

                    SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                    View Larger


                    0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                    More Wastewater Data
                    Top of Page

                    A Closer Look

                    The A Closer Look section presents more detailed information for readers who want to learn more about current issues of interest.

                    COVID-19 Data Review: Update on COVID-19–Related Mortality

                    As of November 16, 2022, a total of 1,073,115 deaths due to COVID-19 have been reported in the United States.

                    Each year during 2020–2022, COVID-19 has been identified as the third leading cause of death among U.S. adults, trailing only heart disease and cancer. On November 16, 2022, CDC released a new COVID-19 Data Review: Update on COVID-19–Related Mortality that examines recent and overall trends in COVID-19–related mortality among adults in the United States. Data presented in this report point to a rapid reduction in COVID-19–related mortality in the U.S. population in March 2022, with sustained lower levels from April through early November 2022.

                    Throughout the pandemic, CDC has provided information on COVID-19–related mortality, including data on COVID Data Tracker and in scientific publications. This report builds on previous work and contains preliminary results, as well as pertinent data from previously published analyses, that can improve understanding of COVID-19–related deaths, drive public health action, and inform further scientific inquiry.

                    The report examines six questions. The first page, which includes a summary, report limitations, and top takeaway messages, can be downloaded as a PDF. The full report includes data visualizations and full descriptions of the data sources and findings. Key findings from the report are briefly presented here.

                    Top Takeaway Messages
                    1. There were signs of improvement in COVID-19–related mortality in the United States.
                    2. Vaccines continue to be effective in reducing COVID-19-related mortality.
                    3. Where and how COVID-19–related deaths occur appeared to be changing.
                    4. Improvement is needed to decrease the risk for COVID-19-related mortality.

                    Questions
                    1. 1. Has the risk of COVID-19related mortality changed overall and for specific demographic groups?
                      • Hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 have substantially decreased in the United States in recent months and remained relatively low during April–early November 2022. Outside of the initial waves of COVID-19–related deaths in 2020 and early 2021, which coincided with widespread transmission of the first SARS-CoV-2 variants in the United States, the largest peaks in COVID-19 deaths occurred during the Delta (July–October 2021) and early Omicron periods (January–March 2022). In these periods, a large peak in COVID-19 cases was followed by a peak in COVID-19–associated hospitalizations and, subsequently, large increases in COVID-19related deaths. An increase in COVID-19 cases in July 2022 resulted in proportionally fewer deaths than seen during earlier periods in the pandemic.
                      • From April through September 2022, COVID-19–related mortality rates remained relatively stable; to date, this has been the longest interval during the pandemic in which the COVID-19–related mortality rate was less than 22 deaths per 100,000 for all age groups. However, during this period, 2,000–4,500 COVID-19–related deaths were reported weekly, and a higher number of all-cause deaths occurred in the United States compared to what was expected based on previous years of data (excess deaths).
                      • Adults aged 85 years and older remain at particularly high risk of dying, with the proportion of COVID-19–related deaths accounted for by adults in this age group increasing during April–September 2022 from ~28% to ~40% of COVID-19–related deaths. This is the highest proportion of any age group―despite adults ages 85 years and older accounting for only about 2% of the U.S. population. Throughout the pandemic, the COVID-19–related mortality rate among men has been higher than among women.
                      • During January–April 2022, mortality rates decreased significantly for all race and ethnicity groups among both younger people (under 65 years old) and older adults (ages 65 years and older). Although racial and ethnic disparities in COVID-19–related mortality have decreased over the course of the pandemic, disparities continued to exist.
                    2. 2. How effective are vaccines at reducing the risk of dying due to COVID-19?
                      • COVID-19 vaccines continue to reduce the risk of dying among all age groups, including older adults, with the most protection observed among people with at least 2 booster doses.
                      • Despite changes in circulating variants over time, adults ages 65 years and older who are unvaccinated continue to have a much greater risk of dying from COVID-19 than people who are vaccinated; the same pattern exists for deaths across all age groups. Additional booster doses provide added protection; for example, in August 2022, adults aged 50 years and older with at least 2 booster doses had 3 times lower risk of dying from COVID-19 than adults of the same age with one booster dose.
                    3. 3. Is COVID-19 the underlying (primary) cause of all reported COVID-19–related deaths?
                      • The majority of COVID-19related deaths continue to have COVID-19 listed as the underlying (primary) cause; however, over time a larger proportion of COVID-19-related deaths have COVID-19 listed as a contributing cause of death rather than the underlying cause. This pattern is occurring across both younger and older age groups and means that people are now more likely to have another health condition listed as their underlying cause of death. During January–September 2022, 77–80% of COVID-19-related deaths had COVID-19 listed as the underlying cause of death, compared to 91–92% of deaths in 2020.
                    4. 4. Where do most COVID-19—related deaths occur?
                      • Although the highest proportion of COVID-19related deaths continue to occur in hospitals, increasingly, these deaths have occurred in other settings such as homes, long-term care facilities and hospice facilities.
                      • During January 2020–April 2022, the majority (57–78%) of COVID-19related deaths among adults aged 65 years and older occurred in the hospital. But since April 2022, inpatient hospital deaths have accounted for less than 50% of COVID-19–related deaths in this age group.
                    5. 5. What do we know about patients who died in the hospital while hospitalized for COVID-19?
                      • The people most at risk of COVID-19–related in-hospital death continue to be older adults (ages 65 years and older), people with underlying medical conditions, people with disabilities, and people who are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccinations.
                      • Risk of dying while hospitalized for COVID-19 declined steeply during March–April 2022 and remained lower through August 2022 compared to rates observed during June 2021–February 2022. The risk of in-hospital death has varied in the periods when the predominant circulating SARS-CoV-2 strains have differed. The Delta variant period (July–October 2021) had the highest crude mortality risk overall compared to during January–June 2022 when the predominant circulating strains were Omicron variants and subvariants. Among patients hospitalized primarily for COVID-19, the proportion requiring intensive medical intervention such as noninvasive mechanical ventilation or invasive medical intervention declined between the Delta period and the January–June 2022 Omicron periods.
                      • COVID-19–related in-hospital deaths are rare (less than 1%) among younger adults; those that do occur are most often among unvaccinated patients. During May–August 2022, among adults aged 18–49 years old who died in-hospital due to COVID-19, 79% were not vaccinated.
                    6. 6. Which evidence-based COVID-19 medications that can reduce COVID-19related mortality are being used, and in which patients?
                      • Use of outpatient COVID-19 medications, like Paxlovid, has increased. Early evidence suggests that hospital admission rates and death rates are lower among those treated with medications compared to those who are not treated. The proportion of COVID-19 patients receiving outpatient COVID-19 medication during April–July 2022 was highest among adults ages 6579 years (~50%).
                      • Findings from a recent study, included in the report, showed racial and ethnic disparities in outpatient COVID-19 treatment through July 2022. During April–July 2022, the percentage of COVID-19 patients ages 20 years and older treated with Paxlovid was 36% lower among Black patients than among White patients, and Hispanic patients were 30% less likely to receive it than non-Hispanic patients. The study found that these disparities existed among all age groups and patients with immunocompromising conditions.
                    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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                    • #70


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                      Interpretive Summary for December 02, 2022


                      View LargerAn Effective Boost


                      New data recently released by CDC highlight the importance of an updated (bivalent) booster for everyone ages 5 years and older. The report found that an updated (bivalent) booster provides additional protection from COVID-19 illness in people who previously received two or more doses of an original (monovalent) mRNA vaccine. Getting the updated (bivalent) booster restored protection that had decreased over time since receiving the last vaccine dose.

                      Additionally, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker now includes early data showing that people ages 12 years and older who got an updated (bivalent) booster were 15 times less likely to die from COVID-19 compared with people who were not vaccinated. CDC will continue to evaluate how well the updated (bivalent) booster is performing and will provide that information as it becomes available.

                      COVID-19 spread has increased the last two winters, so stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccines this holiday season to prevent serious illness and death. The updated (bivalent) booster protects against the original strain of the virus and the currently circulating Omicron BA.4 and BA.5-related lineages and sublineages. Getting one updated (bivalent) booster is recommended for all people ages 5 years and older if it has been at least two months since their last COVID-19 dose (either primary series or original monovalent booster).


                      What's New
                      COVID-19 Community Levels*


                      As of December 1, 2022, there are 182 (5.7%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 799 (24.8%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 2,234 (69.5%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents an increase (+2.0 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, an increase (+6.5 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a decrease (-8.5 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 46 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. District of Columbia, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Vermont are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                      To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                      *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                      **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                      U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                      View Larger
                      COVID-19 Community Levels
                      Reported Cases


                      As of November 30, 2022, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (43,300) decreased 1.2% compared with the previous 7-day average (43,837). A total of 98,777,220 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of December 30, 2022.

                      Variant Proportions

                      CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending December 3, 2022, estimate the proportion of lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and four of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, and BA.5.2.6)—BA.4.6,and XBB. XBB is a recombinant of two BA.2 sublineages.

                      The two predominant Omicron lineages are BQ.1.1, projected to be 31.9% (95% PI 29.7-34.3%) and BQ.1, projected to be 30.9% (95% PI 28.7-33.3%) nationally. Additionally, COVID Data Tracker shows XBB; it is projected to be 5.5% (95% PI 2.7-10.6%).

                      See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                      98,777,220
                      Total Cases Reported

                      43,300
                      Current 7-Day Average**

                      43,837
                      Previous 7-Day Average

                      -1.2%
                      Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                      *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                      **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. No historical cases reported at this time.

                      Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


                      View Larger
                      More Case Data
                      Vaccinations

                      COVID-19 Vaccine Primary Series


                      As of November 30, 2022, 655.3 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 267.3 million people, or 80.5% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 228.4 million people, or 68.8% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.*

                      655,280,140
                      Vaccine Doses Administered

                      267,346,533
                      People who received at least one dose (80.5% of the U.S. population)

                      228,369,460
                      People who have completed a primary series* (68.8% of the U.S. population)


                      -0.2
                      Percentage point change from last week

                      +0.0%
                      Percentage point change from last week

                      *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                      Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                      7-Day moving average


                      View Larger
                      More Vaccination DataCOVID-19 Vaccine Boosters


                      Of those who have completed a primary series, about 114.8 million people have received a booster dose,* and more than 39.7 million people have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. But 48.3% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. Learn more about who is eligible.

                      155,987,843
                      Booster Doses Administered

                      114,779,848
                      Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose*

                      32,421,025
                      Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose**


                      50.4%
                      Percentage of the Population ≥ 5 Years of Age with a 1st booster dose

                      47.9%
                      Percentage of the Population ≥ 50 Years of Age with a 2nd booster dose

                      +0.2
                      Percentage point change from last week

                      +0.8
                      Percentage point change from last week

                      *Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

                      **Represents the number of people who have completed a primary series and have received two subsequent doses of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received two booster doses and people who received one additional dose and one booster dose.

                      COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


                      View Larger
                      More Vaccination Data
                      Hospitalizations

                      New Hospital Admissions


                      The current 7-day daily average for November 23–29, 2022, was 4,201. This is a 17.6% increase from the prior 7-day average (3,572) from November 16–22, 2022.

                      5,571,393
                      Total New Admissions

                      4,201
                      Current 7-Day Average

                      3,572
                      Prior 7-Day Average

                      +17.6%
                      Change in 7-Day Average

                      The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                      Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                      View Larger
                      New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                      More Hospital Data
                      COVID-NET: Recent Trends in Hospitalization Rates among Adults and Children (All Ages)


                      CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations have remained relatively stable for more than two months. Hospitalization rates among people of all ages declined from a recent peak of 9.6 per 100,000 population for the week ending July 30, 2022, and have remained below 6.0 per 100,000 population since the week ending September 17, 2022.

                      Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults and Children (All Ages)


                      View Larger
                      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                      More COVID-NET Data
                      Deaths


                      The current 7-day average of new deaths (254) decreased 32.4% compared with the previous 7-day average (376). As of November 30, 2022, a total of 1,077,303 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                      1,077,303
                      Total Deaths Reported

                      254
                      Current 7-Day Average*

                      376
                      Prior 7-Day Average

                      -32.4%
                      Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                      *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 1,037 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                      Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


                      View Larger
                      More Death Data
                      Testing


                      The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 10.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for November 18–24, 2022, was 315,090, down 19.1% from 389,670 for the prior 7 days.

                      987,669,827
                      Total Tests Reported

                      315,090
                      7-Day Average Tests Reported

                      10.7%
                      7-Day Average % Positivity

                      8.7%
                      Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                      +2.01
                      Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                      *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                      COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                      View Larger
                      More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                      COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,200 testing sites across the country.

                      Currently, about 50% of the country is reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 22% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 34% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 58% are reporting an increase.

                      For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                      *The virus that causes COVID-19

                      SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                      View Larger


                      0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                      More Wastewater Data

                      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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                      • #71


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                        Interpretive Summary for December 09, 2022


                        View LargerTreat Early, Prevent Hospitalization


                        If you test positive and are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, treatments are available. In a new CDC study, adults who were prescribed Paxlovid for mild to moderate COVID-19 were over 50% less likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19. CDC researchers assessed electronic health record data and found that receiving Paxlovid was associated with a lower overall hospitalization rate across age groups, whether they were vaccinated or not. Paxlovid is recommended for people who are more likely to get very sick and hospitalized with COVID-19, especially older adults and those with multiple medical conditions, regardless of vaccination status.

                        As we enter the holiday season, it’s important to take steps to protect yourself and others from serious illness with COVID-19, including staying up to date on COVID-19 vaccines and promptly talking to your healthcare provider about treatment options if you test positive for COVID-19.

                        If you have COVID-19 symptoms:
                        • Test : Use a self-test, locate a test site, or find a Test to Treat location.
                        • Talk: If you test positive, talk to a healthcare professional to determine if you are eligible for treatment, even if your symptoms are mild right now.
                        • Treat: Start treatment within five days of developing symptoms.

                        Note to Readers: Paxlovid is not a replacement for COVID-19 vaccination. COVID-19 vaccination makes you much less likely to get very sick. Still, some vaccinated people, especially those ages 65 years or older or who have other risk factors for severe disease, may benefit from treatment if they get COVID-19. A healthcare provider will help decide which treatment, if any, is right for you.


                        What's New
                        COVID-19 Community Levels*


                        As of December 8, 2022, there are 298 (9.3%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,131 (35.1%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 1,787 (55.5%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, this represents an increase (+3.6 percentage points) in the number of high-level counties, an increase (+10.3 percentage points) in the number of medium-level counties, and a decrease (-13.8 percentage points) in the number of low-level counties. Overall, 48 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. The District of Columbia, Hawaii, Maine and New Hampshire, are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                        To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                        *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                        **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                        U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                        View Larger
                        COVID-19 Community Levels
                        Reported Cases


                        As of December 7, 2022, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (65,569) increased 49.6% compared with the previous 7-day average (43,825). A total of 99,241,649 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of December 7, 2022.

                        Variant Proportions

                        CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending December 10, 2022, estimate the proportion of lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and four of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, and BA.5.2.6)—BA.4.6, and XBB. XBB is a recombinant of two BA.2 sublineages.

                        The two predominant Omicron lineages and the two that are increasing this week are BQ.1.1, projected to be 36.8% (95% PI 34.1-39.6%) and BQ.1, projected to be 31.1% (95% PI 29.0-33.4%) nationally. All other lineages (BA.5, BF.7, XBB, BN.1, BA.5.2.6, and BA.4.6) are decreasing in proportion this week compared to last.

                        See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                        99,241,649
                        Total Cases Reported

                        65,569
                        Current 7-Day Average**

                        43,825
                        Previous 7-Day Average

                        +49.6%
                        Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                        *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                        **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. No historical cases reported at this time.

                        Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


                        View Larger
                        More Case Data
                        Vaccinations


                        As of December 7, 2022, 657.9 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 228.6 million people, or 68.9% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.* More than 42.0 million people, or 13.5% of the U.S. population ages 5 years and older, have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                        657,927,289
                        Vaccine Doses Administered

                        42,195,019
                        Updated (Bivalent) Booster Doses Administered

                        228,604,758
                        People who have completed a primary series* (68.9% of the U.S. population)

                        42,017,288
                        People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster (13.5% of the U.S. population)

                        +0.1
                        Percentage point change from last week

                        +0.8%
                        Percentage point change from last week

                        *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                        Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                        7-Day moving average


                        View Larger
                        COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


                        View Larger
                        More Vaccination Data
                        Hospitalizations

                        New Hospital Admissions


                        The current 7-day daily average for November 30–December 6, 2022, was 4,844. This is a 13.8% increase from the prior 7-day average (4,256) from November 23–29, 2022.

                        5,605,899
                        Total New Admissions

                        4,844
                        Current 7-Day Average

                        4,256
                        Prior 7-Day Average

                        +13.8%
                        Change in 7-Day Average

                        The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                        Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                        View Larger
                        New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                        More Hospital Data
                        COVID-NET: Recent Trends in Hospitalization Rates among Adults and Children (All Ages)


                        CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations remain elevated among adults ages 65 years and older, the age group with the highest rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalization. Among adults ages 65 years and older, rates have remained elevated for more than two months, with hospitalization rates ranging from 21.1–26.2 per 100,000 between September 10 and November 19, 2022.

                        Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                        View Larger
                        The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                        More COVID-NET Data
                        Deaths


                        The current 7-day average of new deaths (426) increased 61.7% compared with the previous 7-day average (263). As of December 7, 2022, a total of 1,080,472 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                        1,080,472
                        Total Deaths Reported

                        426
                        Current 7-Day Average*

                        263
                        Prior 7-Day Average

                        +61.7%
                        Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                        *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 1,037 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                        Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


                        View Larger
                        More Death Data
                        Testing


                        The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 11.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for November 25–December 1, 2022, was 330,003, down 8.7% from 361,513 for the prior 7 days.

                        990,581,371
                        Total Tests Reported

                        330,003
                        7-Day Average Tests Reported

                        11.7%
                        7-Day Average % Positivity

                        10.7%
                        Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                        +0.96
                        Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                        *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                        COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                        View Larger
                        More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                        COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,300 testing sites across the country.

                        Currently, about 64% of sites across the country are reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 38% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 27% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 65% are reporting an increase.

                        For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                        *The virus that causes COVID-19

                        SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                        View Larger


                        0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                        More Wastewater Data

                        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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                        • #72


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                          Interpretive Summary for December 16, 2022
                          ’Tis the Season for Good Health


                          In the midst of the holiday season, U.S. COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths have increased in recent weeks. More than 44% of U.S. counties are experiencing medium to high COVID-19 Community Levels. At the same time, this cold and flu season has been a severe one. The trio of COVID-19, flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is continuing to stress the healthcare system, resulting in decreased hospital capacity and staffing shortages.

                          Vaccination remains the best way to stay protected against severe infection from COVID-19 and flu, protect loved ones, and keep our communities safe. But uptake of the COVID-19 updated (bivalent) booster has been low—150 million people ages 5 years and older are eligible for the updated booster but have not yet gotten it. Among adults ages 65 years and older, who are at highest risk of becoming severely ill with COVID-19, 28 million people are eligible but have not yet gotten an updated booster. Two new CDC studies1,2 show that these vaccines can significantly reduce people’s risk of getting hospitalized for COVID-19. With rising COVID-19 rates, now is the time to get your booster if you haven’t already.

                          CDC recommends that everyone who is eligible get an updated (bivalent) COVID-19 booster. They’re safe, effective, and provide extra protection even if you’ve already gotten two or more doses of the original vaccine. It’s never too late. Find a vaccine.

                          People can also protect themselves and others by wearing a mask or respirator in indoor public settings, improving ventilation when indoors, and using other layered prevention measures. If you have COVID-19 symptoms, get tested. If you test positive, talk to your healthcare provider about treatment options. COVID-19 Community Levels can help you make an informed decision about how best to protect yourself and others based on the latest information. Stay safe this holiday season.

                          Note to Readers: CDC will not publish COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review on December 23, 2022, or December 30, 2022. Publication will resume on January 6, 2023. To find the latest COVID-19 data, visit CDC’s COVID Data Tracker.


                          What's New
                          1. Early Estimates of Bivalent mRNA Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing COVID-19-Associated Emergency Department or Urgent Care Encounters and Hospitalizations among Immunocompetent Adults — VISION Network, 9 States, September–November 2022
                          2. Early Estimates of Bivalent mRNA Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing COVID-19–Associated Hospitalization Among Immunocompetent Adults Aged ≥65 Years — IVY Network, 18 States, September 8–November 30, 2022

                          COVID-19 Community Levels*


                          As of December 15, 2022, there are 295 (9.2%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,124 (34.9%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 1,789 (55.6%) counties with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, there were no changes in the proportion of low, medium or high level counties. Overall, 50 out of 52 jurisdictions** had high- or medium-level counties this week. The District of Columbia and Hawaii are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                          To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                          *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                          **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                          U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                          View Larger
                          COVID-19 Community Levels
                          Reported Cases


                          As of December 14, 2022, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (65,067) decreased 2.9% compared with the previous 7-day average (67,034). A total of 99,705,095 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of December 14, 2022.

                          Variant Proportions

                          CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending December 17, 2022, estimate the proportion of lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and five of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, BF.7, BN.1, and BA.5.2.6)—BA.4.6, and XBB. XBB is a recombinant of two BA.2 sublineages.

                          The primary Omicron lineages this week are BQ.1.1, projected to be 38.4% (95% PI 35.7-41.3%), BQ.1, projected to be 30.7% (95% PI 28.7-32.8%), XBB, projected to be 7.2% (95% PI 4.2-11.9%), and BN.1, projected to be 4.1% (95% PI 3.5-4.7%) nationally. This week, BQ.1.1 and XBB are increasing in proportion. All other lineages (BQ.1, BA.5, BF.7, BN.1, BA.5.2.6, and BA.4.6) are decreasing in proportion this week compared to last.

                          See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                          99,705,095
                          Total Cases Reported

                          65,067
                          Current 7-Day Average**

                          67,034
                          Previous 7-Day Average

                          -2.9%
                          Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                          *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                          **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. No historical cases reported at this time.

                          Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


                          View Larger
                          More Case Data
                          Vaccinations


                          As of December 14, 2022, 660.4 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 228.8 million people, or 68.9% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.* More than 44.2 million people, or 14.1% of the U.S. population ages 5 years and older, have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                          660,400,812
                          Vaccine Doses Administered

                          44,356,082
                          U
                          pdated (Bivalent) Booster Doses Administered

                          228,831,995
                          People who have completed a primary series* (68.9% of the U.S. population)

                          44,154,294
                          People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster (14.1% of the U.S. population)

                          +0.0
                          Percentage point change from last week

                          +0.6%
                          Percentage point change from last week

                          *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                          Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                          7-Day moving average


                          View Larger
                          COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


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                          More Vaccination Data
                          Hospitalizations

                          New Hospital Admissions


                          The current 7-day daily average for December 7–13, 2022, was 5,010. This is a 2.3% increase from the prior 7-day average (4,899) from November 30–December 6, 2022.

                          5,641,541
                          Total New Admissions

                          5,010
                          Current 7-Day Average

                          4,899
                          Prior 7-Day Average

                          +2.3%
                          Change in 7-Day Average

                          The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                          Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                          View Larger
                          New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                          More Hospital Data
                          COVID-NET: Recent Trends in Hospitalization Rates among Adults and Children (All Ages)


                          CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that pediatric rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations remain highest among young children younger than age 6 months. For the week ending November 26, 2022, hospitalization rates for this age group are 15.7 per 100,000 population, compared with 2.6, 0.5, and 0.5 per 100,000 population for children ages 6 months–4 years, 5–11 years and 12–17 years, respectively.

                          Weekly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Children 0–17 Years


                          View Larger
                          The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                          More COVID-NET Data
                          Deaths


                          The current 7-day average of new deaths (386) decreased 13.2% compared with the previous 7-day average (445). As of December 14, 2022, a total of 1,083,279 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                          1,083,279
                          Total Deaths Reported

                          386
                          Current 7-Day Average*

                          445
                          Prior 7-Day Average

                          -13.2%
                          Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                          *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 3,479 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                          Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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                          More Death Data
                          Testing


                          The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 12.2%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for December 2–8, 2022, was 371,659, down 7.9% from 403,657 for the prior 7 days.

                          993,911,401
                          Total Tests Reported

                          371,659
                          7-Day Average Tests Reported

                          12.2%
                          7-Day Average % Positivity

                          11.8%
                          Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                          +0.38
                          Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                          *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                          COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                          View Larger
                          More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                          COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,200 testing sites across the country.

                          Currently, about 80% of sites across the country are reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 53% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 43% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 46% are reporting an increase.

                          For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                          *The virus that causes COVID-19

                          SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                          View Larger


                          0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                          https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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                          • #73


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                            Interpretive Summary for January 6, 2023
                            New Year, Same Variant



                            Nowcast estimated variant proportions,
                            United States: 10/8/22―1/7/23

                            CDC’s goal is to provide actionable information to public health professionals and the American public. Because Omicron sublineage XBB.1.5 data were displayed separately from XBB data on COVID Data Tracker’s Nowcast projections for the first time last week, we thought it would be helpful to explain the different variant proportion information CDC provides. This includes how the Nowcast forecasting tool works—what it is (a projection based on a model that has been accurate over time) versus what it isn’t (a literal, real-time count of variants based on sequenced viruses from people with COVID-19).

                            CDC uses two methods to display variant proportions: weighted estimates and Nowcast estimates. Weighted estimates for each circulating lineage are very precise, but it takes two to three weeks for sample collection, specimen treatment, shipping, and analysis to occur. CDC uses Nowcast to forecast variant proportions before the weighted estimates are available.

                            Sublineages with weighted estimates less than 1% of all circulating variants are combined with their parent lineage for reporting of both weighted and Nowcast estimates. Variant proportion estimates for XBB.1.5 were first separated from its parent (XBB) the week of December 31, when its most recent weighted estimate (based on information from the week of December 10) rose to about 4%. Because of its fast growth rate, its Nowcast estimate was projected to be around 41% by the end of December.

                            But projections can be uncertain when a variant is just beginning to spread. When Nowcast predicted XBB.1.5 at 41%, there was a wide prediction range of about 23% to 61%. Since then, more data have come in from mid-December, as well as additional data delayed by the holidays. As a result, the projection for the week ending December 31 was revised to 18%, but with a higher degree of certainty (prediction range of 9% to 33%), followed by an increase to 28% for the most recent week of January 6 (prediction range of 14% to 47%).

                            These findings demonstrate that XBB.1.5 is spreading quickly. At this time, CDC’s COVID-19 guidance remains the same about how people can best protect themselves from serious illness. CDC will continue to investigate the ways in which XBB.1.5 may be different from other Omicron lineages and will continue to update COVID Data Tracker’s Variant Proportions page on a weekly basis.


                            What's New
                            COVID-19 Community Levels*


                            As of January 5, 2023, there are 628 (19.5%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,351 (41.9%) with a medium Community Level, and 1,241 (38.5%) with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, the number of counties, districts, or territories in the high level increased by 10.6%, in the medium level increased by 1.8%, and in the low level decreased by 12.4%. Overall, 49 out of 52 jurisdictions had high- or medium-level counties this week. Hawaii, Maine, and Wyoming are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                            To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                            *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                            **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                            U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                            View Larger
                            COVID-19 Community Levels
                            Reported Cases


                            As of January 4, 2023, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (67,243) increased 16.2% compared with the previous 7-day average (57,847). A total of 101,094,670 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of January 4, 2023.

                            Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


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                            More Case Data
                            Variant Proportions

                            CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending January 7, 2023, estimate the proportion of lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and three of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, and BF.7) and BA.2 sublineages BA.2.75, BN.1, XBB, a recombinant of two BA.2 sublineages, and a newly broken out XBB sublineage, XBB.1.5.

                            The most prevalent Omicron lineages this week are BQ.1.1, projected to be 34.4% (95% PI 26.7-43%); XBB.1.5, projected to be 27.6% (95% PI 14.0-46.5); and BQ.1, projected to be 21.4% (95% PI 16.1-27.7%). XBB, BA.5, BN.1, BF.7, and BA.2.75 are all projected to be between 1% and 5% of circulating viruses.

                            There are currently major regional differences in the proportions of circulating lineages. XBB.1.5 is projected to comprise >70% of viruses in regions 1 and 2, but <5% of circulating viruses in regions 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. XBB.1.5 is growing in proportion. All other virus lineages are predicted to have very slow or no growth in proportion.

                            See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                            101,094,670
                            Total Cases Reported

                            67,243
                            Current 7-Day Average**

                            57,847
                            Previous 7-Day Average

                            +16.2%
                            Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                            *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                            **Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 21,397 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none in the prior week.


                            View Larger
                            Vaccinations


                            As of January 4, 2023, 665.1 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 229.3 million people, or 69.1% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.* More than 48.2 million people, or 15.4% of the U.S. population ages 5 years and older, have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                            665,076,272
                            Vaccine Doses Administered

                            48,469,426
                            Updated (Bivalent) Booster Doses Administered

                            229,254,623
                            People who have completed a primary series* (69.1% of the U.S. population)

                            48,229,842
                            People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster (15.4% of the U.S. population)

                            +0.2
                            Percentage point change from last week

                            +1.3%
                            Percentage point change from last week

                            *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                            Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                            7-Day moving average


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                            COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


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                            More Vaccination Data
                            Hospitalizations

                            New Hospital Admissions


                            The current 7-day daily average for December 28, 2022–January 3, 2023, was 6,519. This is a 16.1% increase from the prior 7-day average (5,613) from December 21–27, 2022.

                            5,764,657
                            Total New Admissions

                            6,519
                            Current 7-Day Average

                            5,613
                            Prior 7-Day Average

                            +16.1%
                            Change in 7-Day Average

                            The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                            Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                            View Larger
                            New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                            More Hospital Data
                            Hospitalization Rates by Vaccination Status among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                            CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that in November 2022, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations for unvaccinated adults ages 65 years and older was 13.5 times higher than for those who had received an updated (bivalent) booster dose. The rate for those who had been vaccinated but had not received an updated (bivalent) booster was 2.5 times higher than for those who had received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                            Monthly Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                            View Larger
                            The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                            More COVID-NET Data
                            Deaths


                            The current 7-day average of new deaths (390) increased 8.3% compared with the previous 7-day average (360). As of January 4, 2023, a total of 1,091,184 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                            1,091,184
                            Total Deaths Reported

                            390
                            Current 7-Day Average*

                            360
                            Prior 7-Day Average

                            +8.3%
                            Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                            *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 3,752 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                            Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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                            More Death Data
                            Testing


                            The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 16.0%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for December 23-29, 2022, was 271,509, down 31.4% from 395,910 for the prior 7 days.

                            1,002,298,528
                            Total Tests Reported

                            271,509
                            7-Day Average Tests Reported

                            16.0%
                            7-Day Average % Positivity

                            14.2%
                            Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                            +1.85
                            Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                            *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                            COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                            View Larger
                            More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                            COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,300 testing sites across the country.

                            Currently, about 80% of sites across the country are reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 58% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 33% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 56% are reporting an increase.

                            For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                            *The virus that causes COVID-19

                            SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                            View Larger


                            0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                            https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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                            • #74


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                              Interpretive Summary for January 20, 2023
                              A Better Data Picture


                              For the past two years, COVID-19 has dominated respiratory disease activity in the United States, with other respiratory viruses circulating at lower levels than usual. But that trend has changed this year—flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been on the rise, especially among children. The combination of flu, RSV, and COVID-19 has strained healthcare systems this fall and winter. Therefore, it is important to continue to track COVID-19 on its own, but also in the context of these other respiratory illnesses and hospital use overall.

                              CDC recently released three new tools that allow people to see hospitalization and emergency department data and compare trends across seasons and by respiratory disease type.
                              • COVID Data Tracker’s Hospital Capacity and Utilization page is a centralized location for hospital-related data that is updated daily. It tracks overall inpatient bed occupancy, COVID-19 inpatient bed occupancy, overall ICU bed occupancy, and COVID-19 ICU bed occupancy, by state and hospital bed type (adult and pediatric).
                              • The Respiratory Virus Hospitalization Surveillance Network (RESP-NET) interactive dashboard displays data on respiratory virus-associated hospitalizations. It’s updated weekly to help public health professionals visualize trends in virus circulation, estimate disease burden, and respond to outbreaks.
                              • The National Emergency Department Visits for COVID-19, Influenza, and Respiratory Syncytial Virus dashboard, which is updated weekly, displays data on emergency department patient visits with diagnosed COVID-19, influenza, or RSV. By tracking patients in emergency departments with these respiratory virus infections, public health professionals can detect unusual levels of certain respiratory illnesses, which can serve as an early warning system for troubling increases or outbreaks.

                              Tracking hospitalizations and emergency department visits overall and associated with respiratory viruses can help public health officials detect, understand, and monitor health events and strain on our healthcare system. It can also help people make decisions such as choosing to mask in public to protect themselves and others from respiratory illness, including COVID-19.


                              What's New
                              COVID-19 Community Levels*


                              As of January 19, 2023, there are 196 (6.1%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 1,010 (31.4%) with a medium Community Level, and 2,011 (62.5%) with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, the number of counties, districts, or territories in the high level decreased by 7.5%, in the medium level decreased by 6.9%, and in the low level increased by 14.4%. Overall, 48 out of 52 jurisdictions had high- or medium-level counties this week. Arizona, Washington, Nevada, and Utah are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                              To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                              *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                              **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                              U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


                              View Larger
                              COVID-19 Community Levels
                              Reported Cases


                              As of January 18, 2023, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (47,459) decreased 23.9% compared with the previous 7-day average (62,397). A total of 101,873,730 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of January 18, 2023.

                              101,873,730
                              Total Cases Reported

                              47,459
                              Current 7-Day Average*

                              62,397
                              Previous 7-Day Average

                              -23.9%
                              Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                              *Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 21,397 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none in the prior week.

                              Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


                              View Larger
                              More Case Data
                              COVID-19 Variants

                              CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending January 21, 2023, estimate the proportion of lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: BA.5—and three of its sublineages (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, and BF.7)—and BA.2 sublineages BA.2.75, BN.1, XBB, and XBB.1.5.

                              The most prevalent Omicron lineages this week are XBB.1.5, projected to be 49.1% (95% PI 37.5-60.8%), and BQ.1.1, projected to be 26.9% (95% PI 20.9-33.9%). BQ.1, XBB, BA.5, BN.1, BF.7, and BA.2.75 are all projected to be between 1% and 15% of circulating viruses.

                              XBB.1.5 is growing in proportion in all HHS regions. All other virus lineages are predicted to have very slow or no growth in proportion.

                              See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.



                              *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.


                              View Larger
                              Vaccinations


                              As of January 18, 2023, 667.8 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 229.5 million people, or 69.1% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.* More than 41 million people, or 19.6% of the eligible U.S. population ages 5 years and older, have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                              667,815,331
                              Vaccine Doses Administered

                              50,959,514
                              Updated (Bivalent) Booster Doses Administered

                              229,508,443
                              People who have completed a primary series* (69.1% of the U.S. population)

                              41,080,464
                              People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster (19.6% of the eligible U.S. population)

                              0.0
                              Percentage point change from last week

                              +0.3
                              Percentage point change from last week

                              *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                              Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                              7-Day moving average


                              View Larger
                              COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


                              View Larger
                              More Vaccination Data
                              Hospitalizations

                              New Hospital Admissions


                              The current 7-day daily average for January 10–16, 2023, was 5,014. This is a 16.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (5,997) from January 3–9, 2023.

                              5,834,648
                              Total New Admissions

                              5,014
                              Current 7-Day Average

                              5,997
                              Prior 7-Day Average

                              -16.4%
                              Change in 7-Day Average

                              The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                              Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                              View Larger
                              New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                              More Hospital Data
                              RESP-NET: COVID-19


                              CDC’s Respiratory Virus Hospitalization Surveillance Network (RESP-NET) comprises three networks that conduct population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed hospitalizations associated with COVID-19, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and influenza among children and adults. The rates presented on the RESP-NET interactive dashboard can be used to follow trends and comparisons of COVID-19, RSV, and influenza-associated hospitalization rates in different demographic groups, including by age, sex, race and ethnicity, and across seasons.

                              RESP-NET shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among adults 65 years and older are likely increasing, with a rate of 44.3 per 100,000 population for the week ending December 31, 2022.

                              Weekly Rates of Respiratory Virus-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                              View Larger
                              The dashed lines for the current season indicate potential reporting delays and interpretation of trends should exclude data from recent weeks. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET), a RESP-NET platform, is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 13 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race and ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                              More COVID-NET Data
                              Deaths


                              The current 7-day average of new deaths (565) decreased 6.1% compared with the previous 7-day average (601). As of January 18, 2023, a total of 1,099,866 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                              1,099,866
                              Total Deaths Reported

                              565
                              Current 7-Day Average*

                              601
                              Prior 7-Day Average

                              -6.1%
                              Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                              *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 3,838 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and 86 were reported in the prior week.

                              Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


                              View Larger
                              More Death Data
                              Testing


                              The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is decreasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 12.3%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for January 6–12, 2023, was 306,307, down 11.6% from 346,677 for the prior 7 days.

                              1,007,362,591
                              Total Tests Reported

                              306,307
                              7-Day Average Tests Reported

                              12.3%
                              7-Day Average % Positivity

                              13.6%
                              Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                              -1.27
                              Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                              *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                              COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


                              View Larger
                              More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                              COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 980 testing sites across the country.

                              Currently, about 46% of sites across the country are reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 48% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 61% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 28% are reporting an increase.

                              For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                              *The virus that causes COVID-19

                              SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


                              View Larger


                              0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                              More Wastewater Data

                              https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.html

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                              • #75


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                                Interpretive Summary for January 27, 2023
                                Counting COVID-19 Deaths


                                Accurate, transparent, and accessible data are critical to understanding any illness, outbreak, or public health threat. CDC’s goal is to provide actionable information to public health professionals and the American public. However, CDC recognizes that misunderstandings about COVID-19 death data have led to claims that COVID-19 deaths in the United States are being overcounted. In this week’s issue, we will clarify how hospitalization and death data are collected and reported.

                                The COVID-19 hospitalization data that CDC displays on the COVID Data Tracker include all hospital patients who test positive for COVID-19, regardless of why they’re in the hospital. There are three general categories of patients hospitalized for COVID-19:
                                • because of COVID-19
                                • for another condition that was likely made worse by having COVID-19
                                • for non-COVID-19 reasons but tested positive for COVID-19 on routine testing when admitted to the hospital (“incidental” COVID-19)

                                COVID-19 death data are tracked differently—they include only the deaths in which COVID-19 played a meaningful role. CDC gets these data from health departments in weekly reports, which provide an early look at death trends, and through death certificates, which are more reliable, but which also take time to collect and report. There are two types of causes listed on death certificates:
                                • underlying (primary): COVID-19 was the main reason the person died.
                                • contributing (secondary): Another condition is listed as the underlying cause but COVID-19 contributed to the death. For example, the person had congestive heart failure and COVID-19 put too much stress on an already weakened heart.

                                People who happen to have COVID-19 at the time of their death but it is unrelated to their death—for example, someone who dies in a car accident—should not have COVID-19 listed on their death certificates.

                                Death data are not perfect, and errors and misclassifications can occasionally happen. CDC and its National Center for Health Statistics are constantly reviewing incoming data, verifying it with state vital records offices, and ensuring standard and accurate death certificate reporting. Over 1 million deaths in the United States due to COVID-19 have been reported since the start of the pandemic, and these deaths should not be downplayed. Each death is a tragic loss that should be remembered as a person rather than a statistic.


                                What's New
                                COVID-19 Community Levels*


                                As of January 25, 2023, there are 118 (3.7%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 855 (26.6%) with a medium Community Level, and 2,242 (69.6%) with a low Community Level. Compared with last week, the number of counties, districts, or territories in the high level decreased by 2.4%, in the medium level decreased by 4.8%, and in the low level increased by 7.2%. Overall, 48 out of 52 jurisdictions had high- or medium-level counties this week. Arizona, Nevada, Washington, and the District of Columbia are the only jurisdictions to have all counties at low Community Levels.

                                To check your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID Data Tracker. To learn which prevention measures are recommended based on your COVID-19 Community Level, visit COVID-19 Community Level and COVID-19 Prevention.

                                *CDC recommends use of COVID-19 Community Levels to determine the impact of COVID-19 on communities and to take action. CDC also provides Community Transmission Levels to describe the amount of COVID-19 spread within each county. Healthcare facilities use Community Transmission Levels to determine infection control interventions.

                                **Includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

                                U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County


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                                COVID-19 Community Levels
                                Reported Cases


                                As of January 25, 2023, the current 7-day average of weekly new cases (42,163) decreased 11.3% compared with the previous 7-day average (47,515). A total of 102,171,644 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of January 25, 2023.

                                102,171,644
                                Total Cases Reported

                                42,163
                                Current 7-Day Average*

                                47,515
                                Previous 7-Day Average

                                -11.3%
                                Change in 7-Day Average since Previous Period

                                *Historical cases are excluded from weekly new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 21,397 historical cases reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none in the prior week.

                                Weekly Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC


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                                More Case DataCOVID-19 Variants


                                CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending January 27, 2023, estimate the proportion of these lineages designated as Omicron with estimates above 1%: XBB.1.5, BQ.1.1, BQ.1, XBB, BN.1, and CH.1.1

                                XBB.1.5 is predicted to be circulating above 50% nationally for the first time this week. It is projected to be at approximately 60% (95% PI 51.5-70.3%). The second most prevalent lineage is BQ.1.1, projected to be at approximately 22% (95% PI 16.6-27.9%).

                                BQ.1, XBB, CH.1.1, and BN.1 are all projected to be between 1% and 10% of circulating lineages.

                                XBB.1.5 is growing in proportion in all HHS regions. All other virus lineages are predicted to have very slow or no growth in proportion.

                                Due to its international increase in variant proportion, estimates for CH.1.1 will be broken out this week on the COVID-19 Data Tracker. It was previously aggregated with its parent lineage, BA.2.75.

                                See COVID Data Tracker for the proportions of all relevant lineages currently circulating.

                                *CDC uses Nowcast projections to predict current variant proportions circulating in the United States. The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.


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                                Vaccinations


                                As of January 25, 2023, 668.8 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 229.6 million people, or 69.2% of the total U.S. population, have completed a primary series.* More than 41.6 million people, or 19.9% of the eligible U.S. population ages 5 years and older, have received an updated (bivalent) booster dose.

                                668,814,259
                                Vaccine Doses Administered

                                51,769,310
                                Updated (Bivalent) Booster Doses Administered**

                                229,619,755
                                People who have completed a primary series* (69.2% of the U.S. population)

                                41,692,919
                                People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster (19.9% of the eligible U.S. population)***

                                +0.1
                                Percentage point change from last week

                                +0.3
                                Percentage point change from last week

                                *Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

                                **Includes all updated (bivalent) booster doses administered regardless of recipient eligibility.

                                ***Includes only recipients who are eligible to receive an updated (bivalent) booster. Beginning January 20, 2023, the “People who have received an updated (bivalent) booster” count was revised from including all people who received an updated (bivalent) booster to only eligible people who received an updated (bivalent) booster.

                                Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of Administration, United States

                                7-Day moving average


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                                COVID-19 Updated (Bivalent) Booster Dose Administration, United States


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                                More Vaccination Data
                                Hospitalizations

                                New Hospital Admissions


                                The current 7-day daily average for January 18–24, 2023, was 4,216. This is a 13.9% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,897) from January 11–17, 2023.

                                5,869,911
                                Total New Admissions

                                4,216
                                Current 7-Day Average

                                4,897
                                Prior 7-Day Average

                                -13.9%
                                Change in 7-Day Average

                                The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                                Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


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                                New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                                More Hospital Data
                                RESP-NET: COVID-19 Associated Hospitalization Rates among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                                CDC’s Respiratory Virus Hospitalization Surveillance Network (RESP-NET) shows that COVID-19-associated hospitalizations remain elevated among adults 65 years and older, the age group with the highest rate of COVID-19 associated hospitalizations.

                                Since the week ending December 17, 2022, hospitalization rates among this age group have increased. For the week ending January 7, 2023, the rate was 42.1 per 100,000 population.

                                Weekly Rates of Respiratory Virus-Associated Hospitalizations among Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


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                                The dashed lines for the current season indicate potential reporting delays and interpretation of trends should exclude data from recent weeks. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET), a RESP-NET platform, is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 13 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race and ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                                More COVID-NET Data
                                Deaths


                                The current 7-day average of new deaths (537) decreased 4.9% compared with the previous 7-day average (564). As of January 25, 2023, a total of 1,103,615 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

                                1,103,615
                                Total Deaths Reported

                                537
                                Current 7-Day Average*

                                564
                                Prior 7-Day Average

                                -4.9%
                                Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Period

                                *Historical deaths are excluded from the weekly new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 3,838 historical deaths reported retroactively, none were reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

                                Weekly Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC


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                                More Death Data
                                Testing


                                The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 11.6%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for January 13–19, 2023, was 270,603, down 23.5% from 353,560 for the prior 7 days.

                                1,009,778,914
                                Total Tests Reported

                                270,603
                                7-Day Average Tests Reported

                                11.6%
                                7-Day Average % Positivity

                                11.3%
                                Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                                0.29
                                Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                                *Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

                                COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


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                                More Testing DataWastewater Surveillance


                                COVID Data Tracker’s Wastewater Surveillance tab tracks levels, changes, and detections of SARS-CoV-2* viral RNA in wastewater at over 1,200 testing sites across the country.

                                Currently, about 69% of sites across the country are reporting moderate to high SARS-CoV-2 levels in wastewater. About 37% of sites reporting wastewater data are currently seeing some of the highest levels for those sites since December 1, 2021. About 48% of sites are experiencing a decrease in SARS-CoV-2 levels, and about 40% are reporting an increase.

                                For more information on how to use wastewater data, visit CDC’s wastewater surveillance website.

                                *The virus that causes COVID-19

                                SARS-CoV-2 Levels in Wastewater by Site


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                                0% denotes that levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% denotes that levels are the highest they have been at the site.

                                https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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