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Discussion thread: H5N1 avian flu in US Dairy Cows - March 24+ - 10 human cases

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  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    Also - A chicken is a chicken and not a wild bird. Domestic ducks are not wild birds either.

  • sharon sanders
    replied
    Please see:

    USDA Publishes H5N1 Influenza A Virus Genetic Sequences on publicly available site - April 21, 2024

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    No testing for H5N1 will be anonymous. It may not be publicly available information, however.

  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    The US has based its flu pandemic vaccine preparations on H5N1. I believe they have had seed material for an H5N1 for years. Of course, strains are different so I have no idea how well the seed vaccines match any current H5N1 strain.

  • sharon sanders
    replied
    Originally posted by Pathfinder View Post
    USDA confirms cow-to-cow transmission a factor in bird flu spread

    Fargo, ND, USA / The Mighty 790 KFGO | KFGO
    Thomson Reuters
    Apr 19, 2024 | 2:09 PM

    By Tom Polansek

    CHICAGO (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week that cow-to-cow transmission is a factor in the spread of bird flu in dairy herds, but it still does not know exactly how the virus is being moved around.
    ...
    “Those of us that have worked with influenza for a long time were fairly quickly saying, ‘Yep it moves cow to cow,'” Jim Lowe, an associate dean at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, said on Friday. “You can’t explain the epidemiology any other way.”

    Wild migratory birds are believed to be the original source of the virus. But the USDA said its investigation into cow infections “includes some cases where the virus spread was associated with cattle movements between herds.” There is also evidence the virus spread from dairy cattle premises “back into nearby poultry premises through an unknown route,” the department said.

    The USDA said cows shed the virus in milk at high concentrations, so anything that comes in contact with unpasteurized milk may spread the disease. Respiratory transmission is not considered a primary way for the virus to spread in cattle, the department added.
    ...
    By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week that cow-to-cow transmission is a factor in the spread of bird flu in dairy herds, but it still does not know exactly how the virus is being moved around. Farmers...

    Please see:

    USDA - Detection of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) in Dairy Herds: Frequently Asked Questions Updated April 16, 2024

    Leave a comment:


  • Commonground
    replied
    Next pandemic likely to be caused by flu virus, scientists warn
    Sat 20 Apr 2024 04.52 EDT

    -snip-
    An international survey, to be published next weekend, will reveal that 57% of senior disease experts now think that a strain of flu virus will be the cause of the next global outbreak of deadly infectious illness.

    The belief that influenza is the world’s greatest pandemic threat is based on long-term research showing it is constantly evolving and mutating, said Cologne University’s Jon Salmanton-García, who carried out the study. “Each winter influenza appears,” he said. “You could describe these outbreaks as little pandemics. They are more or less controlled because the different strains that cause them are not virulent enough – but that will not necessarily be the case for ever.”

    -snip-
    Details of the survey – which involved inputs from a total of 187 senior scientists – will be revealed at European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) congress in Barcelona next weekend.​..

    Complete article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...cientists-warn

    Leave a comment:


  • Commonground
    replied
    U.S. Could Vaccinate a Fifth of Americans in a Bird Flu Emergency
    April 20, 2024, 4:00 am EDT

    Two clinical trials of the vaccine likely to be used, under way since last year, have yet to produce data.
    -snip-

    The strain of avian flu known as H5N1 has been circulating among birds in the U.S. since late 2021, and is known only to have infected two people in the country, including a Texas dairy worker last month. U.S. officials aren’t near pulling the trigger on plans to roll out emergency vaccinations.
    -snip-

    Federal officials now say that in the event of an H5N1 pandemic, they would be able to supply a few hundred thousand doses within weeks, followed by 10 million doses using materials already on hand, and then another 125 million within about four months. People would need two doses of the shot to be fully protected.

    A spokesperson for Administration for Strategic Preparedness & Response, the HHS division responsible for pandemic preparations, said that if needed, the agency would work with manufacturers to “to ramp up production to make enough vaccine doses to vaccinate the entire U.S. population.” But the agency didn’t articulate plans beyond those first 135 million doses, which would be enough to inoculate roughly 68 million people in a country of more than 330 million...

    ...https://www.barrons.com/articles/bir...upply-f1f8c6e7




    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    replied
    H5N1 influenza: From avian to bovine to feline and beyond

    By Emily Singler, VMD - 4/19/2024

    In March 2024, dairy and poultry veterinarian Kay Russo, DVM, MAHM, DACPV, was contacted by a fellow veterinarian who was working up cattle on a dairy farm in Texas.

    The cattle were displaying respiratory and gastrointestinal signs including high fevers, respiratory distress, decreased rumination, and significantly decreased milk production. They had high morbidity rates and low mortality rates—and they were testing negative for all the usual suspects.

    Since the farm’s veterinarian had already ruled out bovine syncytial virus, coronavirus, salmonella, and bovine viral diarrhea, Russo knew to be on the lookout for something atypical. She reports that it was the combination of signs, including the mammary involvement, that really made her consider influenza.

    That’s when she posed a question that would have an ominous answer. “What are the birds doing on the farms?” she asked, referring to wild birds such as pigeons and grackles.

    Then answer came back, “the birds are all dead.”

    And those who hadn’t died yet were showing severe neurologic signs.

    Russo quickly advised those who were in the field to obtain as many samples as possible from the birds to send out for testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories.

    When those samples came back positive for H5N1 (one of the two strains associated with highly pathogenic avian influenza or HPAI), Russo felt a pit in her stomach. She knew the cattle needed to be tested as well.

    On March 21, 2024, the first sample from the dairy cattle came back positive for H5N1.
    ...
    Shortly after Russo received the H5N1 diagnosis in the farm’s cattle, barn cats on both affected dairy farms started showing respiratory and neurologic signs.
    ...
    Unfortunately, all five of these cats died. Samples from the cats were sent for testing and came back positive for H5N1.
    ...


    --------------------------------------------------------------

    UN, WHO address public health concern over avian flu transmission to humans

    April 18, 2024
    Kristen Coppock, MA, Associate Editorial Director
    ...
    Globally, there were 887 cases of human H5N1 infection—from January 1, 2003, to February 26, 2024—of which 52% were fatal, according to WHO.5 The H5N1 case in Texas is the United States’ first reported human infection of 2024. It is also the second human case to ever be confirmed in the US, with the previous infection occurring in 2022, in Colorado.4

    According to Kay Russo, DVM, MAHM, DACPV, an industry veterinarian, who has worked as a private dairy practitioner, WHO’s documented mortality rate may be higher than the actual mortality rate in humans because of a bias related to the severity of illness in those who sought care. However, she noted, we still need to have a healthy respect for what this virus is capable of. “The human cases in this current dairy situation are underrepresented due to a lack of testing,” Russo said in an interview with dvm360®.
    ...
    Russo emphasized that early detection and intervention in the form of antivirals are critical to avoid any severe health outcomes from this virus. “Should this virus develop the ability to spread from human to human, [other] individuals living in the household of the infected individual may be at risk. Testing and proper follow-up are strongly encouraged by the CDC. All testing is anonymous,” Russo said.
    ...


    Veterinary professionals working with certain animals are advised to take precautionary steps to minimize risk of infection, while researchers in Texas study potential H5N1 vaccines, antivirals, and antibody therapies for humans

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    replied

    FluTrackers does not sell ad space and we do not make any $ from clicks on this site.

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    replied

    FluTrackers, April 3, 2024 link

    Originally posted by sharon sanders View Post
    "At this time, APHIS is not requiring testing. Testing may be done on a voluntary basis and is a tool producers may use to help manage this disease or reduce the risk of introducing the disease." link

    This policy is ridiculous. There should be massive widespread testing to, at the very least, quantify the size of the problem.

    Irresponsible and against standard outbreak surveillance protocol.
    Main street media taking up the issue. Please see from our news thread on this topic: link


    Stat News, April 18, 2024 - USDA faulted for disclosing scant information about outbreaks of H5N1 avian flu in cattle (hat tip Shiloh)

    New York Times, April 19, 2024 -
    Scientists Fault Federal Response to Bird Flu Outbreaks on Dairy Farms (hat tip Treyfish)

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    replied
    USDA confirms cow-to-cow transmission a factor in bird flu spread

    Fargo, ND, USA / The Mighty 790 KFGO | KFGO
    Thomson Reuters
    Apr 19, 2024 | 2:09 PM

    By Tom Polansek

    CHICAGO (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week that cow-to-cow transmission is a factor in the spread of bird flu in dairy herds, but it still does not know exactly how the virus is being moved around.
    ...
    “Those of us that have worked with influenza for a long time were fairly quickly saying, ‘Yep it moves cow to cow,'” Jim Lowe, an associate dean at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, said on Friday. “You can’t explain the epidemiology any other way.”

    Wild migratory birds are believed to be the original source of the virus. But the USDA said its investigation into cow infections “includes some cases where the virus spread was associated with cattle movements between herds.” There is also evidence the virus spread from dairy cattle premises “back into nearby poultry premises through an unknown route,” the department said.

    The USDA said cows shed the virus in milk at high concentrations, so anything that comes in contact with unpasteurized milk may spread the disease. Respiratory transmission is not considered a primary way for the virus to spread in cattle, the department added.
    ...
    By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week that cow-to-cow transmission is a factor in the spread of bird flu in dairy herds, but it still does not know exactly how the virus is being moved around. Farmers...

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    At above link - 32 entries with the last 3 being:

    State Species Date confirmed by NVSL
    Michigan Dairy Milking Cattle 4/17/2024
    Texas Dairy Milking Cattle 4/17/2024
    Kansas Dairy Milking Cattle 4/17/2024

  • Commonground
    replied
    Helen Branswell

    @HelenBranswell

    1h
    3 more dairy herds have been confirmed to have cows infected with #H5N1 #birdflu. Texas, Kansas & Michigan each notched up one more infected herd. National total is now 32. Seems to be a 2-3 day lag between lab confirmation & posting by
    @USDA
    . https://aphis.usda.gov/livestock-poultry-disease/avian/avian-influenza/hpai-detections/livestock…

    Image

    Last edited by sharon sanders; April 19, 2024, 03:35 PM. Reason: format

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    replied
    Hattip to Shiloh for posting this article:
    GO TO POST

    Excerpt:

    ​...
    Farmers have been told to discard milk from infected cows, though the USDA, the Food and Drug Administration, and the CDC all routinely state that they believe pasteurization would kill the viruses. But that is based on work done on other pathogens, not H5N1.

    STAT has been pressing the USDA about whether research is being done to test the effect of pasteurization on H5N1-contaminated milk. USDA officials deferred questions to the FDA, saying it is responsible for food safety. The FDA said the work had not yet been done. When asked whether the research was underway, and when results would be available, the FDA did not reply.

    “I am shocked we still don’t have the data on pasteurization,” Bright said. “The public deserves to know what experiments are being done [and] when can we expect data from those.”
    ...

    With 28 herds in eight states infected with H5N1 bird flu, scientists are calling on the U.S. to release more data to help them assess the risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    replied
    Animals susceptible to H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI)
    ...
    Insects

    Among non-vertebrate species, research has shown that house flies (Musca domestica) and blow flies (Calliphora nigribarbis) could act as mechanical transmitters of H5N1 HPAI and other avian influenza viruses (AIV). The possible role of other insects such as darkling beetles in the transmission of AIV is under investigation.
    ...

    Leave a comment:

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