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Discussion thread: H5N1 avian flu in US Dairy Cows - March 24+ - 10 human cases

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  • Treyfish
    replied
    No plans yet to modify Colorado livestock fairs, shows despite presence of bird flu in dairy cows

    Risk to the general public remains low; commercial food supply is safe, CDPHE says
    Posted: 7:17 PM, May 08, 2024

    Updated: 39 minutes ago By: Óscar Contreras

    ….During the town hall, Herlihy revealed that state health officials were monitoring 70 dairy farm workers who may have been exposed to H5N1, though no detailed information about those cases was immediately released.

    “To date, none of them have reported symptoms of avian flu, so they have not met criteria to be tested for avian flu per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” a CDPHE spokesperson said in an email late Wednesday afternoon.

    Testing would be available for anyone exposed to bird flu, and antivirals would be provided to those experiencing symptoms while awaiting test results, the CDPHE spokesperson added…..

    Plans to modify livestock fairs and shows in Colorado this summer have not been drafted despite many unknowns about how bird flu is spreading among dairy cattle, state officials said Wednesday.

    Leave a comment:


  • alert
    commented on 's reply
    COVID did not have a 2.5% death rate. H5N1 human infections have had perhaps 100x the mortality rate of COVID, as far as known confirmed cases to this point.

  • Pathfinder
    replied
    FDA chief says feds are preparing for low probability of bird flu moving to humans

    BY: JENNIFER SHUTT - MAY 8, 2024 2:31 PM

    WASHINGTON — The commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said at a congressional hearing Wednesday the agency is preparing for the possibility the strain of avian influenza affecting dairy cattle could jump to humans, though he cautioned the probability is low.

    Robert Califf told senators on the panel in charge of his agency’s funding that top officials from the FDA, Agriculture Department and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are speaking daily to keep a handle on the situation. He also stressed that pasteurized milk is safe.

    “This virus, like all viruses, is mutating,” Califf said. “We need to continue to prepare for the possibility that it might jump to humans.”

    Califf told senators that the “real worry is that it will jump to the human lungs where, when that has happened in other parts of the world for brief outbreaks, the mortality rate has been 25%.”

    That would be about 10 times worse than the death rate from COVID-19, he said.

    Califf stressed the possibility is low and the CDC continues to maintain its assessment that “the current public health risk is low.”

    ...
    https://iowacapitaldispatch.com/2024...ity%20is%20low.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    commented on 's reply
    WHO Director-General's opening remarks at the media briefing – 8 May 2024

    8 May 2024
    ...
    Now to the United States, and the outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza among dairy cattle.

    So far, 36 dairy herds have been infected in nine states. Only one human case has been reported, at least 220 people are being monitored and at least 30 have been tested.

    However, many more people have been exposed to infected animals, and it is important that all those exposed are tested or monitored, and receive care if needed.

    So far, the virus does not show signs of having adapted to spread among humans, but more surveillance is needed.

    The virus has been detected in raw milk in the US, but preliminary tests show that pasteurization kills the virus.

    WHO’s standing advice in all countries is that people should consume pasteurized milk.

    Based on the available information, WHO continues to assess the public health risk posed by H5N1 avian influenza to be low, and low-to-moderate for people exposed to infected animals.

    In recent years, H5N1 has spread widely among wild birds, poultry, land and marine mammals, and now among dairy cattle.

    Since 2021, there have been 28 reported cases in humans, although no human-to-human transmission has been documented in that time.

    WHO has a strong system for monitoring influenza around the world, through a network of influenza centres in 130 countries, 7 Collaborating Centres and 12 reference laboratories with the capacities and biosafety requirements to deal with H5 viruses.

    We also have the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework, to support the rapid development and equitable distribution of vaccines in case of an influenza pandemic.

    However, no similar system exists for other pathogens – a gap that WHO Member States are now seeking to close through the Pandemic Agreement.

    The outbreak of H5N1 in dairy cattle also demonstrates the importance of a One Health approach that recognizes the intimate links between the health of humans, animals and our environment.

    These two systems – one to prevent outbreaks and pandemics through a One Health approach, and another to respond to them by sharing vaccines – are two vital elements of the Pandemic Agreement that WHO Member States are negotiating as we speak.

    I am encouraged that all 194 Member States are strongly committed to finalizing the agreement in time for the World Health Assembly. They are working long hours to find common ground, in good faith, for the people of the world.

    ===

  • Pathfinder
    replied
    Originally posted by Commonground View Post
    I listened to the media briefing, and Dr Tedros states "at least" 220 people are being monitored
    Please see:

    How CDC is monitoring influenza data to better understand the current avian influenza A (H5N1) situation in people (Updated May 3, 2024)

    ​Excerpt:

    Monitoring of Persons Exposed to Infected Animals*

    February 2022 - Present

    CDC and state and local health departments monitor people exposed to infected birds, poultry or other animals for 10 days after exposure. Between February 2022 and now, there have been
    • At least 9,000 people monitored and
    • At least 200 people tested for novel influenza A

    Current HPAI in Cattle Outbreak (2024)

    CDC and state and local health departments monitor people exposed to infected cattle for 10 days after exposure. Between March 2024 and now, there have been
    *CDC numbers are based on state reports and CDC defers to states for updated information on people being monitored and tested.


    How CDC is monitoring influenza data to better understand the current avian influenza A (H5N1) situation in people Español (https://espanol.cdc.gov/enes/flu/avianflu/h5-monitoring.html) | Other Languages (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/pubs/other-languages/) Updated May 3, 2024 Weekly Snapshot for Week Ending April 27, 2024 CDC

    Leave a comment:


  • Commonground
    replied
    I listened to the media briefing, and Dr Tedros states "at least" 220 people are being monitored

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    replied



    Kai Kupferschmidt

    @kakape
    In his media briefing just now,
    @WHO
    director general
    @DrTedros
    called out the US response to #H5N1: 220 people are being monitored and at least 30 have been tested, he noted. "However, many more people have been exposed to infected animals and it's important that all those exposed are tested or monitored and receive care if needed.."​

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I have lambasted China for years for their lack of disclosure. Now the US - in effect - is doing the same thing. Shameful.

    Get out the federal checkbook and start trading cash for cooperation and information. We do that all over the world. Years ago we helped Egypt financially with their H5N1 problem through Namru and USAID + actual cash. Where is the $ for US states and farmers?

    What are our priorities? We hand out US taxpayer money all over the world - H5N1 is having a world effect. Hand out $ domestically too.

    omg....this is not brain surgery....this is pandemic response 101.

    Leave a comment:


  • longshots
    commented on 's reply
    "Everything usually boils down to money."

    something I told my kids when they were growing up...

  • sharon sanders
    replied
    hat tip @Alexander_Tin


    Alexander Tin's notes


    snip

    EPI-WIN webinar by WHO regarding H5N1 detected in dairy cattle
    • Source: webinar
    • Attribution: broadcasted by the World Health Organization
    • Date: occurred May 6, 2024

    snip


    Todd Davis, CDC [00:47:06]

    So there obviously is a lot of interest in understanding the potential for seroprevalence studies.

    Currently, the influenza division is working with state and local public health departments to initiate serology studies in farm workers. So we hope to have more information on this very soon. So those studies are being initiated shortly.


    Notes gathered by Alexander Tin while reporting for CBS News about federal public health agencies.


    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    I guess I am a little rusty after 18 years. lol Thank you for clearing that up.

  • sharon sanders
    replied
    I can't even express my feelings about the lack of testing/visibilty. What comes to mind is China.

    The feds need to get out their checkbook. It is probably the only thing that will make a difference. Farmer $ relief for H5N1 losses in exchange for access and cooperation. State reimbursement for various H5N1 costs in exchange for assistance with access and information.

    Everything usually boils down to money.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treyfish
    replied
    To combat cow flu outbreak, scientists plan to infect cattle with influenza in high-security labs

    Novel effort comes as study finds key receptor for avian flu virus in uddersThe avian influenza virus that has been infecting dairy cows and spreading alarm in the United States was expected to reach Germany this week. But that’s actually good news. A shipment of samples of the H5N1 virus from Cornell University virologist Diego Diel is destined for the Federal Research Institute for Animal Health in Riems, which has one of the rare high-security labs worldwide that are equipped to handle such dangerous pathogens in cattle and other large animals. There veterinarian Martin Beer will use the samples to infect dairy cows, in search of a fuller picture of the threat the virus poses, to both cattle and people, than researchers have been able to glean from spotty data collected in the field.

    Six weeks into the outbreak that has spread to farms in nine U.S. states, the flow of data from those locations remains limited as public health officials sort out authorities and some farms resist oversight. “It’s incredibly difficult to get the right sample sets off the infected farms,” says Richard Webby, an avian influenza researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. “It’s clearly a barrier to understanding what’s going on. … That’s why these experimental infections of cows are really going to be super informative.”
    ​....

    ​​​​​​The results are potentially important but also preliminary, Beer cautions, noting that distinguishing between some types of sialic acids can be difficult. But Webby, one of the preprint’s authors, says it’s obvious the udders are especially hospitable to the virus. “We clearly know the receptors are in there for the avian virus because it's growing like a weed.” The authors also expressed concern that cows, like pigs, could become influenza “mixing vessels” that create dangerous new human strains when avian and mammalian flu viruses that simultaneously infect an animal exchange genes. Beer says he’s more worried, however, about an avian virus slowly adapting.....

    .....​​​​​​But the rapid viral growth in cow udders raises concerns that the avian virus could learn to latch on to the mammal-specific virus receptor also in the udder, says Tom Peacock, an influenza virologist at the Pirbright Institute. “It seems a good reason to get this eradicated from cattle as soon as possible.”.....

    “The big question right now is whether the virus is mechanically transmitted or can be transmitted from cow to cow via aerosol as well,” says Jürgen Richt, a virologist at Kansas State University.....

    ...Richt, who runs one such facility, plans to inoculate the nose and mouth of male and female cows with the same strain Diel sent Beer. “Then we will look at what’s happening within the animals,” he says. “We will kill some of them after 4 or 5 days and look where the virus is in the body.” Others will be watched for weeks to see whether they develop antibodies to H5N1 and how long they shed the virus in various ways.,,,,,

    plenty more...

    Leave a comment:


  • Treyfish
    replied
    FIRST OPINION
    As livestock move around the country, so does H5N1. The U.S. needs real-time tracking of livestock movements
    May 7, 2024

    By Shweta Bansal and Colleen Webb

    ​​​​​​The presence of H5N1 avian influenza virus, better known as bird flu, among dairy cows in Texas — the second largest producer of dairy cattle — was first confirmed in late March. By then, H5N1 had likely been circulating among dairy cows for months. Six weeks later, the nine states responsible for more than one-quarter of U.S. dairy production, which accounts for 3.5% of the U.S.’s gross domestic product, had each reported H5N1 cases in dairy cows and continue to do so.

    Many questions remain open about the transmission of H5N1 among dairy cows and about the possibility of the virus adapting to transmit among humans. Even with the best possible outcomes, this outbreak reveals the precipice on which the U.S. rests with respect to livestock diseases.

    ​​​​​​In the event of an infectious disease outbreak in livestock, even one that does not directly threaten human health, the costs can be catastrophic. The production of animal products (milk, other dairy products, eggs, and meat) can decrease drastically. Other costs can come from the control efforts or trade bans and loss of consumer demand. Twenty years ago, a single case of “mad cow disease” caused U.S. beef exports to plummet by more than $2.5 billion, and domestic prices fell by 16%.

    News of the spread of avian influenza among U.S. dairy cows in late April led cattle futures to fall sharply at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (the largest U.S. exchange for cattle futures). And Colombia, which buys $43 million in beef annually from the U.S., has restricted beef imports, even though no evidence has yet been found of the virus in beef cattle.
    ​....

    ​​​​​​National-scale movement of farm animals as they transition through the production cycle is a key component of this highly specialized industry and is unlikely to change. In the U.S., beef cattle might be born in one place, raised and fattened in another, then killed and butchered in another. The U.S. livestock industry is geographically dispersed and intensely connected: 60% of cattle born in a year cross state borders​...

    ​​​​​​Livestock markets act much as airports do for humans: they bring together animals (sometimes of multiple species) coming from many different farms, creating opportunities for contact between infected and susceptible animals before being sold and dispersed to other far-flung farms. Feedlots, facilities at which animals are fattened before slaughter or before being returned to the same or different dairy farms for stronger milk production, can also act as hubs for propagating infection.

    In response to the evolving H5N1 outbreak, the USDA has placed additional influenza-testing requirements on interstate movements of dairy cows. However, the limited information available about livestock movement indicates that the movements of most cattle (dairy or beef) from or to markets occur within states. While the USDA strategy is essential in limiting the geographical diffusion of H5N1, the disease could be moving long distances within states without detection.....
    lots more...


    Managing diseases in livestock in a country the size of the U.S. is a huge challenge due to the frequent and extensive movement of animals across the nation. That means local animal disease problems quickly become national.

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    commented on 's reply
    Please see:

    CDC - Updated Interim Recommendations for Worker Protection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Reduce Exposure to Novel Influenza A Viruses Associated with Disease in Humans - April 26, 2024

  • sharon sanders
    replied

    FluTrackers.com
    @FluTrackers
    ·
    25s
    US - In a call to states' public health officials & partner orgs the "CDC asked
    that jurisdictions make PPE available to workers on dairy farms, poultry
    farms, and in slaughterhouses."
    https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/united-states/h5n1-tracking-af/987593-us-dairy-cows-test-positive-for-h5n1-avian-flu-in-texas-kansas-idaho-michigan-new-mexico-ohio-north-carolina-south-dakota-colorado-march-24-one-known-human-case-texas-april-1?p=990114#post990114… #H5N1

    Leave a comment:

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