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Discussion thread III - Covid-19 (new coronavirus)

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  • I agree that Korea has the best numbers because they are doing community surveillance and are catching asymptomatic and symptomatic cases. Korea has reported 32 deaths from 5,300 cases. That's 0.6%, (not .2 or .4) and does not take into account that some who are currently sick will die.
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

    Comment


    • Emily
      Emily commented
      Editing a comment
      Maybe what it boils down to is that the virus hasn't changed a lot in the past few weeks, and neither has human nature. Life Care was a salad spinner for the virus and I doubt it is the only one.

  • I've wondered about obesity and SAR-CoV-2. Fauci is the only one I have heard mention that as a risk factor, more along the lines of the problems seen in young obese patients with the pH1N1 - a mechanical problem, though there could have been something metabolic, too. Now Chinese scientists are thinking that the ACE2 expression in fat tissue could be a factor. We have a lot of obesity in the US relative to China, even here in the outdoorsy Pacific Northwest.
    Never forget Excalibur.
    “‘i love myself.’ the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever.” ---- nayyirah waheed
    Avatar: Franz Marc, Liegender Hund im Schnee 1911 (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)

    Comment


    • South Korea-Daegu-Gyeongbuk daily new cases (135),34,32,56,57,93,36,64,19,22

      they did realise, how important it is to stop it early. They declared war on COVID Mar02, all agencies 24/7.
      Remember how they managed the MERS outbreak in 2015

      Why can't we do that in Europe,USA ? Won't it be cheaper in the end economically as well ? Even if we ignore
      all the diseases and deaths. WHO recommends it. Not only for us, but also to reduce the worldwide spread,
      to give an example to the rest of the world. Until vaccine or drugs are available
      That we are as "good" as communist China ;-)
      I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
      my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

      Comment


      • It is a special type of "challenging", when we watch the train crash in slow motion, as we are right now :/

        We can see what needs to be done, we know what the next steps have to be, and yet, those in charge, continuously ignore them. Meanwhile, the world's most simplistic semi-living organism, a simple virus, marches forwards, unabated.

        Comment


        • JJackson
          JJackson commented
          Editing a comment
          It is the public health catch 22. Spend a fortune to be ready for a zoonotic epidemic (or on containment) and turn it into a non-event, you will get shot for wasting money on something that never happened anyway. Don't and get crucified for not preparing.
          Last edited by JJackson; March 5, 2020, 11:05 AM.

        • Emily
          Emily commented
          Editing a comment
          I felt a lot of compassion for WA state/King County officials watching Wednesday's press conference. They are addressing the needs of patients and family at Life Care and juggling all the other issues as best as anyone can. The voluntary social distancing is a good plan, IMO.
          Just hope that Pence brings some N-95's for the UW doctors.

          ***ETA - Yes, he did bring hundreds of thousands of masks and other PPE to WA state. Very happy to see that!
          Last edited by Emily; March 6, 2020, 04:38 AM.

      • I received this email from a friend:

        From Dr. James Robb, UC San Diego

        ‚€œWhat I am doing for the upcoming COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic‚€Ě

        Dear Colleagues, as some of you may recall, when I was a professor of pathology at the University of California San Diego, I was one of the first molecular virologists in the world to work on coronaviruses (the 1970s). I was the first to demonstrate the number of genes the virus contained. Since then, I have kept up with the coronavirus field and its multiple clinical transfers into the human population (e.g., SARS, MERS), from different animal sources.

        The current projections for its expansion in the US are only probable, due to continued insufficient worldwide data, but it is most likely to be widespread in the US by mid to late March and April.

        Here is what I have done and the precautions that I take and will take. These are the same precautions I currently use during our influenza seasons, except for the mask and gloves.:

        1) NO HANDSHAKING! Use a fist bump, slight bow, elbow bump, etc.
        2) Use ONLY your knuckle to touch light switches. elevator buttons, etc.. Lift the gasoline dispenser with a paper towel or use a disposable glove.
        3) Open doors with your closed fist or hip ‚€“ do not grasp the handle with your hand, unless there is no other way to open the door. Especially important on bathroom and post office/commercial doors.
        4) Use disinfectant wipes at the stores when they are available, including wiping the handle and child seat in grocery carts.
        5) Wash your hands with soap for 10-20 seconds and/or use a greater than 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer whenever you return home from ANY activity that involves locations where other people have been.
        6) Keep a bottle of sanitizer available at each of your home‚€™s entrances. AND in your car for use after getting gas or touching other contaminated objects when you can‚€™t immediately wash your hands.
        7) If possible, cough or sneeze into a disposable tissue and discard. Use your elbow only if you have to. The clothing on your elbow will contain infectious virus that can be passed on for up to a week or more!

        What I have stocked in preparation for the pandemic spread to the US:1) Latex or nitrile latex disposable gloves for use when going shopping, using the gasoline pump, and all other outside activity when you come in contact with contaminated areas.

        Note: This virus is spread in large droplets by coughing and sneezing. This means that the air will not infect you! BUT all the surfaces where these droplets land are infectious for about a week on average ‚€“ everything that is associated with infected people will be contaminated and potentially infectious. The virus is on surfaces and you will not be infected unless your unprotected face is directly coughed or sneezed upon.
        This virus only has cell receptors for lung cells (it only infects your lungs) The only way for the virus to infect you is through your nose or mouth via your hands or an infected cough or sneeze onto or into your nose or mouth.
        2) Stock up now with disposable surgical masks and use them to prevent you from touching your nose and/or mouth (We touch our nose/mouth 90X/day without knowing it!). This is the only way this virus can infect you ‚€“ it is lung-specific. The mask will not prevent the virus in a direct sneeze from getting into your nose or mouth ‚€“ it is only to keep you from touching your nose or mouth.
        3) Stock up now with hand sanitizers and latex/nitrile gloves (get the appropriate sizes for your family). The hand sanitizers must be alcohol-based and greater than 60% alcohol to be effective.
        4) Stock up now with zinc lozenges. These lozenges have been proven to be effective in blocking coronavirus (and most other viruses) from multiplying in your throat and nasopharynx. Use as directed several times each day when you begin to feel ANY ‚€œcold-like‚€Ě symptoms beginning. It is best to lie down and let the lozenge dissolve in the back of your throat and nasopharynx. Cold-Eeze lozenges is one brand available, but there are other brands available.

        I, as many others do, hope that this pandemic will be reasonably contained, BUT I personally do not think it will be. Humans have never seen this snake-associated virus before and have no internal defense against it. Tremendous worldwide efforts are being made to understand the molecular and clinical virology of this virus. Unbelievable molecular knowledge about the genomics, structure, and virulence of this virus has already been achieved. BUT, there will be NO drugs or vaccines available this year to protect us or limit the infection within us. Only symptomatic support is available.

        I hope these personal thoughts will be helpful during this potentially catastrophic pandemic. You are welcome to share this email. Good luck to all of us!

        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • China autopsies - irreversible lung damage

          does other research support this finding?

          https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/he...c54e2d2b9305ca

          Comment


          • Commonground
            Commonground
            Senior Moderator
            • Join Date: May 2006
            • Posts: 9476

            #10
            March 2nd, 2020, 08:47 AM
            Originally posted by kiwibird View Post
            https://twitter.com/i/status/1234387570320080896 Stated as an Iranian soldier. Not likely to be elderly or have co-morbidities then!
            excerpt from Lancet published February 22, 2020


            All three coronaviruses induce excessive and aberrant non-effective host immune responses that are associated with severe lung pathology, leading to death.

            Similar to patients with SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, some patients with 2019-nCoV develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with characteristic pulmonary ground glass changes on imaging. In most moribund patients, 2019-nCoV infection is also associated with a cytokine storm, which is characterised by increased plasma concentrations of interleukins 2, 7, and 10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, interferon-γ-inducible protein 10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, and tumour necrosis factor α.

            In those who survive intensive care, these aberrant and excessive immune responses lead to long-term lung damage and fibrosis, causing functional disability and reduced quality of life.

            All three coronaviruses induce excessive and aberrant non-effective host immune responses that are associated with severe lung pathology, leading to death.

            https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...305-6/fulltext

            and
            NawtyBits
            NawtyBits
            Registered User
            • Join Date: May 2006
            • Posts: 62

            #125
            February 1st, 2020, 03:43 PM
            Originally posted by hawkeye View Post
            Thanks LA - reading what you've written, do we know if reinfection is not possible (I'm sure there are always exceptions, but I'm asking with regards to the general population)? I hadn't thought about it until now.
            https://translate.googleusercontent....oEAnmDpR8cUHSQ

            Expert: Wuhan pneumonia is still at risk of reinfection or pulmonary fibrosis sequelae after healing

            Experts point out that patients who have recovered from the new type of coronavirus pneumonia still have the risk of reinfection, and they should strengthen their protection.

            The new coronavirus pneumonia epidemic is raging, and many cases have been recovered so far. However, at the press conference of the National Health Commission on Friday (31st), experts pointed out that patients who are cured still have the risk of reinfection, so protection should be strengthened.

            In addition, experts also mentioned that generally mild patients have no sequelae after recovery, and very severe patients may have pulmonary fibrosis for a period of time.

            Zhan Qingyuan, director of the fourth and fifth department of Respiratory Medicine of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, pointed out that the general rule of viral infection, patients will produce certain antibodies after viral infection, which has a protective effect on the human body. But in fact, antibodies may not last long, so patients who have recovered from new coronavirus pneumonia still have the risk of reinfection, and they should strengthen their protection.

            Regarding the question of whether the cured patients will have sequelae, Zhan Qingyuan pointed out that after clinically found that the new type of coronavirus infection, the patients were mainly damaged lungs, but mild patients should have no sequelae, and severe patients may have a residual for a period of time Lung damage repairs changes, such as fibrosis. But Zhan Qingyuan emphasized that the lung's repairing ability is very strong, and most of the fibrosis can be repaired. "But for very heavy, very, very, very few patients, they may leave a little lung for a long time. Fibrosis, we need to strengthen the follow-up. "
            ďThe only security we have is our ability to adapt."

            Comment


            • I have a question. I saw a press briefing where one of the reporters asked about testing and if the uninsured could get tested in the US. The question was not answered. What is the correct situation? Because if this is the case, then the US will be in for a very rough ride with this virus. You cannot contain or mitigate if a large sector of your population is not being tested, and therefore isolated or treated. If, on the other hand this is correct, then does this mean that insurers will be required to foot the bill for care? Because if so, are they financially resilient enough to cope with millions of ventilation / ICU cases or will it make them go bust?

              Comment


              • Niko
                Niko commented
                Editing a comment
                Snipped: "This is still a developing situation. As new U.S. cases emerge, states will likely roll out new policies. Vice President Mike Pence announced Tuesday that Medicare and Medicaid would cover COVID-19 testing.

                In New York state, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has extended emergency measures for insurers there to waive cost-sharing and charge no co-pays to those on Medicaid.

                Perhaps other states won’t need to: On Monday, U.S. Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., announced a bill that would provide Medicaid coverage of COVID-19 testing for all Americans."

                https://www.google.com/amp/s/whyy.or...insurance/amp/

              • Emily
                Emily commented
                Editing a comment
                I believe WA state can and will set their own mandates for insurance coverage of the test. Not sure about coverage for uninsured. Also remember many insured avoid going to the doctor because deductibles are so large. Promised insurance coverage can be merely lipstick on a pig. Even Medicare with no private supplement has a $450 deductible. Yes, this is low compared to the huge insurance deductibles but many on Medicare are poor.
                Last edited by Emily; March 7, 2020, 02:22 AM.

            • Relayed to me:
              Source was in meeting at a small healthcare firm near Boston yesterday. Woman from firm was coughing, sneezing and blowing nose. Source in meeting had to then go to other clients at different firms throughout Boston. Since not enough test kits available, was this just a cold? Could source potentially be a carrier to additional firms in the area? Where is the point that a company steps in and sends person home? Where is the point that source should have stopped working, if feeling no symptoms yet possibly exposed?

              In Boston, another source working in large government office overheard a coworker saying she was feeling unwell and coughing, yet still at work. Source went to boss who immediately removed worker. How does this worker get home? Uber or mass transit, since few personally drive to work? No mask available to give to worker who was sent home.

              Business as usual.

              Comment


              • KCTV5: (Mar5) ...For Missouri, the Jackson County Health Department just got their five kits today.

                The Kansas City Health Department said they’ll be receiving their five very soon...
                https://www.kctv5.com/coronavirus/a-...db08d1eb2.html

                Clarification: Each test kit can test 700-800 specimens.
                Last edited by Missouriwatcher; March 7, 2020, 07:51 AM.

                Comment


                • I don't have a link, but heard on the local radio that some Chinese scientists warned the US that the obese and smokers could be high risk.
                  Never forget Excalibur.
                  “‘i love myself.’ the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever.” ---- nayyirah waheed
                  Avatar: Franz Marc, Liegender Hund im Schnee 1911 (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)

                  Comment


                  • JJackson
                    JJackson commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Anorexia was listed but I did not see obesity. I have not seen any data on smoking but it would be logical to assume anything that reduces lung function efficiency will have a knock on effect.

                • Maricopa County, Arizona

                  “We are no longer recommending quarantine of exposed healthcare workers who don’t show any symptoms because we need our healthcare workforce during this response,” Dr. Sunenshine added.

                  https://www.maricopa.gov/CivicAlerts.aspx?aid=1015

                  Comment


                  • Shiloh
                    Shiloh commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I think they are the first health department to state that, Do you know what the state's response to that is?

                  • Thornton
                    Thornton commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Short term gain, long term pain. In similiar outbreaks health care workers become a major source of spread unless they take extraordinary precautions. If they wait to show symptoms they merely confirm the spread is occurring.

                • Clemson University asking students studying abroad to return to U.S.

                  https://www.foxcarolina.com/news/cle...53784f710.html

                  Comment


                  • Hi Everyone!

                    Hey - just a reminder...no political posts.

                    The cases in the US are getting ready to explode because testing will be more readily available.

                    Coronavirus is now a political football.

                    I guarantee that no city, county, federal department will perform well. We need to assess each situation and offer help where we can in a logical and factual way.

                    It is not productive to make politically motivated posts. Believe me, there will be enough blame to go around for every single politician and office holder.

                    We can not become like the other medias. They are consumed by vicious politics. Even the questions that are asked by various reporters are loaded with political innuendo.

                    We are the only non-political media.

                    We need to stay focused on how to help the most people: pertinent, factual updates and scientific information.

                    News items like "shortage of ICU beds", "quarantined my neighborhood", "lack of facts about the latest cases"....are all ok.

                    I know it will be extremely frustrating. If you find yourself boiling over the top get off the computer and take a walk around the house.

                    Remember - to help the most people - we need this site to stay collegial.

                    People don't come here for the politics. They come here for the truth.

                    Comment


                    • GREAT reminder, Sharon!!

                      Comment

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