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  • Toilet Paper Substitute?

    Toilet paper takes up a lot of space when stockpiling. Our household uses alot of the stuff. I am worried we may not be able to stockpile enough. Any ideas for substitutes?

  • #2
    Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

    Babywipes take up less room, you need less and some are antibacterial.

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    • #3
      Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

      I was just reading in the magazine "Natural Life" that one family uses soap and water which they find cleans their bodies better. Their goal is to save trees, primarily. I assume cost is also a benefit. You could buy the thin and small baby washcloths which would be great for that purpose (or use nice cotton rags, old towels cut up or washcloths). Those washable cloths would take up less room than regular toilet paper.

      Having wiped my toilet training children's butts I can tell you that even when the paper is clean the body isn't always clean. That is a little testimonial for you. The kids use wet wipes now to aid the process. The are not perfect as I found I was allergic to them and really had a problem which I will not get into here...

      When I was a baby my parents used a wet washcloth with a little soap on it as baby wipes were not invented yet.

      Sometimes we don't have to look to far back in time to think of simpler ways of doing things.

      Becoming frugal and finding multiple uses for things will be necessary if a pandemic hits.

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      • #4
        Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

        For people who are concerned about nappies/diapers taking up to much space.

        http://www.natural-wisdom.com/
        Last edited by Walter; February 27th, 2006, 04:04 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

          Thank you for the suggestions. I think for us the baby wipes will do. I guess they will not be out enforcing the no backyard burning rule, so that should work well.

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          • #6
            Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

            And what do you do when the wipes and toilet paper run out? Stock up on JC Penny catalogues, they're compact and will go a long ways. Also, take a roll of paper towels and remove the cardboard roll. In a large dish pan, soak the paper towels in a solution of water and antibacterial hand soap. After thoroughly soaked, place paper towels and about 2 cups of water/soap solution into a 2 gallon size ziplock bag. Press all the air out and store. Takes up less room and you have wet wipes that are large and will go a long ways.

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            • #7
              Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

              I was at the house of a Saudi, and surprised to find there was no TP in the bathroom. There was, however, a picture of water positioned near the toilet.

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              • #8
                Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                A twin-nozzled electronic bidet unit built into a toilet seat





                There are three types of toilets commonly found in Japan. The oldest type is a simple squat toilet, which is still common in public restrooms. After World War II, modern Western-type flush toilets and urinals became common. The current state of the art is bidet toilets, which, as of 2004, are installed in more than half of Japanese households. In Japan, these bidets are commonly called Washlets (ウォシュレット), a brand name of Kitakyushu-based TOTO Ltd., and include many advanced features rarely seen outside of Japan.
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_toilet
                Many Japanese women are embarrassed at the thought that someone else can hear them while they are doing their business on the toilet (a condition known as paruresis). To cover the sound of bodily functions, many women flushed public toilets continuously while using them, wasting a large amount of water in the process. As education campaigns did not stop this practice, a device was introduced in the 1980s that, after activation, produces the sound of flushing water without the need for actual flushing.

                Wooden toilet paper from the Nara period (710 to 784) in Japan. The modern rolls in the background are for size comparison

                Records of human usage of toilet paper first appeared in China, during the 14th century.
                The first factory-made paper marketed exclusively for toilet use was produced by Joseph Cayetty in the United States in 1857. Cayetty's name was printed on every sheet.
                Before this invention, wealthy people used wool, lace or hemp for their ablutions, while less wealthy people used their hand when defecating into rivers, or cleaned themselves with various materials such as rags, wood shavings, leaves, grass, hay, stone, sand, moss, water, snow, maize husks, or seashells, depending upon the country and weather conditions or social customs. In Ancient Rome, a sponge on a stick was commonly used, and, after usage, placed back in a bucket of saltwater.

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                • #9
                  Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                  Easier to stock up on toilet paper, you only need 100-300 rolls depending on plan and family size and if you by a trunk you could dquease them all flat'ish into it.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                    a small bucket of water with a little bleach... rinse wash rag and back hang on YOUR hook. empty bucket. Next...

                    to find out how much toilet paper you use.. remove all toilet paper on Saturday Morning before anyone gets up. Use, change if necessary, On Monday morning before anyone wakes up remove toilet paper and replace with what you took off. Count how many rolls you went through or estimate how many rolls it would be if you had more then one bathroom. If you used 1 roll in two days then estimate you use 1/2 a roll a day. If you find you used 3 full rolls then estimate you would use 1.5 rolls a day for how ever many people are in your household.

                    You can crush toilet paper as it has a hollow roll. I can get 36 rolls of Costco toilet paper in 1 rubber maid tote.

                    I would only use the bucket and rag if I ran out but... as mentioned.. telephone books, catalogs, newspaper all of these things work just fine... well better then the alternative!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                      No thanks and no prison grade TP for me. I'm stocking up on Charmin. Got to use and rotate your preps!

                      BTW: since water and flushing may be a problem you want a TP that is easy to dissolve.

                      http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodho...0135-1,00.html

                      Rotor-Rooter may no be operating when you need them.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                        A gentle warning to our readers- I'm very uncomfortable with the idea of bleach used for ANYTHING that contacts human tissue, it could cause serious burns and damage if used incorrectly- and thats easy to do.

                        Vinegar is a very gentle on human tissue, but effective mildly acidic germ killer, used by Home Health Nurses to clean and disinfect many types of home medical equipment. If anyone feels the need for a disinfectant thats used on skin, unless youre using one sepcifically formulated for skin; I'd suggest adding vinegar insteadof bleach. Too much chance of someone making too strong a solution, or of a child or pet getting into it and drinking or other wise being injured by it.

                        A mild bleach solution is great for washing rags and equipment that will be well rinsed before they are used.

                        I realize you probably were'nt suggesting bleach be used that way, Brook; please dont be offended by my warning. But after reading the earlier idea about the Roman sponge on the stick, and then the post about bleach, I though that it was possible that some of our readers (especially translating from other languages) might interpret it that same way (that first post kinda puts it into your mind and might lead to the second being interpreted that same) so I just wanted to mention it in case.
                        Upon this gifted age, in its dark hour,
                        Rains from the sky a meteoric shower
                        Of facts....They lie unquestioned, uncombined.
                        Wisdom enough to leech us of our ill
                        Is daily spun, but there exists no loom
                        To weave it into fabric..
                        Edna St. Vincent Millay "Huntsman, What Quarry"
                        All my posts to this forum are for fair use and educational purposes only.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                          Maybe I am not aware of english nuances in this matter and it is already stated, but when my older sun was born, there were no disposable diapers.

                          I had a bucket with a top that open with my feet and dropped the rinse diapers in clean water of the toilet and drop it in there, I have put water and bleach in it, not too much. Then once a day I would wash carefully the diaper, dry it, and used it again.

                          My older never had skin rush problem with it.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                            For home owners/renters:
                            Our preps which require climate control go into the basement. However, TP, paper towels, sanitary products, old towels & sheets are just fine in the attic or garage. Think of it as added insulation
                            "In the beginning of change, the patriot is a scarce man (or woman ), and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for it then costs nothing to be a patriot."- Mark Twain
                            Reason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it. -Thomas Paine

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                            • #15
                              Re: Toilet Paper Substitute?

                              Originally posted by Snowy Owl
                              Maybe I am not aware of english nuances in this matter and it is already stated, but when my older sun was born, there were no disposable diapers.

                              I had a bucket with a top that open with my feet and dropped the rinse diapers in clean water of the toilet and drop it in there, I have put water and bleach in it, not too much. Then once a day I would wash carefully the diaper, dry it, and used it again.

                              My older never had skin rush problem with it.
                              I also used cloth diapers for my 2 children. Disposables were for traveling.

                              I soaked them in water with Borax prior to washing. Washing included an extra rinse.
                              If possible, I dried them in the sunshine - it's a marvelous antimicrobal & they smell good.

                              .
                              "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

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