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  • Eneloop batteries?

    I am finally getting to my pre-storm season prep-up, and am about to buy some AA and AAA sizes of Eneloop rechargeable batteries and a small charger.

    Looks like these have been available since 2007, but the latest generation have better charge retention in storage, plus can do more recharge cycles than previous batteries.

    Our usage of those battery sizes is mainly headlamps, small LED flashlights/lanterns, and a camera. We usually buy jumbo packs of disposable batteries at Costco, but pricing for a starter kit of 10 AA, 4 AAA and a small charger on Amazon is around $42. The charger is the kind that can do 1 to 4 batteries, whereas some require charging in pairs which can lead to faster battery failure if the pairs being charged are at unequal power levels.

    Does anyone have experience with these?

  • #2
    Re: Eneloop batteries?

    I learnt recently, that they are now mainly using "18650" accus
    in China, so I switched to these.
    Mainly for the new "2000 lumen" flashlights (which have maybe only
    500 lumen or such, but still good)


    ----------edit-------
    I didn't know eneloop, didn't see them here in normal shops.
    looked it up: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop
    90% after 1y, 80% after 5y , while 18650s only have ~80% after 1y
    2100 cycles, lasting 5 years ... I'll be dead in 10500 years
    one reloading may take 1min of work+attention, so 35y over 2100 reloadings,
    so the time is worth much more than the battery.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...n_rechargeable
    I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
    my current links: [url]http://bit.ly/hFI7H[/url] ILI-charts: [url]http://bit.ly/CcRgT[/url]

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    • #3
      Re: Eneloop batteries?

      Eneloops are an excellent choice, as they take well to recharging and also keep their charge between uses for many months, unlike most other rechargeables.
      Recharging is a pain once you step off the standard pair-wise approach.
      Lacrosse used to sell a very fancy charger that allows single batteries to dealt with, at a fancy price. A simple Sanyo/Panasonic charger should be all you need. To fill the gap, buy a few extra batteries instead of a tricked out charger.

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      • #4
        Re: Eneloop batteries?

        Thanks for the thumbs up. Payday is tomorrow, and a nice starter kit will be first on my list.

        We're getting into windstorm season here in the PNW which means lots of power outages...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Eneloop batteries?

          Originally posted by BestlaStormcrow View Post
          I am finally getting to my pre-storm season prep-up, and am about to buy some AA and AAA sizes of Eneloop rechargeable batteries and a small charger.

          Looks like these have been available since 2007, but the latest generation have better charge retention in storage, plus can do more recharge cycles than previous batteries.

          Our usage of those battery sizes is mainly headlamps, small LED flashlights/lanterns, and a camera. We usually buy jumbo packs of disposable batteries at Costco, but pricing for a starter kit of 10 AA, 4 AAA and a small charger on Amazon is around $42. The charger is the kind that can do 1 to 4 batteries, whereas some require charging in pairs which can lead to faster battery failure if the pairs being charged are at unequal power levels.

          Does anyone have experience with these?
          I have used several dozen eneloop batteries spread over 2 generations and found them to be excellent. Most of those were purchased from costco. My only complaint is the chargers supplied with the costco packs was cost reduced from a 4 channel to a 2 channel design.

          The new higher capacity cells have increased capacity at the expense of reduced cycle life.

          I wish eneloop made C and D cells, but no luck so far.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Eneloop batteries?

            Yes, the pre-charged type of battery work well and hold their charge much longer than the older style nickel cadmium batteries and there are adaptors that you can convert AA to C and D so we have replaced all of our batteries with these except for the 9 volts and the batteries in anything that goes outside (BBQ lighter, temperature sensor, etc.) as they don't do well in out cold climate. There are many brands and it does pay to shop around.

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            • #7
              Re: Eneloop batteries?

              Our local Costco has an eneloop bundle on sale for $20. It has 8 AA and 2 AAA batteries, plus charger. I don't have the package in front of me to verify details, but the package says 2100x.
              My partner bought 2 packages, and when I get home and see what generation they are and what model charger I will update.

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              • #8
                Re: Eneloop batteries?

                Originally posted by blacknail View Post
                Yes, the pre-charged type of battery work well and hold their charge much longer than the older style nickel cadmium batteries and there are adaptors that you can convert AA to C and D so we have replaced all of our batteries with these except for the 9 volts and the batteries in anything that goes outside (BBQ lighter, temperature sensor, etc.) as they don't do well in out cold climate. There are many brands and it does pay to shop around.
                Keep in mind that the AA cells are only about 2 ah while typical D cells are 10 ah so an AA cell used with the adapters will not last nearly as long as a real C or D cell.

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                • #9
                  Re: Eneloop batteries?

                  Originally posted by Zac View Post
                  Keep in mind that the AA cells are only about 2 ah while typical D cells are 10 ah so an AA cell used with the adapters will not last nearly as long as a real C or D cell.
                  Absolutely! Some expensive alkaline D batteries have 20 ah and they also perform better in the cold. We use ours in baby swings, cat feeders, toys and radios and haven't noticed a huge difference from the economy packs of C and D batteries but there is a difference for sure. Everything that is critical in our house seems to run on 9V which we still buy top of the line alkaline for and we haven't bought a AAA, AA, C, or D battery in years so we have no idea how much longer they last any more.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Eneloop batteries?

                    Originally posted by blacknail View Post
                    Absolutely! Some expensive alkaline D batteries have 20 ah and they also perform better in the cold. We use ours in baby swings, cat feeders, toys and radios and haven't noticed a huge difference from the economy packs of C and D batteries but there is a difference for sure. Everything that is critical in our house seems to run on 9V which we still buy top of the line alkaline for and we haven't bought a AAA, AA, C, or D battery in years so we have no idea how much longer they last any more.
                    We keep a range of bulk pack batteries in stock, but seem to use AAA the most. I'm, really looking forward to trying the eneloops in our LED flashlights and headlamps this storm season.

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