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Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens

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  • Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens

    Source: http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Features.../18858716.html


    What to do when it hits the fan
    Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens
    By KRIS SIMS, QMI Agency


    OTTAWA - This harvest season, backyard gardens are taking on greater importance: Survival and security.

    "Our supermarkets don't actually store anything anymore. They are all stored in refrigerated trucks out on our highways," said David Chernushenko, an Ottawa city councillor and advocate for local food. "Our entire continent's food supply is heavily dependent on these trucks constantly moving on their way to us."

    In the midst of the recession, so-called victory gardens are booming throughout the U.S...

  • #2
    Re: Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens

    Victory Garden, from Wikipedia . . . .

    Victory gardens, also called war gardens or food gardens for defense, were vegetable, fruit and herb gardens planted at private residences and public parks in United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Germany<sup id="cite_ref-0" class="reference">[1]</sup> during World War I and World War II to reduce the pressure on the public food supply brought on by the war effort. In addition to indirectly aiding the war effort these gardens were also considered a civil "morale booster" ? in that gardeners could feel empowered by their contribution of labor and rewarded by the produce grown. This made victory gardens become a part of daily life on the home front.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victory_garden

    Home grown vegetable gardens can always provide a buffer in case of a local or national disaster. There are numerous posts about gardening and subsistence farming in this FluTrackers Forum: Long Term Preps (incl. gardening)
    http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

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    • #3
      Re: Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens

      When we were living up in Massachusetts we rented a victory garden plot in a public park. Back then the cost may have been about $20 for the growing season. Each plot was about 20 feet by 10 with pathways in between for easy access. The park provided water from a faucet and there were usually two hoses attached to it to transport the water to where it was needed. There was also an area for parking. 20 x 10 may not sound like much but it was more than big enough to supply us with tomatoes, peppers, other fresh produce and some fresh air and exercise. I don't remember any problems with disappearing produce. The park closed at sun set and was patrolled by the police. I don't know if our plot was one of the two park victory gardens left over from WWII that Al's post mentioned.

      While there may only be two parks in the US with Victory gardens left over from WWII they are not the only parks to provide garden plots to the public. Parks and municipalities providing land for public use gardens has a quite history in the US. If there is enough public desire for it and the political pressure to proceed it is amazing what can be accomplished. It takes some time and effort to convince officials there is a need, get approval and then survey and mark appropriate sized plots and paths and then allocate the plots. Water for gardens is a must especially irrigation in drought years. It does not have to be anything elaborate. As mentioned before, a faucet providing potable water and hose will do.

      Below is another example in Arlington, VA. Not surprising there is a waiting list for plots.


      http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/gsgp/plots.htm
      We were put on this earth to help and take care of one another.

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      • #4
        Re: Recession sparks revival of wartime victory gardens

        If you don't care or are not up to growing produce yourself, you can buy shares in local farms in many places.

        http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

        You take some risk along with the farmer by investing in the operation prior to the growing season. We get a small share with a local CSA. We don't get all of our food there, but we like to know that whatever happens to the global supply chain, we have price and availability of fresh produce locked in. (And the produce is fresh and tasty!)
        _____________________________________________

        Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

        i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed

        (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
        Never forget Excalibur.

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        • #5
          If there is no land for a victory garden?

          This is another options for those who can't find land for a garden.

          For a while we lived on rented property and could not have a garden. We belonged to a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) for years and loved it. I had an agreement with the farmer. I worked on the farm a few hours each week and we received our farm share of veggies and fruits for free! It also gave me first dibs on the blemished (seconds) fruits and veggies produced at the farm. These were welcome additions to the pantry as I love to put by pickles, jellies, jams and preserves.

          Each year for members our CSA also did a spring Ice Cream social and a bonfire pot luck dinner in the fall. The bonfire took care of much of the farms yearly accumulated brush and wood waste and we went home full tummies and warm memories.

          http://www.localharvest.org/csa/
          We were put on this earth to help and take care of one another.

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          • #6
            Still pertinent today. The links are broken in posts #1 & #3.

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            • #7
              bump this

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              • #8
                https://rwmalonemd.substack.com/p/th...um=reader2&s=r
                The Victory Garden.
                Don’t just Consume, Produce. Our parents did it, and so can we.



                Robert W Malone MD, MS

                May 24
                “If people let government decide which food they eat and medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny”

                Thomas Jefferson

                A backyard garden can quite literally feed a whole family. People don’t have to be dependent on international agribusinesses, nutritionally valueless food, grain from Russia or Ukraine, food imports from China and other countries, or even be dependent on high priced organics to feed ourselves and their families. Each of us has the power to create our food from scratch. So, let’s walk through the history of the war gardens in the UK and US, which later evolved into what we know as the victory garden...


                _____________________________________________

                Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed

                (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                Never forget Excalibur.

                Comment

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