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Worldwide: 24 confirmed cases due to novel animal nCoV coronavirus - 16 fatalities - September 20, 2012 - May 2, 2013

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  • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

    I suggest to our friends in the media outlets to change their tags for the Jordan cases: 2 nCoV retrospectively confirmed in Jordan.

    This for the correct information and to avoid dissemination of unneeded panic.

    Comment


    • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

      Background and summary of novel coronavirus infection – as of 30 November 2012

      Over the past two months, WHO has received reports of nine cases of human infection with a novel coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses; different members of this family cause illness in humans and animals. In humans, these illnesses range from the common cold to infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS CoV).

      Thus far, the cases reported have come from Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Jordan. All patients were severely ill, and five have died.

      The two Qatari patients are not linked. Both had severe pneumonia and acute renal failure. Both are now recovering.

      A total of five confirmed cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. The first two are not linked to each other; one of these has died. Three other confirmed cases are epidemiologically linked and occurred in one family living within the same household; two of these have died. One additional family member in this household also became ill, with symptoms similar to those of the confirmed cases. This person has recovered and tested negative, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, for the virus.

      Two confirmed cases have been reported in Jordan. Both of these patients have died. These cases were discovered through testing of stored samples from a cluster of pneumonia cases that occurred in April 2012.

      The two clusters (Saudi Arabia, Jordan) raise the possibility of limited human-to-human transmission or, alternatively, exposure to a common source. Ongoing investigation may or may not be able to distinguish between these possibilities.

      The current understanding of this novel virus is that it can cause a severe, acute respiratory infection presenting as pneumonia. Acute renal failure has also occurred in five cases.

      WHO recognizes that the emergence of a new coronavirus capable of causing severe disease raises concerns because of experience with SARS. Although this novel coronavirus is distantly related to the SARS CoV, they are different. Based on current information, it does not appear to transmit easily between people, unlike the SARS virus.

      WHO has closely monitored the situation since detection of the first case and has been working with partners to ensure a high degree of preparedness should the new virus be found to be sufficiently transmissible to cause community outbreaks. Some viruses are able to cause limited human-to-human transmission under condition of close contact, as occurs in families, but are not transmissible enough to cause larger community outbreaks.

      Actions taken by WHO in coordination with national authorities and technical partners include the following:

      Investigations are ongoing to determine the likely source of infection and the route of exposure. Close contacts of confirmed cases are being identified and followed up.
      An interim surveillance recommendation has been updated to assist clinicians to determine which patients should undergo laboratory testing for the presence of novel coronavirus.
      Laboratory assays for the virus have been developed. Reagents and other materials for testing are available, as are protocols, algorithms and reference laboratory services. WHO has activated its laboratory network to assist in testing and other services. WHO has also issued preliminary guidance for laboratory biorisk management.
      Guidance is available for infection control.


      Based on the current situation and available information:

      WHO encourages all Member States to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.
      Further, testing for the new coronavirus of patients with unexplained pneumonias should be considered, especially in persons residing in or returning from the Arabian peninsula and neighboring countries. Any new cases should be promptly reported both to national health authorities and to WHO.


      In addition, any clusters of SARI or SARI in health care workers should be thoroughly investigated, regardless of where in the world they occur. These investigations will help determine whether the virus is distributed more widely in the human population beyond the three countries that have identified cases.

      WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event nor does it recommend that any travel or trade restrictions be applied.
      WHO continues to work with Member States and international health partners to gain a better understanding of the novel coronavirus and the disease in humans and will continue to provide updated information. As the situation evolves, WHO will reassess its guidance and revise it accordingly
      .http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coron...e_20121130/en/
      CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

      treyfish2004@yahoo.com

      Comment


      • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

        Epidemiological update: novel coronavirus
        30 Nov 2012


        ECDC
        On 30 November WHO updated the number of confirmed cases of pneumonia caused by the novel coronavirus which has been temporarily named hCoV-EMC. Between April 2012 and 30 November 2012, nine confirmed cases of infection with the novel coronavirus (of whom five died) have been reported to WHO, according to its case definitions. Severe acute respiratory disease was the common presentation of all cases.

        Five of the confirmed cases reside in Saudi Arabia (including three fatalities) two in Qatar and two in Jordan. Three of the confirmed cases from Saudi Arabia are from the same family household and there is also a fourth probable case. The second cluster with two confirmed cases (both fatal) has been retrospectively identified among eleven persons who became ill with acute respiratory disease in Jordan already in April 2012.
        Two of the cases were diagnosed after being transferred to Europe for further medical care.

        The reservoir and route of transmission of this virus has not been identified but all cases were reported from the Arabian Peninsula.
        The detection of two clusters could indicate limited person-to-person transmission or exposure to a common source. However, only careful investigation can help to distinguish between those two.

        On 26 November 2012, ECDC updated the Rapid Risk Assessment on severe respiratory disease associated with the novel coronavirus. The updated information from WHO at present does not change the conclusions of this assessment.
        ECDC conducted a survey on the laboratory capacity testing in EU/EEA member states in coordination with WHO Regional Office for Europe and the results are expected to be available next week.

        On 28 November, WHO updated the Interim surveillance recommendations for human infection with novel coronavirus.
        Healthcare professionals should be aware of the possibility of seeing patients matching the WHO case definition. Any probable or confirmed case being diagnosed in the EU/EEA area should be reported to the national authorities and then through the Early Warning Response System (EWRS) also to the Event Information Site of the WHO International Health Regulations.
        ECDC will continue to closely follow developments.

        Read more on ECDC website:

        Rapid Risk Assessment: Severe respiratory disease associated with a novel coronavirus, 26 September 2012
        Epidemiological update on third confirmed case of novel coronavirus, 6 November 2012
        Rapid Risk Assessment: Severe respiratory disease associated with a novel coronavirus of 24 Sep 2012
        External websites:
        RKI: Press Release on a case of Novel Coronavirus diagnosed in Germany
        WHO: Novel Coronavirus; Novel coronavirus infection - update
        UK: Genetic sequence information for scientists about the novel coronavirus 2012
        Recent Eurosurveillance article:
        The United Kingdom public health response to an imported laboratory confirmed case of a novel coronavirus in September 2012http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/press/news/...ews/Lists/News
        CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

        treyfish2004@yahoo.com

        Comment


        • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

          Coronavirus caused infections as early in April, tests show


          Helen Branswell, The Canadian Press

          Published Friday, Nov. 30, 2012 2:39PM EST

          TORONTO -- The World Health Organization has reported two additional cases of infection with the new coronavirus, the earliest on record.
          The agency says retrospective testing of stored samples show two people who died in Jordan in April were infected with the virus, which is from the same virus family as SARS.

          Prior to this the first known case had been a man from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who fell ill and died in June.
          The new report from the WHO brings to nine the number of confirmed infections with the new virus, of which five cases have been fatal.
          When it came to light that a new coronavirus was causing severe human illnesses in the Middle East, questions were raised about an outbreak of severe pneumonia cases that had occurred in Jordan in April.

          At the time health officials were not able to diagnose what was causing the illnesses, but stored samples from two of the patients tested positive recently for the new coronavirus.
          In a statement issued Friday, the WHO says Jordan's ministry of health has asked the global health agency for assistance in investigating the infections.
          A team from WHO's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and from WHO headquarters arrived in the Jordanian capital, Amman on Wednesday to help with studies aimed at trying to trace the source of infection and strengthen capacity to spot new cases.


          A potentially worrisome aspect of the Jordanian outbreak is that it involved health-care workers. Health-care workers can be unwitting sentinels in disease outbreaks, picking up infections from patients that they treat. If health-care workers become infected, that can often -- though not always -- be a sign a pathogen can spread from person to person.

          To date there has been no sign of sustained person-to-person spread of the virus, though there was a recent cluster of three and possibly four family members who got sick in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Two of them died.
          The Jordanian cases may signal spread from patients to health-care workers happened there. But it's too soon to conclude that, said WHO spokesperson Gregory Hartl, who noted the health-care workers and the patients could have been infected for a common -- and as yet unidentified -- source.
          "Even if the cases in Jordan were human-to-human spread -- and we don't know that -- it wasn't sustained," Hartl said in an interview from Geneva. He noted that there has been no sign of spread to health-care workers in Saudia Arabia or Qatar, the two other countries that have had cases, nor in London or Germany, where two of the cases have been treated.
          Hartl said with cases popping up over large distances in three different countries, and over months, much work remains to be done to figure out what is going on. "There are a lot of holes still to be filled in," he said.

          The WHO has asked countries to be on the lookout for possible cases in people with unexplained severe infections who have recently returned from or lived in countries in the Arabian Peninsula, or surrounding countries.
          To date the case count is as follows: Jordan, two, both fatal; Saudi Arabia, five, three fatal and Qatar, two.
          A report on the outbreak -- noted in a weekly disease report from the European Centre for Disease Control in May -- said seven nurses and a doctor were among 11 cases identified in the outbreak at a hospital in Zarqa, Jordan. http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronav...show-1.1060942
          CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

          treyfish2004@yahoo.com

          Comment


          • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

            This is case #3 in our list, the 45M gym teacher.

            http://www.smj.org.sa/DetailArticle.asp?ArticleId=5893

            Recovery from severe novel coronavirus infection

            Ali M. AlBarrak, Gwen M. Stephens, Roger Hewson, Ziad A. Memish

            ABSTRACT

            We describe the third confirmed case of novel coronavirus infection in a resident of the Arabian Peninsula. Our patient presented, as did 2 prior cases, with severe pneumonia and renal dysfunction requiring intensive care support including assisted ventilation. However, unlike the earlier cases, and despite underlying chronic disease and a single kidney, he survived his infection and has been discharged home. The Ministry of Health continues active surveillance for additional cases. As this case report goes to press, 2 additional confirmed cases have been identified in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Contact investigations are in progress. Future work will focus not only on the origin of the virus and mechanisms of transmission, but also the host factors that influence pathogenesis and prognosis.



            Saudi Medical Journal 2012; Vol. 33 (12): 1265-1269


            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            From the Department of Internal Medicine (AlBarrak), Infectious Disease Division, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, the Public Health Directorate (Stephens, Memish), Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the Health Protection Agency (Hewson), Porton Down, Salisbury, United Kingdom.
            Address correspondence and reprint request to: Dr. Ziad A. Memish, Ministry of Health, Riyadh 11176, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tel. +966 (1) 2124052. Fax. +966 (1) 2125052. E-mail: zmemish@yahoo.com


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            Comment


            • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

              What are the chances someone has a sample from the undiagnosed fatal respiratory outbreak that killed 5 people in Iraq in January 2008:

              http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=20090123.0295

              Could this virus have been circulating far longer than any of us have imagined?

              Comment


              • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

                The head of Rospotrebnadzor Russia warns of SARS in the Middle East


                02/12/2012, 16:32


                The head of Rospotrebnadzor, Russian doctor Gennady Onishchenko advised when planning winter do not forget the case of acute pneumonia (SARS) in the Middle East. Interview, "Interfax," Onishchenko said the number of patients with SARS in China East has developed den9: 2 people in Jordan, five in Saudi Arabia and two in Qatar. In Jordan and Saudi Arabia have deaths. World Health Organization of the United Nations assessment of the spread and not made barriers to international travel and trade. However, Mr. Onishchenko warned the Russians are prepared to travel the Middle East should remember about the situation in the region. Previously doctor Onishchenko advised people to winter holidays and New Year holidays in Russia, and if you go abroad, do not forget the precautions.
                http://vietnamese.ruvr.ru/2012_12_02/96618865/
                CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                Comment


                • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

                  Frequently Asked Questions on novel coronavirus

                  2 December 2012


                  What is the novel coronavirus?

                  This is a new strain of coronavirus that has not been previously identified in humans.
                  Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are known to cause illness in humans and animals. In humans, this large family of viruses are known to cause illness ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

                  What are the symptoms of novel coronavirus?

                  In confirmed cases of illness in humans, common symptoms have been acute, serious respiratory illness with fever, cough, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties. Based on current clinical experience, the infection generally presents as pneumonia. It has caused kidney failure and death in some cases. It is important to note that the current understanding of the illness caused by this infection is based on a limited number of cases and may change as more information becomes available.

                  Can it be transmitted from person to person?

                  This is not known with certainty at this time. The cases occurring in the same family raises the possibility of limited human-to-human transmission. Alternatively, it is possible that the infected family members were exposed to the same source of infection, for example, in a household or workplace.

                  How could I become infected with this virus?

                  To date, we do not know how humans have become infected with this virus. Investigations are underway to determine the virus source, types of exposure that lead to infection, mode of transmission and the clinical pattern and course of disease.

                  Is there a vaccine for the novel coronavirus?

                  There is no vaccine currently available.

                  Is there a treatment for the novel coronavirus?

                  There is no specific treatment for disease caused by novel coronavirus. However, many of the symptoms caused by this virus can be treated and therefore treatment should be based on the symptoms of the patient.

                  What can I do to protect myself?

                  Exactly how people become infected with this virus is not known at this time. However, some general measures that would be prudent and help prevent the acquisition of any respiratory illness are to avoid close contact, when possible, with anyone who shows symptoms of illness (coughing and sneezing), and to maintain good hand hygiene.

                  How many people have been infected by the novel coronavirus?

                  WHO is closely monitoring the situation and regularly publishes information about the disease. For more go to http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coron...infections/en/

                  How widespread is the novel coronavirus?

                  It is unknown how widespread this virus may be.
                  WHO is encouraging Member States to continue to closely monitor for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns of SARI or pneumonia. WHO will continue to share information as it is made available.

                  Are health workers at risk from the novel coronavirus?

                  Health care workers come into contact with patients with many different infectious illnesses more often than the general public. Therefore WHO recommends that health care workers consistently apply appropriate infection prevention and control measures.
                  http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coron.../en/index.html

                  Is the novel coronavirus like SARS?


                  SARS is a coronavirus that was identified in 2003 and belongs to the same large family of viruses as the novel coronavirus. Therefore, SARS and the novel coronavirus are distantly related. Both viruses are capable of causing severe disease. However, they have important differences based on current information. Most importantly, the novel coronavirus does not appear to transmit easily between people while the SARS virus was much more transmissible.

                  Is it true that this novel coronavirus originated from bats?

                  This is one possibility but the origin of the virus has not yet been established.

                  Can humans become infected with novel coronavirus from animals? If so, which ones should we be concerned about?

                  WHO is closely monitoring the situation to identify how people are being exposed. There is currently no direct evidence that the human cases were exposed through direct contact with animals.

                  How is WHO responding to the emergence of this novel coronavirus?

                  Since the emergence of this virus, WHO has been working under the International Health Regulations to provide information to Member States. WHO is also working with involved countries and international partners to coordinate the global health response, including the provision of updated information on the situation, guidance to health authorities and technical health agencies on interim surveillance recommendations, laboratory testing of cases, infection control, and clinical management, based on the current understanding of the novel virus and the disease in humans.
                  WHO will continue to work with Member States and international health partners and share updated information as it is made available.

                  What is WHO recommending countries do?

                  WHO encourages all Member States to enhance their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns of SARI or pneumonia cases.
                  WHO urges Member States to notify or verify to WHO any suspected or confirmed case of infection with novel coronavirus.

                  Has WHO recommended any travel or trade restrictions related to this new virus?

                  No. WHO does not recommend any travel or trade restrictions with respect to this event. WHO will continue to provide updated information as it is available.

                  http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coron.../en/index.html
                  CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                  treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                  Comment


                  • Re: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan: 9 confirmed cases due to novel animal coronavirus - 5 fatalities

                    http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php...121225.1468821

                    Published Date: 2012-12-25 19:00:19
                    Subject: PRO/AH> Novel coronavirus - Eastern Mediterranean (06): comments
                    Archive Number: 20121225.1468821

                    NOVEL CORONAVIRUS- EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (06): COMMENTS
                    ************************************************** *****
                    A ProMED-mail post
                    http://www.promedmail.org
                    ProMED-mail is a program of the
                    International Society for Infectious Diseases
                    http://www.isid.org


                    Date: Mon 24 Dec 2012

                    From: Danuta Skowronski <Danuta.Skowronski@bccdc.ca> [edited]





                    [Re: ProMED-mail Novel coronavirus - Eastern Mediterranean (05): WHO, transmission route 20121223.1465597]


                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


                    We would like to comment on 2 epidemiologic issues included in recent postings regarding the 2012 novel coronavirus (nCoV):



                    1. Failure (to date) of nCoV to transmit easily or sustainably between people.

                    This has been cited as an epidemiologic feature distinguishing nCoV from the 2003 SARS CoV. It is worth remembering, however, that despite being a substantial global concern, SARS CoV was also not generally very transmissible. [1] It required certain conditions of close contact (hospital or household) or facilitated transmission (aerosol generating procedures) to achieve person-to-person spread and was strikingly a nosocomial-associated infection throughout. SARS CoV did not ultimately achieve the status of a pandemic, failing to exhibit widespread community transmission in most countries. Low inherent transmissibility combined with a delay in peak infectivity until well into the course of serious illness may explain why SARS was primarily a nosocomial infection; why so few countries experienced outbreaks; and why it could ultimately be extinguished. Seasonality may have also played a role. [1]



                    2. The "index case" for the April 2012 Jordan nCoV cluster could not be determined.

                    The index case in an epidemiologic investigation is the 1st recognized case. Lessons learned from SARS instead emphasize the importance of "Patient Zero", the 1st case whether initially recognized or not. [2] While this may seem a matter of semantics, the distinction has implications for the prevention of onward transmission. Mathematical models for SARS, incorporating contact network theory, have stressed the importance of Patient Zero in predicting epidemic likelihood -- determined by the transmissibility of the agent, the number of contacts of Patient Zero, and the number of people infected between Patient Zero (the 1st case) and intervention on the index case (the 1st recognized case). [3]



                    Patient Zero thus tests the baseline capacity of a system to respond to emerging threats before they are known or recognized. [2]



                    As such, Patient Zero commands advance and ongoing attention to infection control precautions in the management of all SARI [severe acute respiratory illness], notably that of unknown etiology; emphasizes the need for strong, well-coordinated surveillance systems, with particular vigilance for clusters involving health care workers as signal if not incipient events; and underscores the need for efficient communication networks to disseminate public health alerts and enhance awareness before additional cases or clusters occur.



                    References


                    ----------


                    1. Skowronski DM, Astell C, Brunham RC, et al: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): A year in review. Annu Rev Med 2005; 56: 357-81. Doi: 10.1146/annurev.med.56.091103.134135. [Abstract available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15660517].

                    2. Skowronski DM, Petric M, Daly P, et al: Coordinated response to SARS, Vancouver, Canada. Emerging Infect Dis 2006; 12(1):155-8. Available at <http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/...27_article.htm.

                    3. Meyers LA, Pourbohloul B, Newman MEJ, Skowronski DM, Brunham RC: Network theory and SARS: predicting outbreak diversity. J Theor Biol 2005; 232(1): 71-81. [Abstract available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15498594].



                    --

                    Danuta Skowronski MD, FRCPC

                    Naveed Z Janjua MBBS, DrPH

                    Influenza & Emerging Respiratory Pathogens Team

                    BC Centre for Disease Control

                    Canada

                    <Danuta.Skowronski@bccdc.ca>

                    [ProMED-mail would like to thank Drs Skowronski and Janjua for their comments and observations on epidemiological issues related to this novel organism.



                    We are currently very early in our understanding of the epidemiology of this organism, including understanding what the mechanism of exposure and subsequent transmission of this organism to humans is, as it is genetically most closely related to a bat coronavirus seen in Hong Kong. If one postulates that the organism has not as yet evolved into an efficient person-to-person transmitted organism, then a key piece of information necessary at present is finding out the reservoir of the organism (? bats in the countries where human cases have occurred) and how these "species jumps" are occurring -- are the bats transmitting this organism (the nCoV) to another animal that is in the food chain so that humans then have contact with contaminated bodily fluids (similar to the situation with the SARS coronavirus and civet cats)? Or perhaps, as ProMED-mail subscriber Merritt Clifton has postulated, are these bats contaminating fruit with infected saliva that is then ingested by people in the area (similar to the transmission of Nipah virus in Bangladesh)? Hence, identification of the index case(s) in these clusters might help address these questions (as well as studies on the prevalence of the nCoV in bats and other animals having contact with people in the affected areas. - Mod.MPP]

                    Comment


                    • Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK - co-infection with H1N1pdm09

                      Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK
                      11 February 2013

                      The Health Protection Agency (HPA) can confirm the diagnosis of a further case of novel coronavirus infection in a UK resident, who had recently travelled to the Middle East and Pakistan. The patient is receiving intensive care treatment in a Manchester hospital. This latest case brings the total number of confirmed cases globally to 10, of which two have been diagnosed in the UK.

                      Professor John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases department at the HPA, said: "The HPA is providing advice to healthcare workers to ensure the patient under investigation is being treated appropriately and that healthcare staff who are looking after the patient are protected. Contacts of the case are also being followed up to check on their health.
                      “Our assessment is that the risk associated with novel coronavirus to the general UK population remains extremely low and the risk to travellers to the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding countries remains very low. No travel restrictions are in place but people who develop severe respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, within ten days of returning from these countries should seek medical advice and mention which countries they have visited.
                      “Since the first case of novel coronavirus was diagnosed in the UK in September 2012, the HPA has maintained increased vigilance for illness caused by this virus, working closely with national and international authorities including the WHO and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). We have also produced updated guidance for health professionals in the UK on the investigation and management of possible cases.”
                      Professor Maria Zambon, director of reference microbiology services at the HPA, said: “A battery of laboratory tests have been developed by the HPA to test for coronavirus infection when cases of severe respiratory illness are identified, which are not explained by other infectious causes. These tests, which detect the presence of virus in the body, are available for use by selected frontline HPA laboratories.
                      “In mid-November the HPA published the full genome sequence from the first UK patient, enabling scientists around the world to understand more about the diversity of this virus. This will help with efforts to determine the origin of the virus and develop strategies for treatment and prevention.”
                      Coronaviruses are causes of the common cold but can also include more severe illness, such as SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome). This new coronavirus was first identified in September 2012 in a patient who died from a severe respiratory infection in June 2012. The virus has so far only been identified in a small number of cases of acute, serious respiratory illness who presented with fever, cough, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties.
                      ENDS
                      Notes to editors:
                      1. Laboratory confirmed cases to date: 10
                      Saudi Arabia: 5 (3 deaths)
                      Jordan: 2 (2 deaths)
                      UK: 2 (1 patient from Qatar – receiving treatment, 1 patient from UK – receiving treatment)
                      Germany: 1 (patient from Qatar – discharged) http://www.hpa.org.uk/NewsCentre/Nat...aviruspatient/
                      CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                      treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                      Comment


                      • Re: Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK

                        Second UK case of 'Sars-like' coronavirus identified
                        11 February 2013 Last updated at 09:08 ET


                        By Michelle Roberts
                        Health editor, BBC News online

                        A second case of a new respiratory illness similar to the deadly Sars virus has been identified in the UK.

                        The patient, who is receiving intensive care treatment in a Manchester hospital, had recently travelled to the Middle East and Pakistan.


                        Doctors insist the risk of the new coronavirus spreading to the general UK population is "extremely low" and the situation is being closely monitored.

                        The total number of confirmed cases globally now stands at 10.

                        The death toll is five - three patients treated in Saudi Arabia and two treated in Jordan.


                        Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses ranging from the common cold to the Sars (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus, spread through droplets of body fluids produced by sneezing and coughing.

                        In 2002 an outbreak of Sars killed about 800 people after the virus spread to more than 30 countries around the world.

                        The new coronavirus was first identified in September 2012 in a patient in Saudi Arabia who has since died.

                        Soon after, officials identified another case - this time in the UK. The 49-year-old man in question had been transferred to St Thomas' hospital in London by air ambulance from Qatar.

                        Five months on, a second UK case has been found.

                        Prof John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases department at the Health Protection Agency (HPA), said: "The HPA is providing advice to healthcare workers to ensure the patient under investigation is being treated appropriately and that healthcare staff who are looking after the patient are protected. Contacts of the case are also being followed up to check on their health."

                        No travel restrictions are in place.

                        But Prof Watson said people who developed severe respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, within 10 days of returning from the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding regions should seek medical advice and mention the countries they have visite
                        d.http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21410190?
                        CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                        treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                        Comment


                        • Re: Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK

                          UK resident in intensive care after contracting potentially fatal SARS-like virus
                          By ANNA HODGEKISS
                          PUBLISHED: 09:38 EST, 11 February 2013

                          A UK resident is in intensive care after contracting a potentially fatal Sars-like virus.
                          The unnamed patient, who has recently travelled to the Middle East and Pakistan, is being treated in a Manchester hospital after becoming infected with a new type of coronavirus, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) said.
                          The latest case brings the total number of confirmed cases across the world to 10, the HPA added...



                          Professor John Watson, head of the respiratory diseases department at the HPA, said: 'The HPA is providing advice to healthcare workers to ensure the patient under investigation is being treated appropriately and that healthcare staff who are looking after the patient are protected. Contacts of the case are also being followed up to check on their health.
                          'Our assessment is that the risk associated with novel coronavirus to the general UK population remains extremely low and the risk to travellers to the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding countries remains very low.
                          'No travel restrictions are in place but people who develop severe respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, within 10 days of returning from these countries should seek medical advice and mention which countries they have visited.'


                          Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...#ixzz2KbPb54qP
                          Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
                          CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                          treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                          Comment


                          • Re: Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK

                            New SARS-like virus infects British patient in 10th case globally
                            Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:22am EST

                            (Reuters) - A new virus from the same family as SARS that sparked a global alert last September has been found in a further patient in Britain, health officials said on Monday.

                            This latest case of infection with the new virus known as a coronavirus brings the total number of confirmed cases globally to 10, of which five have died.

                            The British patient, who had recently traveled to the Middle East and Pakistan, is receiving intensive care treatment in hospital in Manchester, northern England.

                            The new virus shares some of the symptoms of SARS, or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - a coronavirus which emerged in China in 2002 and killed about a tenth of the 8,000 people it infected worldwide. The symptoms include severe respiratory illness, fever, coughing and breathing difficulties.

                            The virus was identified when the World Health Organisation (WHO) issued an international alert in September 2012 saying a virus previously unknown in humans had infected a Qatari man who had recently been in Saudi Arabia.

                            Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA) said among the 10 laboratory confirmed cases to date, five had been in Saudi Arabia, with three deaths; two were in Jordan, where both patients died; two were in Britain, where both are receiving treatment; and one was in Germany in a patient from Qatar who had since been discharged from medical care.

                            The agency said in a statement on Monday it was providing advice to ensure the latest British patient was treated appropriately and healthcare staff were protected.

                            People who have had contact with the patient are also being tracked to check on their health.

                            "Our assessment is that the risk associated with novel coronavirus to the general UK population remains extremely low and the risk to travelers to the Arabian Peninsula and surrounding countries remains very low," the HPA said.

                            Coronaviruses are typically spread like other respiratory infections, such as flu, travelling in airborne droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

                            The WHO said in September that from its initial investigations, it appeared this virus did not spread easily from person to person.http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...91A0LA20130211
                            CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                            treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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                            • Re: Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK

                              ..A UK resident is in intensive care after contracting a potentially fatal Sars-like virus, health experts confirm.

                              The man, who is critically ill with breathing problems, has been isolated in a Manchester hospital while he receives treatment for "novel coronavirus".Half of the people known to have been infected with the bug so far have died.

                              The Health Protection Agency (HPA) believes he picked up the lung virus while travelling to the Middle East and Pakistan.

                              It says the risk to people in the UK is "very low".

                              Professor John Watson, the agency's head of respiratory diseases, said: "The HPA is providing advice to healthcare workers to ensure the patient is being treated appropriately and that staff who are looking after the patient are protected.

                              "Contacts of the case are also being followed up to check on their health."

                              The man is being treated in the intensive care unit at Wythenshawe Hospital.

                              University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the hospital, said in a statement: "Our staff already follow strict guidelines on treating patients with unknown illnesses and have been wearing personal protective equipment at all times since their initial contact.

                              "Visitors are being limited and they too will follow strict safety guidelines.
                              "http://news.sky.com/story/1050646/uk...ars-like-virus
                              CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                              treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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                              • Re: Case of novel coronavirus identified in the UK

                                The UK resident returned from Saudi Arabia at the end of last month before falling ill on January 31st.

                                He was transferred to Wythenshawe at some point in the last few days after being infected with a new type of coronavirus.

                                The latest case of the condition is only the second confirmed in the UK, and the tenth worldwide. All those that have contracted the disease had recently visited the Middle East.

                                The HPA says there the man's family is showing no symptoms of the virus, and confirmed there is so far no evidence to suggest it can be passed from person-to-personhttp://www.itv.com/news/granada/upda...y-fatal-virus/
                                CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                                treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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