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Netherlands Antilles - Aruba - H1N1 Cases - 25

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  • Netherlands Antilles - Aruba - H1N1 Cases - 25

    According to PAHO, Aruba has 13 cases of A/H1N1.

  • #2
    Re: Netherlands Antilles - Aruba - Cases - 25

    H1N1 spreading quickly in Aruba

    ARUBA--Aruba's Directorate Public Health announced Sunday that there were twelve new cases of the AH1N1 virus. Aruba now has 25 registered cases of infected persons.

    Children under the age of 15 years are not allowed into hospitals for the time being, now that an employee of the children’s ward has possibly contracted the "Mexican influenza," as well as three children of that section. Furthermore, the visitors’ hours have been restricted.

    Moreover, it was announced that there was a case of another infection source. Of the twelve new cases, only one had had direct contact with the infected athletes during the recent volleyball tournament in Trinidad.

    Of the other eleven persons, it is unknown how the "swine flu" spread. The twelve infected people are isolated at home and have slight flu symptoms. According to epidemiologist Maribel Tromp, all infected persons are residents of the island.

    The virus is currently spreading without government even knowing where exactly it comes from. "The reason why it is spreading so rapidly is that it concerns a very mild form of influenza. People not even aware of having contracted the Mexican influenza are therefore spreading the virus at work or in other public areas," according to Tromp.

    There are other flu viruses that show the same symptoms, such as the Rhinovirus as well as the usual flu.

    Horacio Oduber Hospital announced that a worker of the children’s section had possibly contracted the Mexican influenza, as well as three patients. The results will be announced later this week, according to spokesperson Bob Harms.

    The employees are under treatment and have been sent home, while the three young patients are being treated in the hospital. Children under the age of 15 years are not allowed to enter the hospital for the time being, in order to prevent further spreading.

    The visitors’ hours were also restricted and are now from twelve o’clock until one o’clock in the afternoon and from seven until eight o’clock in the evening. The number of visitors is also restricted, so that only two people are allowed to visit a patient per visiting hour.

    The hospital will strictly adhere to the measures, says Harms, although exceptions are made for parents visiting their young children. They will receive a so-called continual visitor’s pass from the hospital. The same applies for people whose family members are at death’s doorstep.

    Furthermore, the hospital has placed hand soap dispensers on all floors, as well as at the main entrances of the hospital. Persons showing flu symptoms such as high fever, dry cough and sore throat are requested not to visit the hospital, but first contact the Diagnostic Centre.

    Harms explained that visitors for the radiology department should contact the hospital first upon any signs of mentioned flu symptoms. Subsequently, the route to the hospital and the ward will be explained to them.

    Seven cases of the Mexican influenza have been registered so far on Curaçao; nearly four times less than Aruba, even though the neighbouring island is twice as large and has double the population.

    Harms: "This could be due to the fact that on Curaçao less people visit the doctor compared to Aruba. The threshold is somewhat lower on Aruba, as a doctor’s visit is fully reimbursed by the medical insurer AZV."


    http://www.thedailyherald.com/news/d...4/flum044.html
    ?Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights ? that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

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