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The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit of the United States

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  • #61
    Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit

    Originally posted by Snicklefritz View Post
    OK. But, please remember that the internet is a meritocracy where the best ideas rise to the top. In my opinion, there is a danger that agreeing on a message, and a course of action could also homogenize the forums and result in a loss of their piquant flavor and unique ambiance of ideas.
    I agree. We will keep our identity, methodologies, and mission intact. Also, we are the only Section 501(c)(3), I believe, among the "bird flu" sites.

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    • #62
      Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit

      why don't they create their own flublogia ?
      I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
      my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

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      • #63
        Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit

        Good news about this online summit. One request: as this is an international forum and there are many nationalities contributing, could you please add the epiteth "of the United States" to the announcement titles so that it is clear what country we are talking about? I think this would also contribute greatly to a sense of colleagiality among us all. Look forward to it.

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        • #64
          Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit

          Originally posted by cozodapo View Post
          Good news about this online summit. One request: as this is an international forum and there are many nationalities contributing, could you please add the epiteth "of the United States" to the announcement titles so that it is clear what country we are talking about? I think this would also contribute greatly to a sense of colleagiality among us all. Look forward to it.

          Cozodapo - thank you for the suggestion. I have renamed the thread and the future posts will carry United States in the title also.

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          • #65
            Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit of the United States

            InKy, just attach a forum to the pandemicflu.gov webpage.

            A forum is a blog, which works even without bloggers and continues
            when the blog ends.

            Are they ready for free discussion or do they need to direct
            it with previleged starting messages as in a blog ?
            I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
            my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

            Comment


            • #66
              Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit of the United States

              Sister Patricia Talone Says:

              It is heartening to know that some leading pharmaceutical companies are donating pre-vaccines to the World Health Organization.

              I must admit that I have had a nagging worry that companies might use a flu pandemic to maximize an opportunity for business advancement.


              This may sound cynical, but we have certainly seen this with companies lining their coffers because of contracts to “rebuild” Iraq.

              Some might call such actions pragmatic, but I believe they are deplorable. They contribute to the notion of the “Ugly American” who values financial gain over transparency, and the well-being of an international community.

              I would hope that HHS can use its influence to encourage other pharmaceutical companies to do likewise.


              Posted June 16th, 2007 at 9:51 pm http://blog.pandemicflu.gov/?p=100#comment-3398

              The bolding is mine - Fla1

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              • #67
                Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit of the United States



                Posted by
                Sister Patricia Talone
                RSM, PhD; Vice President, Mission Services, Catholic Health Association. I have worked in Catholic health care for over twenty years as an ethicist and mission administrator.






                A way to engage everyone…

                At the end of the HHS Summit last week in DC, a reporter asked, “besides feeling good that this group gathered, what results will we see from this meeting? “


                Actually, I think there will be some concrete results (and I will speculate about them later), but I have been pondering this query on several levels. The implication seemed to be that gathering a group of high-level leaders to talk about the possibility of a flu pandemic was simply talk. In our test-taking, measurement-oriented American society, conversation or significant discourse is viewed by many to be a waste of time without outcomes. I know that I come from a different era than many of the people attending the summit, but I believe that engaging in focused discussion with other persons can significantly change hearts and minds. Margaret Wheatley, writer and organizational consultant, has said that “in these troubled, uncertain times, we don’t need more command and control; we need better means to engage everyone’s intelligence in solving challenges and crises as they arise.”


                Secondly, it has struck me that Secretary Leavitt, and the department of HHS has taken a risk in the very process of inviting commentary, feedback, criticism and participation regarding the topic of pandemic flu. One of the limitations of traditional media is that it is so passive. One can sit back on one’s couch and read or watch or listen and absorb what another person thinks or wants you to think. A blog demands that one consider one’s own convictions, opinions, etc. At its best, it can stimulate critical thinking.

                Thirdly, the Summit drew together leaders, leaders from various professions, backgrounds and walks of life. It was not necessarily an assembly of like-minded individuals prepared to do group-speak. The lectures and discussions evoked learning, reflection and mutual challenges, as well as provided a forum for necessary networking. Martin Luther King, Jr. asserted, “we must learn to live together as brothers (and sisters) or perish together as fools.”


                Such a summit is an excellent vehicle to stimulate dialogue and generate commitment from community leaders. It is a start in the long and challenging process of promoting public awareness of and commitment to the health of individuals and our society.


                There are and will be concrete results flowing from last week’s meeting. Among these are:



                1. Dissemination of materials and resources (from HHS, CDC and other relevant sources). Many of these have and will continue to be shared on this blog as well as on Flu Wiki and other blogs.



                2. Determination to develop, review and/or evaluate policies and procedures for hospitals, clinics, schools, businesses - any organizations that bear responsibility for the good of society.



                3. Stronger bonding between and among these organizations. The enormity of the challenge forces one to realize that no individual or organization can handle this possibility alone. Author Flannery O’Connor maintained that “the truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.” Recognizing that we are sisters and brothers to one another, we must extend our hands and strengthen the bonds that tie us together.


                I applaud Secretary Leavitt and Admiral Agwunobi for taking the risk to educate the public through this blog, and to challenge a variety of leaders to carry forth their message of preparedness. Although I realize that my sphere of influence may seem small, I now have a clearer insight into the ways that I can galvinize Catholic health care (and other Catholic ministries) for the challenge of a pandemic. Leaders throughout Catholic health care are expressing great interest in this topic and many are developing plans to respond to a pandemic within their facilities and communities.




                http://blog.pandemicflu.gov/?p=106

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                • #68
                  Re: The National Pandemic Preparedness Blog Summit of the United States

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                  Posted by
                  Michael O. Leavitt
                  Secretary, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

                  Posts (5)
                  View Bio

                  Closing Thoughts

                  As we close the HHS Pandemic Flu blog, I want thank all of you for participating. The passion of respondents was a happy surprise to me. I have come to understand there is an army of well trained and motivated people who understand this issue and the need for a sustained concentrated effort.
                  This is the first time I have participated in a blog like this one. It has created an appetite for more. Citizens want to hear from their government leaders and there is value in government leaders hearing from citizens.
                  Educating Americans about the need for individual and family pandemic preparedness is a major part of our mission at HHS. We wanted to bring leaders from health care, business/labor, community and faith-based organizations together but knew a one day meeting wouldn?t be enough so we created a blog to extend the conversation and engage more voices.
                  Every one of us has a role to play?educating others, thinking about those with fewer resources who may face obstacles to preparedness.
                  We will provide community leaders with information and resources on pandemic planning to share with others. Also, we will be identifying around ten communities across the country for increased communications and technical support. The purpose is to identify best practices that can be replicated in other communities across the United States.
                  Thanks again to all the participants and unique perspectives, the commenters for their engagement and the many thousands of visitors from around the world.
                  Posted July 2, 2007 at 3:58 pm in Message from the Secretary

                  http://blog.pandemicflu.gov/?p=111




                  </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                  http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

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