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Evaluating and Managing Patients Exposed to Birds Infected with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) A (H5) Viruses ( Dec 2015)

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  • Evaluating and Managing Patients Exposed to Birds Infected with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) A (H5) Viruses ( Dec 2015)

    from the CDC. . .

    Evaluating and Managing Patients Exposed to Birds Infected with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) A (H5) Viruses

    During 2014-2015, outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5 (HPAI H5) occurred in wild birds and poultry in the United States. While no human infections with these HPAI outbreaks have been detected, rare human infections with other avian influenza viruses have occurred and it is possible that people may be infected by these viruses. In particular, people involved in HPAI H5 poultry outbreak response activities and others with exposures to infected birds or surfaces contaminated by feces from infected birds may be at risk of HPAI H5 virus infection. All HPAI H5outbreak responders, including those who used personal protective equipment (PPE), are being asked to self-observe for signs and symptoms consistent with influenza on a daily basis and to call their health department if they develop compatible illness. Health departments may ask responders to seek care and/or testing for influenza A virus infection, including testing for H5 virus. . . . .

    Signs/Symptoms of HPAI H5 virus infection in humans: Persons with HPAI H5 virus infection may present with influenza-like illness (ILI) [fever ≥100°F plus cough or sore throat] or with other signs and symptoms frequently associated with seasonal influenza, such as rhinorrhea, fatigue, myalgia, arthralgia, headache, and difficulty breathing. Atypical presentations of HPAI H5 virus infection may include nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Encephalopathy and encephalitis also have been reported with HPAI H5 virus infections. While a rare sign of seasonal influenza, conjunctivitis has been reported as a sign of infection with some avian influenza A viruses. Rapid progression to pneumonia and multi-organ failure can occur with HPAI H5 virus infection.

    It is important to remember that influenza may not cause fever in all patients, especially in patients younger than 5 years of age, 65 years of age and older, or people with immunosuppression. The absence of fever should not supersede clinical judgment when evaluating a patient for illness compatible with HPAI H5 virus infection. For more information on signs and symptoms, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/hpai...al-illness.htm. For HPAI H5 case definitions, visit http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/hpai...efinitions.htm.

    Infection prevention and control recommendations: Standard Precautions, plus Contact and Airborne Precautions are recommended when evaluating patients for HPAI H5 virus infections. If an airborne infection isolation room (AIIR) is not available, isolate the patient in a private room. Health care personnel should wear recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) when providing patient care. These recommendations are consistent with existing infection control guidance for care of patients who may be infected with a novel influenza A virus associated with severe disease. For more information on recommended infection prevention and control measures, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/nove...on-control.htm. . . . . More information and links at: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/clin...g-patients.htm
    http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/
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