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Afghanistan - Not a political thread: Potential large public health threat as government falls - August 15, 2021 - population total is approx. 38 million

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  • #46



    Kaitlan Collins

    @kaitlancollins
    ·
    39m
    “As of now, the Taliban are not permitting the charter flights to depart,” Secretary Blinken says, adding the Taliban are claiming “some do not have the required documentation.” Blinken says they are working on it.
    17
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    Kaitlan Collins

    @kaitlancollins
    ·
    38m
    “We’ve made clear to all parties, we’ve made clear to the Taliban, that these charters need to be able to depart. And we continue every day, virtually every hour to work on that,” Blinken says.

    Comment


    • #47

      In memory of 11 September 2001 - Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings, op.11.

      ..and to all those who have suffered since - including now.

      Our deepest condolences.

      The Team at FluTrackers



      Comment


      • #48


        World Health Organization (WHO)

        @WHO
        ·
        6m
        "This will likely lead to serious reductions in services, threatening the gains we've made in maternal & child mortality over the past 20 years, causing disruption to #COVID19 vaccinations & jeopardising the progress to #EndPolio in #Afghanistan"-
        @DrTedros
        Quote Tweet

        World Health Organization (WHO)
        @WHO
        · 7m
        "Health facilities have already closed and several NGOs have scaled down their operations"-@DrTedros #Afghanistan
        Show this thread

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        • #49
          Taliban official: Strict punishment, executions will return

          By KATHY GANNON
          today

          KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — One of the founders of the Taliban and the chief enforcer of its harsh interpretation of Islamic law when they last ruled Afghanistan said the hard-line movement will once again carry out executions and amputations of hands, though perhaps not in public.

          In an interview with The Associated Press, Mullah Nooruddin Turabi dismissed outrage over the Taliban’s executions in the past, which sometimes took place in front of crowds at a stadium, and he warned the world against interfering with Afghanistan’s new rulers.

          “Everyone criticized us for the punishments in the stadium, but we have never said anything about their laws and their punishments,” Turabi told The Associated Press, speaking in Kabul. “No one will tell us what our laws should be. We will follow Islam and we will make our laws on the Quran.”
          ...
          https://apnews.com/article/religion-...5b5b5435a9de54
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #50
            Source: https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/09/1101742


            Afghanistan: Rapid decline in public health conditions, WHO warns
            29 September 2021
            Healthcare provision is deteriorating fast in Afghanistan, the UN health agency warned on Wednesday, with cases of measles and diarrhoea shooting up, and polio becoming a “major risk”.

            According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the COVID-19 response has also declined and almost half of the country’s children are at risk of malnutrition.

            Moreover, the agency pointed out that only 17 per cent of the over 2,300 health facilities previously supported by the World Bank, are fully functional, two-thirds of which have run out of essential medicines...

            Comment


            • #51
              US pledges to pay relatives of Afghans killed in August drone strike

              Updated: 5:06 AM CDT Oct 16, 2021
              AP

              The U.S. Defense Department said Friday that it is committed to offering condolence payments to relatives of the 10 people who were killed in an errant U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan, in August.

              Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said in a statement that the Defense Department was also working with the State Department to help surviving family members relocate to the United States.

              Kirby said the matter arose in a meeting Thursday between Dr. Colin Kahl, under secretary of defense for policy, and Dr. Steven Kwon, founder and president of the nonprofit group Nutrition & Education International.

              “Dr. Kahl reiterated Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin’s commitment to the families, including offering ex gratia condolence payments,” Kirby said. He did not say how much money would be offered.

              https://www.wisn.com/article/us-pled...trike/37978901

              Comment


              • #52
                https://www.military.com/daily-news/...tary-says.html
                Lone Suicide Bomber with 'Disturbing Lethality' Carried Out Kabul Airport Attack, US Military Says

                4 Feb 2022
                Military.com | By Rebecca Kheel

                The blast outside the Kabul airport that killed 13 American troops in August was caused by a single suicide bomber, despite initial descriptions from U.S. officials that it was a "complex" attack, military officials said Friday as they unveiled the findings of an internal investigation into the attack.
                ...
                "The investigation found that a single explosive device killed at least 170 Afghan civilians and 13 U.S. service members by explosively directing ball bearings through a packed crowd and into our men and women at Abbey Gate," U.S. Central Command chief Gen. Frank McKenzie said in opening remarks at a press briefing about the investigation. "The disturbing lethality of this device was confirmed by the 58 U.S. service members who were killed and wounded despite the universal wear of body armor and helmets that did stop ball bearings that impacted them but could not prevent catastrophic injuries to areas not covered."...
                _____________________________________________

                Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed

                (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                Never forget Excalibur.

                Comment


                • #53

                  Afghan women ordered to wear burqa



                  Comment


                  • #54
                    The burqas shouldn't be a public health issue as long as infrastructure allows them to be kept clean.

                    War does cause serious global public health issues. Trying to keep traumatic battlefied or IED injuries sterile is impossible.

                    https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2607/9/11/2229/htm
                    Higgins, P.G.; Kniel, M.; Rojak, S.; Balczun, C.; Rohde, H.; Frickmann, H.; Hagen, R.M. Molecular Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated at the German Military Field Laboratory in Mazar-e Sharif, Afghanistan. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 2229. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9112229
                    ...

                    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has been identified as a considerable menace for traumatic wounds associated with international wars and crises [1,2]. This also applies to the recent military conflict in Afghanistan, in which German soldiers participated for nearly 20 years, from 2002 until 2021.

                    Most reports on war trauma-associated A. baumannii infections or colonization from the recent Afghanistan conflict were, however, provided by the medical services of the USA and Canada [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11]. As early as 2004, a report on a limited number of A. baumannii-associated bloodstream infections associated with Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan was published [3]. In 2006, carbapenem-resistant isolates were still reported to be acquired predominantly in Iraq and less frequently in Afghanistan [4]. One year later, however, Canadian health officials published warnings about the risk of spreading multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains imported into Canadian hospitals from Afghan battlefields [5]. Subsequently, in 2008, the US Armed Forces Medical Service reported an increased frequency of A. baumannii isolates associated with osteomyelitis in war-injured soldiers fighting for the OEF mission [6], and in the same year, an increased acquisition risk of resistant A. baumannii isolates at OEF deployment sites was documented [7]. Together with Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, A. baumannii accounted for nosocomial infection rates of 2–4% in injured patients from the OEF mission [8], and a risk of spreading resistance was identified. However, as reported in 2011, the colonization rate with A. baumannii was highest at the beginning of the mission and declined in the following years [9]. Nevertheless, the relevance of resistant or even multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains in the wounds of war-injured US trauma patients remained considerable, accounting for 38.6% of the registered infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria [10]. In a recent study on trauma-related infections in US soldiers, Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from 8.7% of skin and soft tissue infections, 9.0% of bloodstream infections, and 11.0% of osteomyelitis cases, [11]. Consequently, research on substances potentially inactivating A. baumannii in traumatic war injuries is ongoing [12].
                    ...
                    References
                    • Davis, K.A.; Moran, K.A.; McAllister, C.K.; Gray, P.J. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter extremity infections in soldiers. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 2005, 11, 1218–1224. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • O’Shea, M.K. Acinetobacter in modern warfare. Int. J. Antimicrob. Agents 2012, 39, 363–375. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Acinetobacter baumannii infections among patients at military medical facilities treating injured U.S. service members, 2002–2004. MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 2004, 53, 1063–1066. [Google Scholar]
                    • Hujer, K.M.; Hujer, A.M.; Hulten, E.A.; Bajaksouzian, S.; Adams, J.M.; Donskey, C.J.; Ecker, D.J.; Massire, C.; Eshoo, M.W.; Sampath, R.; et al. Analysis of antibiotic resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter sp. isolates from military and civilian patients treated at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2006, 50, 4114–4123. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Stuart, T.L.; Mulvey, M.; Simor, A.E.; Tien, H.C.; Battad, A.; Taylor, G.; Vayalumkal, J.V.; Weir, C.; Ofner, M.; Gravel, D.; et al. Acinetobacter baumannii in casualties returning from Afghanistan. Can. J. Infect. Control 2007, 22, 152–154. [Google Scholar] [PubMed]
                    • Yun, H.C.; Branstetter, J.G.; Murray, C.K. Osteomyelitis in military personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. J. Trauma 2008, 64 (Suppl. 2), S163–S168. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
                    • Calhoun, J.H.; Murray, C.K.; Manring, M.M. Multidrug-resistant organisms in military wounds from Iraq and Afghanistan. Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. 2008, 466, 1356–1362. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Murray, C.K.; Yun, H.C.; Griffith, M.E.; Thompson, B.; Crouch, H.K.; Monson, L.S.; Aldous, W.K.; Mende, K.; Hospenthal, D.R. Recovery of multidrug-resistant bacteria from combat personnel evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan at a single military treatment facility. Mil. Med. 2009, 174, 598–604. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Hospenthal, D.R.; Crouch, H.K.; English, J.F.; Leach, F.; Pool, J.; Conger, N.G.; Whitman, T.J.; Wortmann, G.W.; Robertson, J.L.; Murray, C.K. Multidrug-resistant bacterial colonization of combat-injured personnel at admission to medical centers after evacuation from Afghanistan and Iraq. J. Trauma 2011, 71 (Suppl. 1), S52–S57. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Campbell, W.R.; Li, P.; Whitman, T.J.; Blyth, D.M.; Schnaubelt, E.R.; Mende, K.; Tribble, D.R. Multi-Drug-Resistant Gram-Negative Infections in Deployment-Related Trauma Patients. Surg. Infect. 2017, 18, 357–367. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
                    • Weintrob, A.C.; Murray, C.K.; Xu, J.; Krauss, M.; Bradley, W.; Warkentien, T.E.; Lloyd, B.A.; Tribble, D.R. Early Infections Complicating the Care of Combat Casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. Surg. Infect. 2018, 19, 286–297. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
                    • Bogue, A.L.; Panmanee, W.; McDaniel, C.T.; Mortensen, J.E.; Kamau, E.; Actis, L.A.; Johannigman, J.A.; Schurr, M.J.; Satish, L.; Kotagiri, N.; et al. AB569, a non-toxic combination of acidified nitrite and EDTA, is effective at killing the notorious Iraq/Afghanistan combat wound pathogens, multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter spp. PLoS ONE 2021, 16, e0247513. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
                    • Vandersee, S.; Hannemann, M.; Herrmann, F.; Becker, P. Multiresistente Erreger bei Patienten des deutschen Bundeswehr-Einsatzlazaretts in Masar-e Sharif. Hyg. Med. 2011, 36, 384–392. [Google Scholar]
                    • Helm, F. Einsatzsurveillance. ISAF und die Maxime des Inspekteurs. Wehrmed. Wehrpharm. 2013, 1, 40–45. [Google Scholar]
                    • Lesho, E.; Clifford, R.; Onmus-Leone, F.; Appalla, L.; Snesrud, E.; Kwak, Y.; Ong, A.; Maybank, R.; Waterman, P.; Rohrbeck, P.; et al. The Challenges of Implementing Next Generation Sequencing Across a Large Healthcare System, and the Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria in the Healthcare System of the U.S. Department of Defense. PLoS ONE 2016, 11, e0155770. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
                    • Karah, N.; Wai, S.N.; Uhlin, B.E. CRISPR-based subtyping to track the evolutionary history of a global clone of Acinetobacter baumannii. Infect. Genet. Evol. 2021, 90, 104774. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
                    And so on....
                    _____________________________________________

                    Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                    i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed

                    (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                    Never forget Excalibur.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Imho burqas are bad for public mental health. Forcing 1/2 of the population (based on sex) to wear one uniform, certain garment that covers the entire body, including the face, when going outside of the home, is not conducive to positive mental health on a large scale.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        https://www.komu.com/news/midmissour...ccf2c7cad.html
                        Columbia College honors Marine killed during Afghanistan evacuationCOLUMBIA — Columbia College held two commencement ceremonies in the Southwell Complex gymnasium Saturday, but out of 405 graduating students, one degree recipient stands out from the rest.

                        Marine Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo holds her certificate of reenlistment with the Marines at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California.
                        Courtesy of the Pichardo Family

                        Marine Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo was one of 13 Marines killed by a suicide bomb during the US evacuation out of Afghanistan in August 2021. When she was killed, she was screening women and children near Kabul's airport attempting to flee the country, according to reporting from the Columbia Missourian. She was 25 years old.
                        ...

                        In an essay Pichardo wrote about why she was going to college, she highlighted her wish to make her mother proud.

                        "I decided to attend college to make my mother proud when I receive my degree and because it'll open a lot more doors for me and make me more valuable," Pichardo wrote.
                        ...

                        When asked about how she wanted her daughter to be remembered, Colosa Pichardo pointed to her face and smiled.

                        "Her smile, intelligent, beautiful, positive, very caring and dedicated to be a better person," she said.

                        She added that her daughter's memory will live on in the minds of her family and that the unimaginable loss was hard to describe....

                        _____________________________________________

                        Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                        i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed

                        (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                        Never forget Excalibur.

                        Comment

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