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Many neglect dehydration in influenza

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  • St Michael
    replied
    Re: Many neglect dehydration in influenza

    Here is an english measurement recipe for a rough equivalent of the WHO oral rehydration solution using household ingredients:

    (3) Mix Amounts Below

    8 Teaspoons Sugar
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon baking soda
    1/4 teaspoon Potassium Chloride
    in 1 Liter of clean water


    Potassium Chloride: use Morton's Salt Substitute

    Listed below are the top salt substitutes and the amounts of potassium and sodium in each.

    No Salt? -- 1/4 tsp.: 650 mg. Potassium/0 mg. sodium

    Morton's Lite Salt? -- 1/4 tsp.: 350 mg. Potassium/290 mg. sodium

    Morton's Salt Substitute? -- 1/4 tsp.: 610 mg. Potassium/
    0 mg. sodium

    Cardia Salt Alternative? -- 1/4 tsp.: 180 mg. Potassium/270 mg. Sodium

    Leave a comment:


  • St Michael
    replied
    Re: Many neglect dehydration in influenza

    To prevent too much liquid being lost from the child's body, an effective oral rehydration solution can be made using ingredients found in almost every household. One of these drinks should be given to the child every time a watery stool is passed. Ideally these drinks (preferably those that have been boiled) should contain: starches and/or sugars as a source of glucose and energy, some sodium and preferably some potassium.

    Oral Rehydration Solutions: Made at Home

    To prevent too much liquid being lost from the child's body, an effective oral rehydration solution can be made using ingredients found in almost every household. One of these drinks should be given to the child every time a watery stool is passed.

    Ideally these drinks (preferably those that have been boiled) should contain:

    starches and/or sugars as a source of glucose and energy,
    some sodium and
    preferably some potassium.

    Preparing a 1 (one) litre oral rehydration solution [ORS] using Salt, Sugar and Water at Home

    Mix an oral rehydration solution using one of the following recipes; depending on ingredients and container availability:

    Ingredients:

    one level teaspoon of salt
    eight level teaspoons of sugar
    one litre of clean drinking or boiled water and then cooled
    5 cupfuls (each cup about 200 ml.)

    Leave a comment:


  • St Michael
    replied
    Re: Many neglect dehydration in influenza


    Dehydration Treatment Plans


    *Treatment plans taken from the CDD/WHO Supervisory Skills course, from the module on the treatment of diarrhoea. - What to do if dehydration occurs

    What is dehydration?

    Dehydration is the loss of water and body salts through diarrhoea. Early features are difficult to detect but include dryness of mouth and thirst. The signs of dehydration include: sunken fontanelle (in infants); fast, weak pulse; breathing faster than normal; loss of skin elasticity; sunken, dry eyes and reduced amount of urine. Rehydration is the correction of dehydration.


    What is ORT?

    ORT is the giving of fluid by mouth to prevent and/or correct the dehydration that is a result of diarrhoea. As soon as diarrhoea begins, treatment using home remedies to prevent dehydration must be started. If adults or children have not been given extra drinks, or if in spite of this dehydration does occur, they must be treated with a special drink made with oral rehydration salts (ORS). The formula for ORS recommended by WHO and UNICEF contains:

    3.5 gms sodium chloride
    2.9 gms trisodium citrate dihydrate (or 2.5 gms sodium bicarbonate)
    1.5 gms potassium chloride
    20 gms glucose (anhydrous)

    The above ingredients are dissolved in one litre of clean water. WHO has recently recommended a change in the complete formula, replacing 2.5 gms of sodium bicarbonate with 2.9 gms of trisodium citrate dihydrate. The new formula gives the packets a longer shelf life and is at least as effective in correcting acidosis and reducing stool volume. Packets containing sodium bicarbonate are still safe and effective.

    Leave a comment:


  • St Michael
    started a topic Many neglect dehydration in influenza

    Many neglect dehydration in influenza

    Many neglect dehydration in influenza

    1/15/2006

    PHOENIX, Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Many underestimate seasonal flu's severity and neglect treating dehydration, a survey of U.S. physicians and consumers found.

    Fifty-seven percent of doctors surveyed said they considered dehydration the single most dangerous flu side effect.

    "Severe flu symptoms like fever and body aches often keep patients from taking in adequate fluids," said Dr. Leanne M. Chrisman-Khawam of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. "By managing symptoms, one will be more likely to manage their dehydration as well."

    The "Zicam Flu Survey" also uncovered a potentially dangerous doctor-patient disconnect regarding the perception of flu's severity. While nearly 80 percent of doctors said they consider flu to be a "very severe" or "extremely severe" illness compared to other typical illnesses, only 42 percent of consumers agreed.
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