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  • Conjunctivitis outbreaks in India

    Haryana:

    Eye flu strikes flood-hit areas

    Sushil Manav
    Tribune News Service

    Fatehabad, August 30
    Viral conjunctivitis, also called eye flu, has spread in several parts of the district. It is particularly severe in areas affected by the recent floods.

    “I have been receiving a large number of patients suffering from viral conjunctivitis for the past over 15 days.

    “The numbers are increasing by the day,” said a private medical practitioner in Ratia. Jaswant Singh, a farmer from Meond Kalan near Jakhal, said several persons from his village were suffering from red eyes.

    Viral conjunctivitis is associated with inflammation that results from swelling of small blood vessels which, in turn, makes the eyes red.

    Highly contagious, it can spread from one person to another through direct contact. Overcrowded places and dirty surroundings can worsen the ailment. People may be infected by a handshake, through use of common towels/clothes or even exchange of currency notes.

    “The humidity in the area after the rains and floods has created conditions congenial to the spread of eye flu,” said Dr VK Jain, SMO, Primary Health Centre, Ratia.

    He, however, maintained that the disease was now on regression and the number of cases coming to hospitals has started to decline.
    http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20100831/haryana.htm


    Rajasthan:
    Now 'flu' victim Eyes

    Source: Bhaskar network | Last Updated 04:40 (30/08/10)
    Quota. Breeding seasons in the virus came from the city in the number of patients suffering from flu is increasing rapidly.

    These days Hadoti MBS's biggest state hospital eye department in the outdoor 175 of 150 patients per day coming. 80 percent of these patients did have the flu. Moisture of the atmosphere due to viral Adino Kanjkati Aaitiss (I flu) is spreading. Brought in the number of patients suffering from flu is increasing rapidly. MBS Hospital Eye Department in the coming outdoor patients did 80 percent of patients coming flu.

    Assistant Acharya Dr. Jayashree Singh came flu disease is not fatal. Only seasonal disease, which is recovering from 6-7 days to take drugs. Viral Adino's eyes focused on the 7-day lives. Relation flu and swine flu came together there is not. Ahanei two different viruses. H-1 and N -1 is the swine flu caused by viruses.

    I flu symptoms

    The patient's eyes are red. Swelling on the eyelids and eyes watering sounds. Then come Geer Peanineuma eye looks. The problem seems to be coming to see the bright lights.

    I treat flu prevention

    Been suffering from flu and take medical advice from the Anti Bectoiriyal Potaansiteroyts take medication. Adino viral antiviral drugs are not effective.
    http://www.bhaskar.com/article/RAJ-O...s-1311893.html

    Chandigarh:

    Eye flu spreads wings in city

    Arun Sharma
    Tribune News Service

    Chandigarh, August 23
    With other seasonal diseases and infections, conjunctivitis, caused by pathogens (viral or bacterial), has begun to spread its wings in the city. Though only a few patients have been visiting the hospitals and dispensaries as of now, the number may increase drastically in the coming days, as this virus spreads very fast from one person to another.

    Acute conjunctivitis is caused by viral and bacterial infection, spread by touch, whether directly or indirectly. The infection usually spreads during the monsoon season and the symptoms are: redness of the eye, discharge, itching and watering.

    Every day there are one or two patients reaching the dispensary of Sector 28, says Dr Rajiv Kaplia. At PGI, patients are coming for treatment at the OPD, says Dr Amod Gupta, professor and head of ophthalmology.

    Whenever a patient of conjunctivitis touches the infected eye, the bacteria is transferred from his fingers on to any place he touches, and thus he infects other persons as well, says Gupta.

    The virus has an incubation period of one month, and only one and foolproof method to avoid it is not to touch the eyes without proper washing of hands, Gupta said. And in case one contracts the infection, he or she must consult an eye specialist, as self -medication can be harmful. However, if it is not possible to consult a doctor immediately, one can keep an ice cube wrapped in a thin cloth over the eyes, which will provide some relief to the patient, said Gupta.

    However, one needs to be cautious, as other eye diseases and infections too have similar symptoms, as that of conjunctivitis. There are many patients who avoid medication thinking it to be conjunctivitis thus aggravating the problem, said Gupta.

    Only a doctor can diagnose the exact cause of the problem and prescribe the required medication, he added.

    http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20100824/cth1.htm

    Punjab:

    Eye flu rages

    Our Correspondent

    Hoshiarpur, August 27
    A large number of cases of eye flu being reported in the Government hospitals and private clinics these days here. Most of the patients complain of redness and severe pain in eyes along with thick discharge.

    Dr Y.C. Markan, Civil Surgeon here said yesterday that keeping in view the large number of cases of conjunctivitis, he had directed all Senior Medical Officers to examine these patients on priority and educate masses on the disease.

    He particularly stressed to stop use of contact lenses on getting conjunctivitis. Dr Markan warned against the use of steroids without the advice of eye specialist and in case conjunctivitis does not subside in three/four days eye doctors should be contacted.
    http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/20030828/punjab1.htm
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

  • #2
    Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

    Jammu

    Conjunctivitis grips Jammu, thousands affected
    RAJEEV SHARMA

    Jammu, Sept 1: With thousands of people developing sore eyes across Jammu region, the highly contagious, viral conjunctivitis (locally known as eye flu), has sent panic waves among the people, particularly in remote areas where the disease is spreading like an epidemic.
    On an average 20 to 30 patients suffering from conjunctivitis are visiting the Government Medical College and Hospital, here for treatment.
    Official sources said the conjunctivitis had gripped Poonch and its adjoining areas as over 800 patients affected with this disease had been reported so far. Sources added out of the total number of patients, 15 percent were children.
    Sources said the disease had also shown its presence in border district of Rajouri where hundreds of people suffering with eye sore were visiting the hospital.
    According to an eye specialist in Poonch hospital, 80 per cent of patients coming to the hospital were affected with conjunctivitis and it was spreading to Mendhar, Surankote and Mandi.
    The people suffering from the disease have developed sore eyes with many finding their eyes shut, as if there is something monstrous inside their eyes which must be flushed out.
    Eye specialists said the infection mostly spreads in April or May, but this time the epidemic had occurred too late during the year. “It may be difficult to predict the duration. The only way to prevent it is by maintaining the best hygienic standards and ensure the patients remain in isolation during the first three days of the infection,” they advised.
    “It is important that children with conjunctivitis do not go to school till they are cured. So is the case with office-goers. The family members of an infected person should quarantine him, till there are no traces of infection. He should not share towels and handkerchiefs with the other members,” they advised.
    “This month, the ophthalmology department in GMCH, has recorded at least 40 per cent of their patients suffering with conjunctivitis. Among the first few who contracted the infection were students and office-goers,” sources said, adding over thousand patients so far had been treated in the hospital.
    Dr Mengi, Head of Department of Ophthalmology in GMCH, said the influx of patients suffering from eye flu has declined as compared to last few days. “On an average 20 to 25 patients suffering from conjunctivitis are visiting the hospital on routine basis. The influx of patients has shown somewhat decline in past two days.”
    He however, said some patients treat the eye complexities at their own level by using eye drops and other antibiotics, adding people tend to seek medical help only when severe complications develop.
    Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of a thin transparent membrane covering the eyeball called conjunctiva. The symptoms of conjunctivitis are redness, watering and mild discharge. It is a viral infection but when it doubles up as a bacterial infection, it can affect the cornea.'
    The patient is advised to stay in isolation during that time. Doctors say the infection spreads when a patient, after touching the eye, touches another object which may be touched by a healthy person.
    Meanwhile, the eye flue has created panic waves among the policemen, among whom the infection is spreading quickly, in border districts of Rajouri and Poonch.


    Lastupdate on : Wed, 1 Sep 2010 21:30:00 Mecca time
    Lastupdate on : Wed, 1 Sep 2010 18:30:00 GMT
    Lastupdate on : Thu, 2 Sep 2010 00:00:00 IST
    http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/2...ffected-33.asp
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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    • #3
      Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

      Punjab:

      'Pink eye' takes over Ludhiana
      TNN, Sep 4, 2010, 09.09pm IST

      LUDHIANA: After other waterborne diseases, it's time for eye flu as an upsurge of cases related to the condition has been witnessed in city .

      'Acute conjunctivitis is caused by viral and bacterial infection, spread by touch, whether direct or indirect. The infection usually spreads during monsoon and the symptoms are redness of the eye, discharge, itching and watering,' said Dr Gurkirat Bajwa, senior ophthalmologist at Dayanand Medical College and Hospital.

      Dr Bajwa added that whenever a patient of conjunctivitis touched the infected eye, the microbes got transferred to his fingers and subsequently, to any other place he contacted. 'That way he can infect other persons as well,' he added.

      Dr Bajwa added that 25 to 30% of patients visiting his OPD these days were suffering from this condition.

      Senior ophthalmologist of Apollo Hospital, Dr Harpreet Singh, said these cases were surfacing due to increased humidity.

      He added that it was very important to take precaution and if the ailment persisted for more than three to four days, a visit to doctor was must as eye flu could reduce vision and cause other complications.

      http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...#ixzz0yaPykvpV
      Twitter: @RonanKelly13
      The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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      • #4
        Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

        also in Hanoi:
        http://www.saigon-gpdaily.com.vn/Health/2010/9/85286/
        they say it's Adenovirus
        I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
        my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

          New Delhi:

          After dengue, city in grip of viral eye flu
          Sanchita Sharma, Hindustan Times
          Email Author
          New Delhi, September 08, 2010First Published: 23:50 IST(8/9/2010)
          Last Updated: 23:53 IST(8/9/2010)

          After the onslaught of dengue and H1N1, the city is witnessing a spurt in cases of a severe form of conjunctivitis, which lasts for up to 10 days, instead of the usual week-long period. Not only does the infection last longer, but it also infects the cornea, leading to blurry vision and sensitivity to light.

          "The infection lasts 7 to 10 days instead of the usual 5 to 7 days. In one in every five cases, the cornea is also infected along with the conjunctiva," said Dr Mahipal Sachdev, director, Centre for Sight, where 20-30 conjunctivitis cases are being treated every day.

          "The long summer and extended monsoon have led to a spurt in cases over the past two weeks. This seasonal outbreak is expected to last for another month," said Dr Jeewan Singh Titiyal, head of Dr Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

          Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva — the transparent membrane that lines the eyelid and part of the eyeball — usually caused by viral infection. The infection causes the tiny blood vessels in the conjunctiva to swell, giving a pink or red tinge to the whites of the eyes. The swollen vessels make the eyes feel gritty and painful, causing a watery discharge.

          "Though viral isolation has not been done, the clinical look is of an adenoviral (a type of virus) conjunctivitis. Cases of super-added bacterial conjunctivitis are also coming," said Sachdev.

          Hospitals and clinics have been flooded with conjunctivitis patients over a month, with the cornea of one in every five patients being infected. Normally, conjunctivitis is a self-limiting condition and, like all viral infections, gets over without treatment within a week. This outbreak, however, has been characterised by an infection that causes itchiness and tearing for up to 10 days.

          "Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and patients are advised to wash their hands frequently besides using separate towels and linen," said Titiyal.

          Viral conjunctivitis with watery discharge goes away on its own and, at most, requires warm compress — cloth soaked in warm water — applied to closed eyes to soothe the discomfort. A thick discharge indicates bacterial infection, which can be treated with antibiotic eye drops.

          http://www.hindustantimes.com/After-...e1-597847.aspx
          Twitter: @RonanKelly13
          The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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          • #6
            Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

            Karnataka:

            Conjunctivitis cases on the rise in Bangalore
            Rashmi Menon Bangalore, Sep 13, DHNS:

            Caught in a bind by dengue and H1N1 outbreaks, Bangaloreans now have another big irritant to contend with: conjunctivitis.


            Over the last week, cases of this eye infection have soared, with one city hospital recording as many as 350 cases. Doctors say this is a more virulent form of conjunctivitis. “We have been noticing more conjunctivitis cases since Friday. The number has gone up,” said Dr Kaushik Murali, consultant ophthalmologist at Sankara Eye Hospitals at Marathahalli. The scene has become so scary that the hospital gets nearly 25 cases every day.

            The monsoon is suspected to have triggered the escalation. “We are seeing both viral and bacterial infections. However, viral infection takes much more time to heal than bacterial. Also clinically, a person with viral conjunctivitis has a little fever, not much discharge, redness in eyes and has to be treated symptomatically,” said another doctor at the hospital. Dr MC Modi Charitable Eye Hospital, too, has seen a spurt in the number of cases. The daily inflow of patients is about 50 to 60 cases, with about 10 per cent severe in nature. Dr Suvarna Modi of the hospital said usually conjunctivitis cases are seen in May or June due to increase in pollen.

            “I don’t know the reason for this sudden increase. It could be the sudden change in the season,” she said. Even Dr Sriprakash KL, medical superintendent, Minto Ophthalmic Hospital, confirmed that there has been a 5 to 6 per cent rise in the cases since last week.

            According to Navshakti Nethralaya’s Dr Elankumaran, there has been an almost five- to ten-fold increase in the number of conjunctivitis cases in the last few weeks. “This is a viral conjunctivitis, as a viral one always occurs as an epidemic and spreads faster. However, this time, the viral infection is affecting the cornea that could affect the vision if not treated on time,” he said.

            Once cornea is affected, it is treated only by administering mild steroids. Apparently, 10 per cent of the total conjunctivitis patients were exhibiting this problem. The treatment time has also increased in viral infection, felt Dr Elankuraman. “Earlier, a patient would get better by a week’s time. Now, the infection itself takes two weeks with recovery taking another one week. However, in cases where the cornea is affected, it takes six to eight weeks for the eye to heal,” he said.

            Swelling of the eyes and eyelids are noticeable symptoms. “More than pain, patients feel foreign body sensation as each time the patient blinks it would feel like sandpapers being rubbed in the eyes,” explained the doctor. Interestingly, Dr Elankumaran feels that the epidemic has started early, since he was expecting it to begin in November or December
            http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...bangalore.html
            Twitter: @RonanKelly13
            The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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            • #7
              Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

              BANGALORE: After the onslaught of dengue and H1N1, the city hospitals and clinics are now witnessing a spurt in cases of conjunctivitis.

              "At least 20 patients are being treated everyday for conjunctivitis," said Dr Savita Arun, Ophthalmologist at Nehtradhama Superspeciality Eye Hospital. "We have witnessed a rise in conjunctivitis cases since the last one week."

              "With such an inflow of patients everyday, we have set up isolated consulting rooms at the hospital so that others are not affected by the infection," she said.

              Dr K S Sriprakash, head of the department and Medical superintendent at Minto Ophthalmic Hospital said the hospital is getting about 20 patients everyday. He said cases have gone up since the last week.

              "It is a bacterial infection that is taking five to six days to get cured," he said.

              "The infection lasts for one week, but in nearly 10 per cent of the patients coming with the problem, the cornea is also infected along with the conjunctiva leading to blurry vision and sensitivity to light," said Dr K Bhujang Shetty, chairman of Narayanan Nethralaya.

              Even the Sankara Eye Hospital treated nearly 350 patients with bacterial and viral infection in the last one week.

              Conjunctivitis is an infection of the conjunctiva - the transparent membrane that lines the eyelid and part of the eyeball - usually caused by viral infection.

              The infection causes the tiny blood vessels in the conjunctiva to swell, giving a pink or red tinge to the whites of the eyes.

              The swollen vessels make the eyes feel gritty and painful, causing a watery discharge.

              Emphasising on the preventive measures, the eye specialists said viral conjunctivitis was highly contagious and patients were advised to wash their hands frequently, besides using separate towels and linen.

              If a person in the family is infected, he should be quarantined and medical attention sought.

              http://expressbuzz.com/cities/bangal...-r/207850.html

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

                how does it spread
                I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

                  How is conjunctivitis spread?
                  Conjunctivitis is spread by:

                  ■Direct contact with the infected person’s eye drainage or drainage from the person’s cough, sneeze, or runny nose
                  ■Indirect contact with objects that may have the infected person’s drainage on them (i.e. eye makeup applicators, towels, shared eye medications)
                  ■Contact with the infected person’s fingers or hands which may contain the virus or bacteria

                  http://www.in.gov/isdh/21205.htm
                  Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                  The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

                    Pune, Maharashtra

                    City sore with conjunctivitis
                    By: Alifiya Khan Date: 2010-09-24 Place: Pune

                    Doctors report 30% rise in cases compared to last year

                    The city is grappling with the swine flu epidemic, and now it has to contend with yet another infectious disease. Cases of conjunctivitis, commonly known as the pink-eye syndrome, have been on the rise.


                    Eye-sore: Cases of conjunctivitis in the city have been rising.

                    According to ophthalmologists, who see between six to seven cases every day, the rise in number of cases is almost 30 per cent compared to last year. Dr Jignesh Taswala, president of Poona Ophthalmological Society, said that 50 per cent of patients coming to clinics across the city were suffering from eye infection.

                    Festival to blame?
                    "The patients started increasing since last week of August. The increase in cases started actually after Ganesh festival and while taking history of patients we realised that the spread of infection is taking place because of migrant population coming in for festivities," he said.

                    While at most times, conjunctivitis isn't a serious infection, in a few cases the infection has been severe leading to haemorrhage in the eyes doctors said.

                    "The infection usually starts in one eye and then spreads to the other. Sometimes the ear is also affected. However the main issue is haemorrhage or bleeding in eyes which has been seen in quite a few cases," said Dr Santosh Bhide, opthamologist at Ruby Hall Clinic.

                    Dr Geetanjali Sharma, ophthalmologist at Deenanath Mangeshkar hospital said that the key to control the epidemic was to stay away from crowded areas and stay clean.

                    "Firstly, the more people go out into the crowds greater the chance of getting infected. Also, there is a wrong notion that if people stare into an infected person's eyes they will contract the disease. Actually people get infected because they share towels, and shake hands as basically the infection spreads through touch," she said.

                    http://www.mid-day.com/news/2010/sep...unctivitis.htm
                    Last edited by sharon sanders; September 25, 2010, 07:38 AM. Reason: added bolding.
                    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

                      Madhya Pradesh:
                      Conjunctivitis = Aetiss Kanjncti, often referred to in India as "I flu".


                      Hindi to English translation
                      I have the flu, the cold water Seken eyes
                      Source: Times News | Last Updated 10:34 (25/09/10)

                      Gwalior seems these days are people in town, whose lives and those red eyes are swollen too. They wear dark glasses or I actually Aetiss Kanjncti viral flu victims. It is spreading rapidly. Eye specialist Dr. DK Shakya are told, and ways to avoid the symptoms of the disease ..

                      That is transmitted: the virus from direct contact with infected patients is transmitted. Virus from a patient's hands to touch the infected eye drops. The way he combines another Wikthyse hand, the virus is transferred. Eyes of the white part and a membrane on the inside of the eyelids that Kanjanctoiwa says. This film came to be affected by the virus called influenza. Infection in the membrane swelling, redness occurs.

                      Identify symptoms: eye Kirkiri, irritation and itching, tears come, Lalpan, swelling, mild fever, sore Akras etc. are symptoms.

                      How to rescue:

                      I contact a specialist immediately take proper treatment, clean cool water to close the eyes take heat, do not use during Conteancto lens, eye drops, according to the doctor's advice to Ug, relax at home, others do not arm Mix , not Mslaan eyes, hands and face thoroughly with soap and wash. Special: normally the disease is itself out in one to two weeks.
                      http://www.bhaskar.com/article/MP-i-...s-1399464.html
                      Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                      The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in Northern India

                        Bihar:

                        Jai Bangla' hits city
                        TNN, Sep 23, 2010, 08.35pm IST

                        PATNA: Dreaded eye disease, commonly known as conjunctivitis or "Jai Bangla", has infected several people in the state capital.

                        More and more patients are visiting eye specialists these days with symptoms like watering red and swollen eyes and irritation. Conjunctivitis first affects one eye and the infection might spread to the other eye as well in the next two to three days. Once infected, it generally takes three to four days to get cured.

                        It is a highly contagious disease and doctors advise people suffering from it to be cautious so that the disease does not infect their family members or colleagues. It generally spreads after a patient rubs his/her eyes and then shakes hands with others or uses the same utensils, office files or any other material without washing hands properly.

                        Doctors advise those living in the vicinity of such patients to frequently wash their hands with soap to avoid getting infected by the disease.

                        Noted ophthalmologist and former president of the All India Ophthalmological Society, Dr Ajit Sinha, said all red eyes should not be considered a case of "eye flu". Those suffering from excessive redness and pain, especially in one of the eyes, should immediately consult an eye doctor, he added. "Avoid using steroid eye drops and do not use eye drops at the recommendation of any medicine storekeeper," Dr Sinha said.

                        "Protective glasses, hand sanitizers and separate handkerchiefs play a vital role in preventing the spread of the disease. In some cases, the infection could be so severe that patients might suffer from subconjunctival haemorrhage in which the eyes appear totally red," said Vitreo Retina consultant Dr Pooja Sinha.



                        Read more: Jai Bangla' hits city - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...#ixzz10XOkO3iY
                        Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                        The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in India

                          Delhi

                          Eye flu hits India camp but no panic
                          Saurabh Duggal, Hindustan Times
                          Email Author
                          New Delhi, September 26, 2010First Published: 23:18 IST(26/9/2010)
                          Last Updated: 23:19 IST(26/9/2010)

                          There’s bad news from the Indian camp. The women’s hockey team, which was runners-up at the last edition of the Commonwealth Games, and won the title at Manchester in 2002, has been struck by eye flu. Nearly half the team is down with the infection. It started with skipper Surinder Kaur getting infected during the camp at National Institute of Sports, Patiala, last week. Soon after, Surinder's room-mate, Poonam, and video analyst, Nalini, got infected.

                          After checking into the Games Village on Saturday, three more members of the squad, Jasjeet Kaur, Joydeep and Kiran, have been struck.

                          “Eye flu is causing a big problem. It started with one player and now it’s spreading. We’ve got the girls medicated and are hoping it doesn't affect more girls. Otherwise we will be in big trouble,” said a member of the support staff.

                          “After Surinder got infected during the Patiala camp, we sent her home. She is back to training and Nalini has also recovered. But Jasjeet, Joydeep and Kiran are still down. We are in touch with doctors in the Village and hopefully they will recover in the next two-three days,” he added. Jasjeet is the penalty corner expert and Joydeep is a key member in defence and their absence will definitely affect the team's performance. “We are taking care that the girls with eye flu practice separately so that we don't get fresh cases,” said a team official.

                          Despite the trying times, coaches, Sandeep Somesh and Pritam Siwach, are confident that the team, like in the previous editions, will be ready to give its best for the country.

                          No practice match

                          While other nations will play a few practice matches, the women's team will not get any such opportunity before the Games. “It would have been better had we played a couple of matches. After returning from the World Cup in Argentina we haven't played a match,” said a team member.

                          http://www.hindustantimes.com/Eye-fl...e1-604941.aspx
                          Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                          The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Conjunctivitis outbreaks in India

                            Karnataka

                            Antibiotic to treat eye flu out of stock

                            Express News ServiceFirst Published : 09 Oct 2010 02:19:43 AM ISTLast Updated :


                            BANGALORE: Sudhir, who has red eyes due to conjunctivitis, spent nearly four hours searching for eye drops on Thursday evening. He tried at pharmacies in R T Nagar, Shivajinagar, Yelahanka and New Town, but to no avail. Wherever he enquired about eyedrops with ciprofloxacin, he was told that the medicine was out of stock.


                            Even as conjunctivitis has hit Bangalore in a big way, patients are running from pillar to post to get eyedrops with ciprofloxacin, which is in short supply.


                            No supply since a week

                            An employee at Cash Pharmacy said their supply of the eyedrops had exhausted. He added that they had received no fresh stock since one week. An employee of another medical shop said even other medical shops were asking them if they had the antibiotics. The employee added that most of the medical shops had not received any supply since the past few days.

                            Medical Director of Shekar Nethralaya, Dr Rajashekar, said during the time of infection, people buy the eyedrops for self medication. He added that over-the-counter sales too resulted in shortage of the antibiotic.

                            He said eyedrops that have ciprofloxivin were commonly used by non-eye specialists. Dr Arun Samprathi of Samprathi Eye Clinic said as the preferred eyedrop was out of stock, doctors were now opting for alternative antibiotics such as gatigloxacin.

                            He added that eyedrops with ciprofloxacin were widely used but it should not be overused as it may make the bacteria resistant to the antibiotic. Dr Sreeprakash, Medical Superintendent of Minto Ophthalmic Hospitals, said they were not recommending ciprofloxacin but prescribing alternative drugs to the patients
                            http://expressbuzz.com/cities/bangal...ck/213651.html
                            Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                            The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

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