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Timing of routine infant vaccinations and risk of food allergy and eczema at one year of age

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  • Timing of routine infant vaccinations and risk of food allergy and eczema at one year of age

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...12830/abstract
    Kiraly N, Koplin JJ, Crawford NW, Bannister S, Flanagan KL, Holt PG, Gurrin LC, Lowe AJ, Tang MLK, Wake M, Ponsonby A-L, Dharmage SC, Allen KJ. Timing of routine infant vaccinations and risk of food allergy and eczema at one year of age. Allergy 2016; 71: 541–549
    • Study registration: This observational study was registered with ANZCTR, trial ID ACTRN12614001193662.
    • Edited by: Stephan Weidinger

    Keywords:

    • Atopic hypersensitivity;
    • food allergy;
    • eczema;
    • DTaP vaccine;
    • infant



    Abstract

    Background

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that routine vaccinations can have nontargeted effects on susceptibility to infections and allergic disease. Such effects may depend on age at vaccination, and a delay in pertussis vaccination has been linked to reduced risk of allergic disease. We aimed to test the hypothesis that delay in vaccines containing diphtheria–tetanus–acellular pertussis (DTaP) is associated with reduced risk of food allergy and other allergic diseases.


    Methods

    HealthNuts is a population-based cohort in Melbourne, Australia. Twelve-month-old infants were skin prick-tested to common food allergens, and sensitized infants were offered oral food challenges to determine food allergy status. In this data linkage study, vaccination data for children in the HealthNuts cohort were obtained from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. Associations were examined between age at the first dose of DTaP and allergic disease.


    Results

    Of 4433 children, 109 (2.5%) received the first dose of DTaP one month late (delayed DTaP). Overall, delayed DTaP was not associated with primary outcomes of food allergy (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.77; 95% CI: 0.36–1.62, P = 0.49) or atopic sensitization (aOR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.35–1.24, P = 0.19). Amongst secondary outcomes, delayed DTaP was associated with reduced eczema (aOR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34–0.97, P = 0.04) and reduced use of eczema medication (aOR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.24–0.83, P = 0.01).


    Conclusions

    There was no overall association between delayed DTaP and food allergy; however, children with delayed DTaP had less eczema and less use of eczema medication. Timing of routine infant immunizations may affect susceptibility to allergic disease.


    Never forget Excalibur.
    “‘i love myself.’ the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever.” ---- nayyirah waheed
    Avatar: Franz Marc, Liegender Hund im Schnee 1911 (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
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