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  • #16
    reading the whole context of the Bresalier paper, it becomes clear to me that
    when he speaks about the absence of catarrh in 1890,
    then he must have meant the frequent absence of respiratory catarrhal symptoms
    in Russian flu cases in England,1889/90.
    And not the absence of the disease "catarrhal fever" or "bronchial catarrh(same as bronchitis ?)"
    which were common classifications before(and after ?) 1889 in England and elsewhere for
    commonly occurring diseases.
    If there was indeed widespread mild H1-influenza in England before ~1892 then this
    "catarrhal fever" should be the most likely classification that they gave to it.
    The registrar general used "influenza", though.
    Now, to explain the age-distribution curve of deaths in 1918 and according to our
    modern pandemic understanding that H1 should have vanished after 1892.

    But I can't find anything about it. They must have noticed the decrease of the
    previously common catarrhial fever that came in waves like mild influenza ?!?
    If it existed.
    I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
    my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

    Comment


    • #17
      And whether it was maybe also prevalent in horses (and dogs
      or even other species)..
      And whether that H1 was (almost) killed in 1890-1895 or reassorted
      This is later in time, gsgs, but there was a recognition of something called influenza in farm animals and horses by the second decade of the 1900's and serums and vaccines were being produced for it:

      http://books.google.com/books?id=AJM...luenza&f=false
      Service and Regulatory Announcements, Issues 93-116
      By United States. Bureau of Animal Industry

      Here's a source on influenza with some details that you might find helpful. It says the very young and old were being affected, and that there were complicated and uncomplicated cases. Breathing very cold air was linked to the complicated cases.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...404144/?page=1
      Br Med J. 1894 Apr 21; 1(1738): 846–848. PMCID: PMC2404144
      On Influenza, 1893-94
      Peter Eade
      Never forget Excalibur.
      “‘i love myself.’ the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever.” ---- nayyirah waheed
      Avatar: Franz Marc, Liegender Hund im Schnee 1911 (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)

      Comment


      • #18
        https://books.google.com/books?id=Lhc6AQAAMAAJ
        Influenza: An Epidemiologic Study

        By Warren Taylor Vaughan
        Never forget Excalibur.
        “‘i love myself.’ the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever.” ---- nayyirah waheed
        Avatar: Franz Marc, Liegender Hund im Schnee 1911 (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)

        Comment


        • #19


          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/333/


          USA weekly journal "public health reports" ,since 1887
          mentioned elsewhere at flutrackers, but I wanted the link in this thread:
          I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
          my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

          Comment


          • #20
            https://www.bmj.com/archive

            British medical journal , since 1840
            I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
            my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

            Comment

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