Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

    Aus den Meldedaten zweier US amerikanischer Städte, nämlich Milwaukee und New York City, haben Forscher mit verschiedenen Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnungen (Bayes’sches Modell) und Plausibilitätskontrollen folgende Kennzahlen ermittelt:

    Im Falle einer Infektion mit pandemischer H1N1 Influenza liegt :

    - die Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem Krankenhaus (stationär) behandelt werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 70

    - die Wahrscheinlichkeit, auf einer Intensivstation behandelt werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 400


    - die Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben bei etwa 1: 2000
    (Konfidenzintervall 1: 1000 bis 1: 4000)




    Credits to ironorehopper
    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=136002

    PLoS Med. The Severity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in the United States, from April to July 2009: A Bayesian Analysis
    ________________________________________
    The Severity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in the United States, from April to July 2009: A Bayesian Analysis (PLoS Medicine, abstract, edited)

    Marc Lipsitch and colleagues use complementary data from two US cities, Milwaukee and New York City, to assess the severity of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in the United States.

    Formal Correction: This article has been formally corrected to address the following errors.

    Anne M. Presanis 1, Daniela De Angelis 1,2, The New York City Swine Flu Investigation Team 3, ¶, Angela Hagy 4, Carrie Reed 5, Steven Riley 6, Ben S. Cooper 2, Lyn Finelli 5, Paul Biedrzycki 4, Marc Lipsitch 7*
    1 Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
    2 Statistics, Modelling and Bioinformatics Department, Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, London, United Kingdom
    4 Department of Health, City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America,
    5 Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America,
    6 Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China,
    7 Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Departments of Epidemiology and Immunology & Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America



    Abstract

    Background
    Accurate measures of the severity of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza (pH1N1) are needed to assess the likely impact of an anticipated resurgence in the autumn in the Northern Hemisphere. Severity has been difficult to measure because jurisdictions with large numbers of deaths and other severe outcomes have had too many cases to assess the total number with confidence. Also, detection of severe cases may be more likely, resulting in overestimation of the severity of an average case. We sought to estimate the probabilities that symptomatic infection would lead to hospitalization, ICU admission, and death by combining data from multiple sources.

    Methods and Findings
    We used complementary data from two US cities: Milwaukee attempted to identify cases of medically attended infection whether or not they required hospitalization, while New York City focused on the identification of hospitalizations, intensive care admission or mechanical ventilation (hereafter, ICU), and deaths. New York data were used to estimate numerators for ICU and death, and two sources of data—medically attended cases in Milwaukee or self-reported influenza-like illness (ILI) in New York—were used to estimate ratios of symptomatic cases to hospitalizations. Combining these data with estimates of the fraction detected for each level of severity, we estimated the proportion of symptomatic patients who died (symptomatic case-fatality ratio, sCFR), required ICU (sCIR), and required hospitalization (sCHR), overall and by age category. Evidence, prior information, and associated uncertainty were analyzed in a Bayesian evidence synthesis framework. Using medically attended cases and estimates of the proportion of symptomatic cases medically attended, we estimated an sCFR of 0.048% (95% credible interval [CI] 0.026%–0.096%), sCIR of 0.239% (0.134%–0.458%), and sCHR of 1.44% (0.83%–2.64%). Using self-reported ILI, we obtained estimates approximately 7–9× lower. sCFR and sCIR appear to be highest in persons aged 18 y and older, and lowest in children aged 5–17 y. sCHR appears to be lowest in persons aged 5–17; our data were too sparse to allow us to determine the group in which it was the highest.

    Conclusions
    These estimates suggest that an autumn–winter pandemic wave of pH1N1 with comparable severity per case could lead to a number of deaths in the range from considerably below that associated with seasonal influenza to slightly higher, but with the greatest impact in children aged 0–4 and adults 18–64. These estimates of impact depend on assumptions about total incidence of infection and would be larger if incidence of symptomatic infection were higher or shifted toward adults, if viral virulence increased, or if suboptimal treatment resulted from stress on the health care system; numbers would decrease if the total proportion of the population symptomatically infected were lower than assumed.


    Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
    Citation: Presanis AM, De Angelis D, The New York City Swine Flu Investigation Team3, ¶, Hagy A, Reed C, et al. (2009) The Severity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in the United States, from April to July 2009: A Bayesian Analysis. PLoS Med 6(12): e1000207.
    doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000207

    Academic Editor: Lone Simonsen, George Washington University, United States of America
    Received: September 17, 2009; Accepted: November 19, 2009; Published: December 8, 2009

    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Public Domain declaration which stipulates that, once placed in the public domain, this work may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose.

    Funding: AMP and DDA were funded by the UK Medical Research Council (grants G0600675 and U.1052.00.007). DDA was funded also by the UK Health Protection Agency. ML and SR were supported by Cooperative Agreements 1U54GM088558 and 5U01GM076497 of the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study program of the US National Institutes of Health (US NIH). SR also received funding from grant 3R01TW008246-01S1 from the US NIH from the RAPIDD program of the Fogarty International Center of the US NIH and the Science and Technology Directorate of the US Department of Homeland Security. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

    Competing interests: ML has received consulting fees from the Avian/Pandemic Flu Registry (Outcome Sciences), sponsored in part by Roche.

    Abbreviations: BRFSS, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey; CDC, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CFR, case-fatality ratio; CHR, case-hospitalization ratio; CIR, case-intensive care ratio; CI, credible interval; DOHMH, [New York] Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; ICU, intensive care unit; ILI, influenza-like illness; pH1N1, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 [virus/influenza]; RDD, random-digit dialing; RT-PCR, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; sCFR, symptomatic case-fatality ratio; sCHR, symptomatic case-hospitalization ratio; sCIR, symptomatic case-ICU admission ratio

    * E-mail: mlipsitc@hsph.harvard.edu
    ¶ Membership of The New York City Swine Flu Investigation Team is provided in the Acknowledgments.


    [Source Full Free PDF Document: LINK. EDITED.]
    -
    PLoS Medicine: The Severity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in the United States, from April to July 2009: A Bayesian Analysis

    http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/...ew+Articles%29

    Editors' Summary

    Background
    Every winter, millions of people catch influenza—a viral infection of the airways—and about half a million people die as a result. In the US alone, an average of 36,000 people are thought to die from influenza-related causes every year. These seasonal epidemics occur because small but frequent changes in the virus mean that an immune response produced one year provides only partial protection against influenza the next year. Occasionally, influenza viruses emerge that are very different and to which human populations have virtually no immunity. These viruses can start global epidemics (pandemics) that kill millions of people. Experts have been warning for some time that an influenza pandemic is long overdue and in, March 2009, the first cases of influenza caused by a new virus called pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pH1N1; swine flu) occurred in Mexico. The virus spread rapidly and on 11 June 2009, the World Health Organization declared that a global pandemic of pH1N1 influenza was underway. By the beginning of November 2009, more than 6,000 people had died from pH1N1 influenza.

    Why Was This Study Done?
    With the onset of autumn—drier weather and the return of children to school help the influenza virus to spread—pH1N1 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in the Northern Hemisphere have greatly increased. Although public-health officials have been preparing for this resurgence of infection, they cannot be sure of its impact on human health without knowing more about the severity of pH1N1 infections. The severity of an infection can be expressed as a case-fatality ratio (CFR; the proportion of cases that result in death), as a case-hospitalization ratio (CHR; the proportion of cases that result in hospitalization), and as a case-intensive care ratio (CIR; the proportion of cases that require treatment in an intensive care unit). Because so many people have been infected with pH1N1 since it emerged, the numbers of cases and deaths caused by pH1N1 infection are not known accurately so these ratios cannot be easily calculated. In this study, the researchers estimate the severity of pH1N1 influenza in the US between April and July 2009 by combining data on pH1N1 infections from several sources using a statistical approach known as Bayesian evidence synthesis.

    What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
    By using data on medically attended and hospitalized cases of pH1N1 infection in Milwaukee and information from New York City on hospitalizations, intensive care use, and deaths, the researchers estimate that the proportion of US cases with symptoms that died (the sCFR) during summer 2009 was 0.048%. That is, about 1 in 2,000 people who had symptoms of pH1N1 infection died. The “credible interval” for this sCFR, the range of values between which the “true” sCFR is likely to lie, they report, is 0.026%–0.096% (between 1 in 4,000 and 1 in 1,000 deaths for every symptomatic case). About 1 in 400 symptomatic cases required treatment in intensive care, they estimate, and about 1 in 70 symptomatic cases required hospital admission. When the researchers used a different approach to estimate the total number of symptomatic cases—based on New Yorkers' self-reported incidence of influenza-like-illness from a telephone survey—their estimates of pH1N1 infection severity were 7- to 9-fold lower. Finally, they report that the sCFR and the sCIR were highest in people aged 18 or older and lowest in children aged 5–17 years.

    What Do These Findings Mean?
    Many uncertainties (for example, imperfect detection and reporting) can affect estimates of influenza severity. Even so, the findings of this study suggest that an autumn–winter pandemic wave of pH1N1 will have a death toll only slightly higher than or considerably lower than that caused by seasonal influenza in an average year, provided pH1N1 continues to behave as it did during the summer. Similarly, the estimated burden on hospitals and intensive care facilities ranges from somewhat higher than in a normal influenza season to considerably lower. The findings of this study also suggest that, unlike seasonal influenza, which kills mainly elderly adults, a high proportion of deaths from pH1N1infection will occur in nonelderly adults, a shift in age distribution that has been seen in previous pandemics. With these estimates in hand and with continued close monitoring of the pandemic, public-health officials should now be in a better position to plan effective strategies to deal with the pH1N1 pandemic.

    Additional Information
    Please access these Web sites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000207 .
    • The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides information about influenza for patients and professionals, including specific information on pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza
    • Flu.gov, a US government Web site, provides access to information on H1N1, avian and pandemic influenza
    • The World Health Organization provides information on seasonal influenza and has detailed information on pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza (in several languages)
    • The UK Health Protection Agency provides information on pandemic influenza and on pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza
    • More information for patients about H1N1 influenza is available through Choices, an information resource provided by the UK National Health Service

  • #2
    Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

    http://tagesschau.sf.tv/content/view/full/2564614

    tagesschau.sf Schweiz:

    Schweinegrippe-Welle harmloser als angenommen?

    Dienstag, 8. Dezember 2009, 19:23 Uhr

    In den USA verläuft die Schweinegrippe-Welle milder als erwartet. Epidemiologen gehen davon aus, dass die Zahl der Todesopfer durch das Virus wesentlich unter den Vorhersagen bleibt – und weit unter der Opferzahl vorangegangener Grippewellen.

    Trotz dem milden Verlauf der Schweinegrippe-Welle sind die Spitäler in den USA auf alles gefasst.

    «Ich denke, dies ist die mildeste Pandemie, die wir je hatten», sagt der Experte für ansteckende Krankheiten, Marc Lipsitch, vom Harvard-Institut für Öffentliche Gesundheit in Boston. Die Fachleute warnen aber, dass die Schweinegrippe trotz der Abschwächung der Vorhersagen weiterhin gefährlich und ihr Verlauf unvorhersehbar sei.

    Prognose nach unten korrigiert
    Nach Datensammlungen in New York und Milwaukee gehen die Forscher in der am Montagabend veröffentlichten Analyse von 6000 bis höchstens 45'000 Grippetoten durch das Schweinegrippe-Virus bis zum Ende des Winters aus.

    Bei einer Grippewelle in den Jahren 1967/68 starben in den USA 34'000 Menschen, zehn Jahre davor gab es 70'000 Tote. Bei der gegenwärtigen Welle der H1N1-Grippe hatten Mitarbeiter der US-Gesundheitsbehörden ursprünglich bis zu 90'000 Grippetote prognostiziert.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

      > Im Falle einer Infektion mit pandemischer H1N1 Influenza liegt :
      >- die Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem Krankenhaus (stationär)
      > behandelt werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 70
      >- die Wahrscheinlichkeit, auf einer Intensivstation behandelt
      > werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 400
      > - die Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben bei etwa 1: 2000
      > (Konfidenzintervall 1: 1000 bis 1: 4000)

      ne,ne.
      das ist nur für die Fälle die einen Arzt aufsuchen oder "emergency room"
      1M infiziert in New York City, 50 gestorben. --> CFR=0.005% = 1:20000

      warum gibt es keine gescheiten Zusammenfassungen zu solchen Artikeln,
      sodass solche Misverständnisse nicht vorkommen ?
      Oder ist das sogar gewollt ?
      Wer will schon lange Artikel lesen.


      Frankreich: 2-3M infiziert (symptomatisch), 150 tot --> 1:17000
      USA(Prognose): 45M infiziert, 12500 tot --> 1:3600


      http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/...l.pmed.1000207

      > we estimated an sCFR of 0.048%... Using self-reported ILI, we obtained estimates
      > approximately 7–9× lower

      so CFR=0.006% = 1:16666 .



      > New York data were used to estimate numerators for ICU and death,
      > ... self-reported influenza-like illness (ILI) in New York—were used to estimate ratios
      > of symptomatic cases to hospitalizations


      > ... we estimated the proportion of symptomatic patients who died
      > (symptomatic case-fatality ratio, sCFR)
      > Using medically attended cases and estimates of the proportion of
      > symptomatic cases medically attended, we estimated an sCFR of 0.048%

      also was nun ?

      sCFR = symptomatic case-fatility ratio
      or
      sCFR = medically attended case fatality ratio ?


      unnötig lang und irreführend und kompliziert.
      Oder : wie man einfache Sachverhalte verkompiziert und aufbauscht, sodass
      sie sich fuer einen Zeitschrift-Artikel eignen.
      I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
      my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

        http://www.eurosurveillance.org/View...rticleId=19255
        CFR= 0.0004% to 0.06% geometrical mean ~ 0.005

        http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/15/12/pdfs/09-1413.pdf
        earlier estimate USA, April-July:
        3M symptomatic cases
        14K hospitalizations
        800 deaths
        CFR=0.027%

        http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=132899
        April 2009 bis 17. Oktober 2009
        14 Mio. bis 34 Mio. mit H1N1 Influenza infiziert worden
        63.000 bis 153.000 hospitalisiert worden und
        2.500 bis 6.000 verstorben.
        CFR=0.018% , 1:5600 - das scheint mir der vernünftigste Ansatz
        I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
        my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

          > the researchers estimate that the proportion of US cases with symptoms
          > that died (the sCFR) during summer 2009 was 0.048%.
          > That is, about 1 in 2,000 people who had symptoms of pH1N1 infection died

          assuming that everyone who had symptoms did report at a doctor ? That would be a
          strange definition of "symptoms". The authors - apparantly deliberately - keep this unclear
          in the abstract.



          > it is impossible to estimate these quantities (CFR) directly,

          others have done the "impossible"
          Here is mine: CFR=0.013% in USA. (titers > 4fold)
          it's just a subjective estimate ,
          please give yours !
          that would be more useful than the whole paper, IMO

          > 7.5% had symptomatic pH1N1 infection in NZ

          Australian vaccine studies suggest that this was an underestimate

          > No large jurisdiction in the world has been able to maintain an accurate count
          > of total pH1N1 cases once the epidemic grew beyond hundreds of cases

          "accurate count" ? Accurate enough to estimate the CFR within +-20%
          for a 90% confidence interval. Just ask the people and control with serological
          studies. This is done now for 2000 people in the UK.
          I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
          my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

            OK, I told you my thoughts when starting to read the paper, first hoping that I
            hadn't to read the whole paper.
            One number (CFR) would have been enough, but they won't give it, so we must try
            to estimate what they would estimate that number is.

            apparantly they not just took medically attended case but tried to estimate
            "symptomatic" people

            > these surveys estimated that between 42% and 58% of symptomatic ILI patients
            > sought medical attention [19].

            what's the threshold for symptomatically ? We had high symptoms , low symptoms,
            asymptomatic. And it's reasonable to assume that symptom-severety is continuous and doesn't
            change abruptly in the borders of these 3 groups.

            ....

            {discussion}
            seems that they really believe, that 0.048% of symptomatic people died.
            (so excuse my "ne,ne" in the first post)
            So either ~500 died in New York or they assume much fewer than 1M
            symptomatic infections ? (I din't yet find which of these two)

            > In the 1957 and 1968 pandemics, it appears that perhaps 40%–60% of the population
            > was serologically infected, and that of those, 40%–60% were symptomatic

            > Approach 2 suggests much smaller figures

            now I'm confused again. Which approach is better, what's their estimate ?

            > attack rate much smaller than 25%
            > In NZ 2% consulted a GP for ILI

            > In populations without widespread access to intensive care, ...the same burden of disease
            > could {is estimated to} lead to a death rate 4–5× higher {than USA}

            > Under Approach 1, and assuming a typical pandemic symptomatic attack rate of 25%,

            Approach 1 is mentioned more often than approach 2, I get the feeling they favour 1 over 2

            so, assuming 2/3 of approach 1 an 1/3 of approach 2, I get a geometrical mean of
            sCFR=0.024% which is my estimate of their estimate.


            it seems to be much lower (~factor 2) in Australia,Western Europe.
            I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
            my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

              Originally posted by gsgs View Post
              > Im Falle einer Infektion mit pandemischer H1N1 Influenza liegt :
              >- die Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem Krankenhaus (stationär)
              > behandelt werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 70
              >- die Wahrscheinlichkeit, auf einer Intensivstation behandelt
              > werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 400
              > - die Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben bei etwa 1: 2000
              > (Konfidenzintervall 1: 1000 bis 1: 4000)

              ne,ne.
              das ist nur für die Fälle die einen Arzt aufsuchen oder "emergency room"
              1M infiziert in New York City, 50 gestorben. --> CFR=0.005% = 1:20000


              warum gibt es keine gescheiten Zusammenfassungen zu solchen Artikeln,
              sodass solche Misverständnisse nicht vorkommen ?
              Oder ist das sogar gewollt ?
              Wer will schon lange Artikel lesen.
              (...)
              Originally posted by gsgs View Post
              (...)
              http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=132899
              April 2009 bis 17. Oktober 2009
              14 Mio. bis 34 Mio. mit H1N1 Influenza infiziert worden
              63.000 bis 153.000 hospitalisiert worden und
              2.500 bis 6.000 verstorben.
              CFR=0.018% , 1:5600 - das scheint mir der vernünftigste Ansatz
              Aha, ich sehe, wir kommen der Sache schon näher:

              Wir können nicht sicher voraussagen, welcher Anteil der Bevölkerung in einem bestimmten Zeitraum infiziert wird (clinical attack rate; z.B. während einer bestimmten „pandemischen Welle“). Ein ganz wesentlicher Faktor für die Ausbreitungswahrscheinlichkeit und –geschwindigkeit während einer definierten Zeitspanne sind jedoch die klimatischen Bedingungen („Grippesaison“) mit deutlich erhöhter Ausbreitungswahrscheinlichkeit unter kalten und trockenen Witterungsverhältnissen (Winter auf der Nordhalbkugel). Wir wissen, dass der Verlauf der pandemischen Welle durch die Aufklärung der Bevölkerung und allgemeine Vorsichtsmaßnahmen sowie gezielte Maßnahmen des öffentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes deutlich modifiziert wird (z.B. Schulschliessungen, Quarantäne, Postexpositionsprophylaxe usw.). Wir wissen, dass die Altersstruktur der Bevölkerung eine große Rolle spielt, weil Kinder und Jugendliche die Infektion in deutlich stärkerem Maße verbreiten als Erwachsene. Wir wissen, dass die Wahrscheinlichkeit für die Ausbreitung der Infektion nicht nur von sozialen Lebensumständen abhängt (Urlaubsrückreisende, Schule, Kindergarten, Ferienzeit, Familienstrukturen usw.) sondern auch unter immunologischen Aspekten differieren kann (vorbestehende altersabhängige Teilimmunität), insbesondere wenn es gelingt, durch eine Impfkampagne einen erheblichen Teil der Bevölkerung zu schützen und gleichzeitig von der Infektionskette auszuschliessen.


              Wir wissen aus verschiedenen Ländern (z.B. Südhalbkugel, Australien), dass etwa 15 bis 20 % der hospitalisierten Patienten intensivmedizinisch betreut werden müssen (Verhältnis 1: 5 bis 1: 6) und wir wissen dass etwa 20 % (bis 30 %) der intensivmedizinisch behandelten Patienten versterben (Verhältnis 1: 5).

              Nach den modifizierten Schätzungen der CDC (link siehe unten) lag in den USA im Falle einer Infektion mit H1N1 die Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem Krankenhaus (stationär) behandelt werden zu müssen bei etwa 1: 222 und die Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben bei etwa 1: 5.618. Folgt man der oben genannten 1: 5 Relation (Intensivstation : Hospitalisation bzw. Tod : Intensivstation), so läge die Wahrscheinlichkeit auf einer Intensivstation behandelt werden zu müssen für die CDC-Daten bei etwa 1: 1.110

              Stellen wir nun diese Daten einmal gegenüber:

              Wahrscheinlichkeit in einem Krankenhaus (stationär) behandelt werden zu müssen (hospitalization):

              PLOS Med. Lipsitch et al.: 1: 70
              CDC-estimates: 1: 222

              Wahrscheinlichkeit, auf einer Intensivstation behandelt werden zu müssen (ICU):
              PLOS Med. Lipsitch et al.: 1: 400
              CDC-estimates: 1: 1 110


              Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben (death):
              PLOS Med. Lipsitch et al.: 1: 2 000 (Konfidenzintervall 1: 1000 bis 1: 4000)
              CDC-estimates: 1 : 5 618

              Mein Fazit:

              Damit unterscheiden sich diese Daten noch immer um den Faktor 3, aber nach den extremen Unterschieden, die wir bisher gewohnt waren, liegen sie doch erstaunlich eng beisammen. Eine große Unsicherheit geht aber von den Unterschieden in den jeweiligen nationalen Meldesystemen aus. Diese Faktoren bestimmen dann das Ausmaß der jeweiligen „Dunkelziffer“. Für mich fügen sich diese Daten aber zu einem immer deutlicheren Bild zusammen.




              Quellen:

              http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/estimates_2009_h1n1.htm
              CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in the United States, April – October 17, 2009
              November 12, 2009, 1:00 PM ET
              CDC Estimates of 2009 H1N1 Cases and Related Hospitalizations and Deaths from April-October 17, 2009 [edited]

              2009 H1N1 Mid-Level Range* Estimated Range *

              Cases
              Cases Total ~22 million ~14 million to ~34 million

              Hospitalizations
              Hospitalizations Total ~98,000 ~63,000 to ~153,000

              Deaths
              Deaths Total ~3,900 ~2,500 to ~6,100



              Eurosurveillance, Volume 14, Issue 42, 22 October 2009:
              Surveillance and outbreak reports: PROGRESSION AND IMPACT OF THE FIRST WINTER WAVE OF THE 2009 PANDEMIC H1N1 INFLUENZA IN NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA
              Cretikos MA1,2, Muscatello DJ1,3, Patterson J1, Conaty S4, Churches T1, Fizzell J1, Chant KG1, McAnulty JM1, Thackway S1

              http://www.eurosurveillance.org/View...rticleId=19365
              Abstract:
              A range of surveillance systems were used to assess the progression and impact of the first wave of pandemic H1N1 influenza in New South Wales, Australia during the southern hemisphere winter. Surveillance methods included laboratory notifications, near real-time emergency department syndromic surveillance, ambulance despatch surveillance, death certificate surveillance and purpose-built web-based data systems to capture influenza clinic and intensive care unit activity. The epidemic lasted 10 weeks. By 31 August 2009, 1,214 people with pandemic H1N1 influenza infection were hospitalised (17.2 per 100,000 population), 225 were admitted to intensive care (3.2 per 100,000), and 48 died (0.7 per 100,000). Children aged 0-4 years had the highest hospitalisation rates, while adults aged 50-54 had the highest rates of intensive care admission. During the epidemic period, overall presentations to emergency departments were 6% higher than in 2008, while presentations for influenza-like illness were 736% higher. At the peak, confirmed cases of pandemic H1N1 influenza consumed 15% of intensive care capacity. Excess mortality from influenza and pneumonia was lower than in recent influenza seasons. Health services, particularly emergency departments and intensive care units, were substantially affected by the epidemic. Mortality from influenza was comparable with previous seasons.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                dein "Lipsitch" ist "Lipsitch Approach 1"

                Approach 2 hat ca. 8 mal weniger Tote.

                Also Faktor 3 für die Mitte


                Ich nahm Faktor 2 , da es den Anschein hatte dass
                Approach 1 eher befürwortet wurde.


                Oder misverstehe ich das mit den Aproaches (noch immer) ?


                wie em auch sei, wir scheinen uns auf sCFR~0.02%
                einzupeneln, mit den entsprechenden Fatoren für für
                Hospitalisierungen, ICU-Einlieferungen, Arztbesuche,
                symptomitischn Fällen die sich daraus errechnen.
                Diese Faktoren scheinen einigermassen gesichert zu sein
                und ähnlich weltweit
                I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                  > Ein ganz wesentlicher Faktor für die Ausbreitungswahrscheinlichkeit und –geschwindigkeit
                  > während einer definierten Zeitspanne sind jedoch die klimatischen Bedingungen
                  > („Grippesaison“) mit deutlich erhöhter Ausbreitungswahrscheinlichkeit unter kalten und
                  > trockenen Witterungsverhältnissen (Winter auf der Nordhalbkugel)

                  Saisonmässig - natürlich. Aber tägliche oder wöchentliche Schwankungen scheinen
                  kaum eine Rolle zu spielen.

                  > Wir wissen, dass der Verlauf der pandemischen Welle durch die Aufklärung der Bevölkerung
                  > und allgemeine Vorsichtsmaßnahmen sowie gezielte Maßnahmen des öffentlichen
                  > Gesundheitsdienstes deutlich modifiziert wird (z.B. Schulschliessungen,
                  > Quarantäne, Postexpositionsprophylaxe usw.).

                  "deutlich" ist meist nur eine Verzögerung. Den Effekt von Schulschliessungen hat man
                  auf 20% geschätzt. Wir sehen fast immer die typische Wellenform, ob mit oder
                  ohne Gegenmassnahmen. Die Höhe und Länge des Wellenberges kann etwas (~50% ?)
                  verändert werden, aber die Welle bleibt.
                  I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                  my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                    also etwa 3 mal so viele Tote wie berichtet ? Was meinst du ?

                    --> 250 in Deutschland bisher

                    immer noch lächerlich wenig im Vergleich zu den Grippetoten
                    einer normalen Saison.
                    Auch wenn jene im Durchschnitt 80 Jahre alt sind, diese nur 50.

                    Da sollten wir mexgripp dankbar sein wenn es H3N2 verdrängt.

                    Die Fall-Zahlen sollten im Laufe der Jahre runter gehen
                    mit steigender Immunität und die Altersstruktur rauf.
                    So wie 1977ff
                    I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                    my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                      gsgs,

                      ja, ich stimme in allem zu. Lipsitch approach 1 ist relativ hoch. Die CDC-Schätzungen kommen der Wahrheit wohl am nächsten.

                      Aber uns steht in Deutschland die erste H1N1-Wintersaison ja erst noch bevor (egal, ob man das "zweite" oder "dritte" Welle nennen will), so dass ich in der Zeit zwischen dem Jahreswechsel und etwa März 2010 mit einem neuen Anstieg rechne.

                      Die CDC hat ja ihre ersten Meldedaten aus Plausibilitätsgründen auch nach oben korrigiert und die veröffentlichten Schätzungen für die Todesfälle infolge saisonaler Grippe sind reine statistische Kalkulationen der "Übersterblichkeit".

                      Seriöse Analysen sind wohl nicht vor dem Sommer 2010 zu erwarten. Ich wundere mich, dass das RKI mit seiner PIKS-Surveillance jetzt (!) so einen Aufwand betreibt ("großer Datenhunger" !). Wozu, wenn das alles so "mild" ist ?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                        glaubst du, die wissen mehr als wir ?

                        von einer 2.,3. Welle diesen Winter bin ich nicht überzeugt.
                        (etwa 40%)

                        ist nicht passiert auf der Südhalbkugel und da war 2003/4
                        mit fast nix in Deutschland.
                        Aber, je weniger wir jetzt haben, je mehr haben wir
                        wahrscheinlich nächste Saison
                        I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                        my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                          Die Zahlen werden klarer:

                          Neue Zahlen von der CDC und aus UK im BMJ veröffentlicht:


                          http://cdc.gov/h1n1flu/pdf/december10.pdf

                          http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/339/dec10_1/b5213.pdf
                          BMJ:Mortality frompandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza in England: public health surveillance study


                          Wahrscheinlichkeit, im Falle einer Infektion mit pandemischer Influenza H1N1 in einem Krankenhaus (stationär) behandelt werden zu müssen (hospitalization):
                          CDC-estimates (bis 14.Nov): 1: 221

                          Wahrscheinlichkeit, auf einer Intensivstation behandelt werden zu müssen (ICU):
                          CDC (meine eigene Schätzung Relation ca. 1: 5): ~ 1: 1 000

                          Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben (death):
                          CDC-estimates (bis 14.Nov): : 1 : 4 786
                          UK (BMJ, bis 8. Nov): 1: 3 846

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                            ... _symptomatischen_ Infektion

                            was exakt dann symptomatisch ist, ist wiederum unklar


                            nur 1% infiziert in UK trotz 2 Wellen ?

                            aber 16% in USA, sagt CDC

                            1% CFR in den >65J in England ist auch schwer zu glauben
                            0.032% in USA laut CDC, 30 mal weniger


                            Das wird man vergleichen mit Zahlen aus anderen Europäischen Ländern, die jetzt reinkommen...
                            I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                            my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: PLOS Medicine: Ausmaß und Schwere der H1N1 Influenza-Pandemie in den USA zwischen April und Juli 2009

                              Originally posted by gsgs View Post
                              ... _symptomatischen_ Infektion

                              was exakt dann symptomatisch ist, ist wiederum unklar


                              nur 1% infiziert in UK trotz 2 Wellen ?

                              aber 16% in USA, sagt CDC


                              1% CFR in den >65J in England ist auch schwer zu glauben
                              0.032% in USA laut CDC, 30 mal weniger


                              Das wird man vergleichen mit Zahlen aus anderen Europäischen Ländern, die jetzt reinkommen...

                              gsgs,

                              ja, auf den Punkt gebracht ! (Es ist schon erstaunlich, mit wie wenig Selbstkritik offizielle Organe der nationalen Gesundheitsbehörden so offenkundig diskrepante Daten veröffentlichen).

                              Ich halte aber die CDC-Kalkulationen nach Einführung der "neuen Methode" des Plausibilitätsabgleichs doch für einigermaßen verlässlich. Immerhin hat dieser Ansatz dazu geführt, dass die Zahl der Todesfälle gegenüber der vorhergehenden "offiziellen H1N1-Todesfall-Zählung" in den USA etwa um den Faktor 3 erhöht wurde. Und die 16 % "attack rate" nach den zwei ersten USA-Wellen (Sommer / Herbst) in einer immunologisch weitgehend ungeschützten Bevölkerung entspricht wenigstens im Ansatz den epidemiologischen Voraussagen.

                              Die "1 %" UK aus dem BMJ (540 000 von ca. 50 Mio Engländern) ist wirklich lächerlich und nimmt ja nur "offiziell bestätigte Fälle" in die Kalkulation.

                              Die Dunkelziffer in der Abstrich-Diagnostik ist einfach sehr hoch (meines Erachtens irgendwo zwischen 6 x und 10 x).

                              Allerdings stimmte unter Berücksichtigung dieses "underreporting" dann die Relation "Todesfälle zu Infizierten" in UK nicht mehr. Also ist bei den Todesfällen gegenüber dem offiziellen UK-case-count auch eine Dunkelziffer anzunehmen, vermutlich ähnlich wie in den USA etwa Faktor 3 x.

                              Damit wäre die CFR in UK derzeit in Wirklichkeit wohl etwas niedriger als momentan kalkuliert. Aber UK hinkt ja auch etwas hinter USA zurück (Zeitpunkt der Datenerhebung, Zeitpunkt auf der Infektionswelle, Plausibilitäts-Erkenntnis). ...

                              Trotz allem, die Relation "Todesfälle zu Infizierten" scheint sich irgendwo zwischen 1: 4 000 und 1: 6 000 einzupendeln.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X