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  • New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

    News | 3 June, 2008

    By Alistair Driver
    A SUSPECTED new case of avian flu is being investigated at a farm in Oxfordshire.

    It is understood that the strain of disease thought to have been found in laying hens at a farm near Banbury is H7, not the deadly H5N1 version that has been found twice in England in the past 12 months.

    More information when we get it.

    http://www.farmersguardian.com/story...code=19006&c=1

  • #2
    Re: New case of bird flu suspected in Oxfordshire

    Bird flu rumours in Banbury

    THE Banbury Guardian is currently (5.30pm, Tuesday) investigating reports of an outbreak of bird flu in the Banbury area.
    Early details suggest 25,000 birds face slaughter following an outbreak of the H7 strain of bird flu at a site ten kilometres from the town.

    A spokesman for the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs would not confirm the report but said: "We have investigations ongoing throughout the year as a matter of routine."

    The H7 family of flu viruses primarily affects birds. A deadly version of the H7N7 strain hit poultry in the Netherlands in 2003 and a less severe form, H7N2, broke out in the UK last year.

    http://www.banburyguardian.co.uk/new...ury.4147225.jp

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New case of bird flu suspected in Oxfordshire

      Source: http://news.sky.com/skynews/article/...317966,00.html
      Chickens Test Positive For Bird Flu

      Updated:18:04, Tuesday June 03, 2008
      Chickens on a farm in Oxfordshire have tested positive for the H7 strain of bird flu, according to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New case of bird flu suspected in Oxfordshire

        Bird flu in Banbury

        DEFRA has this evening (Tuesday) confirmed an outbreak of Bird Flu in the Banbury area.
        Chief veterinary officer, Nigel Gibbens, has confirmed Avian Influenza in chickens on premises near Banbury after preliminary tests were positive for the H7 strain.

        All birds on the premises will be slaughtered as a precautionary measure.

        Early reports suggest 25,000 birds will be slaughtered on the unnamed premises ten kilometres from Banbury.

        Laboratory testing continues and results which will allow confirmation of whether the strain is high or low pathogenicity will follow.

        A detailed epidemiological investigation to better understand the origin and development of the disease is underway.

        A Temporary Control Zone with a three-kilometre inner zone and a ten-kilometre outer zone is being established around the infected premises.

        A number of measures apply.

        - All birds must be housed or otherwise isolated from contact with wild birds in the inner zone.

        - Bird gatherings are banned and all other movements of birds and some products are banned in the whole of the Temporary Control Zone.

        Defra is urgently considering whether any wider measures may be needed.

        Mr Gibbens said: "I would stress the need for poultry keepers to be extremely vigilant, practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local Animal Health Office immediately."

        The Health Protection Agency has advised that it is important to remember that H7 avian flu remains largely a disease of birds. The virus does not transmit easily to humans, as evidenced by the small number of confirmed infections worldwide to date.

        Almost all human H7 infections documented so far have been associated with close contact with dead or dying poultry.

        The risk to human health posed by H7 avian influenza viruses remains low.

        Nonetheless, the local Health Protection Unit will be identifying and following up those who may have had contact with the infected poultry and provide guidance and advice, and preventative medication as appropriate.

        Dr Judith Hilton, Food Standards Agency head of microbiological safety, said:"This case of bird flu on a premises in Banbury, Oxfordshire poses no safety implications for the human food chain.
        "Properly cooked poultry and poultry products, including eggs, are safe to eat. The science shows that the virus isn't contracted by eating food – but usually by close contact with infected birds."

        All poultry keepers on the GB Poultry Register are being notified, and the EU Commission has been informed.

        http://www.banburyguardian.co.uk/new...ury.4147225.jp

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New case of bird flu suspected in Oxfordshire

          Avian Influenza H7 confirmed in Oxfordshire<!-- InstanceEndEditable --><!--End of title--><!--Central Content Area text--><!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="body" -->
          The Chief Veterinary Officer, Nigel Gibbens, has today confirmed Avian Influenza in chickens on premises near Banbury in Oxfordshire after preliminary tests were positive for the H7 strain. All birds on the premises will be slaughtered as a precautionary measure.
          Laboratory testing continues and results which will allow confirmation of whether the strain is high or low pathogenicity will follow. A detailed epidemiological investigation to better understand the origin and development of the disease is underway.
          A Temporary Control Zone with a 3km inner zone and a 10km outer zone is being established around the Infected Premises. A number of measures apply. All birds must be housed or otherwise isolated from contact with wild birds in the inner zone. Bird gatherings are banned and all other movements of birds and some products are banned in the whole of the Temporary Control Zone. Defra is urgently considering whether any wider measures may be needed.
          Poultry keepers are urged to be extremely vigilant, practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local Animal Health Office immediately.
          The Health Protection Agency has advised that it is important to remember that H7 avian flu remains largely a disease of birds. The virus does not transmit easily to humans, as evidenced by the small number of confirmed infections worldwide to date. Almost all human H7 infections documented so far have been associated with close contact with dead or dying poultry. The risk to human health posed by H7 avian influenza viruses remains low. Nonetheless, the local Health Protection Unit will be identifying and following up those who may have had contact with the infected poultry and provide guidance and advice, and preventative medication as appropriate.
          Dr Judith Hilton, Food Standards Agency head of microbiological safety, said:
          “This case of bird flu on a premises in Banbury, Oxfordshire poses no safety implications for the human food chain. Properly cooked poultry and poultry products, including eggs, are safe to eat. The science shows that the virus isn't contracted by eating food – but usually by close contact with infected birds.”
          All poultry keepers on the GB Poultry Register are being notified, and the EU Commission has been informed.
          Further information:
          <!-- InstanceEndEditable --><!--End of Central Content editable text area --><!--Date Modified and Published--><!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="PubDate" -->Page last modified: 3 June 2008 18:25
          Page published: 3 June 2008<!-- InstanceEndEditable -->

          http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/latest/...nimal-0603.htm<!--End Date-->
          <!--Footer-->

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

            you know something when one news source get a new story then they all report on it is basically the same story they just edit it.

            By the way I get all of my information through here:
            http://www.newsnow.co.uk/h/Hot+Topics/Bird+Flu

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

              Originally posted by rymich13 View Post
              you know something when one news source get a new story then they all report on it is basically the same story they just edit it.

              By the way I get all of my information through here:
              http://www.newsnow.co.uk/h/Hot+Topics/Bird+Flu
              The H7 outbreaks are like clockwork. Same problem almost exactly one year ago

              http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05...icient_11.html

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                Chickens test positive for bird flu

                Jun 3 2008
                Chickens on a farm in Oxfordshire have tested positive for the H7 strain of bird flu, according to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.
                All birds on the infected farm near Banbury will be slaughtered as a precautionary measure after the case of avian flu was confirmed by new chief veterinary officer Nigel Gibbens.
                Testing is continuing to discover whether the strain of bird flu is a highly pathogenic one, Defra said.
                Shadow environment secretary Peter Ainsworth said: "This is worrying news for the farming community. It is vital that Defra acts to contain the outbreak and to identify its source."

                http://www.southportvisiter.co.uk/so...1022-21018705/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                  Originally posted by niman View Post
                  The H7 outbreaks are like clockwork. Same problem almost exactly one year ago

                  http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05...icient_11.html
                  H7N3 almost exactly 2 years ago

                  http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04...ch_Spread.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                    well, if this follows the same pattern as last year then we should be seeing some human cases here shortly as well.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                      Source: http://www.pr-inside.com/uk-governme...in-r622988.htm

                      UK government: chickens on farm in southern England have H7 subtype of bird flu

                      © AP
                      2008-06-03 20:19:25 -

                      LONDON (AP) - The British government says it has detected the presence of the H7 subtype of bird flu among chickens at a farm near Banbury. The town is about 80 miles (130 kilometers) northwest of London.
                      The government said Tuesday it is too soon to know whether the virus is a particularly lethal strain.
                      The H7 subtype of bird flu has previously hit birds in Britain and elsewhere.
                      It has also occasionally infected humans although it generally causes milder illness than the H5N1 subtype. A large outbreak in the Netherlands in 2003 caused one death.
                      Last year at least four Britons were infected with H7N2 when the strain broke out in Wales.


                      Health experts monitor bird flu strains including H7 very closely since they have the potential to spark a flu pandemic.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                        Commentary at

                        http://www.recombinomics.com/News/06...and_Again.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                          Source: http://www.oxfordmail.net/display.va...d_flu_farm.php

                          Vets slaughter chickens on bird flu farm
                          By Ellie Simmonds

                          Vets have been ordered to slaughter 25,000 chickens after an outbreak of bird flu was confirmed in Oxfordshire.

                          The outbreak - the first in the county - was discovered at Eastwood Farm between Shenington and Shutford, about 10 miles west of Banbury.

                          The farmer contacted the Department for Food and Rural Affairs yesterday after noticing his birds were showing suspicious symptoms.


                          Nigel Gibbens, the Government's chief veterinary officer, tonight confirmed the chickens had tested positive for the H7 strain of Avian Influenza - one of two strains which can be highly contagious - but not the deadly H5N1 strain.

                          He said the virus did not transmit easily to humans and almost all human H7 infections so far had been associated with close contact with dead or dying poultry.

                          A control zone has been put in place.


                          A neighbouring farmer, who did not wish to be named, said: "I am just terribly sad for the farmer. Luckily I don't have poultry here but I feel very sad - they are good people who work hard."

                          Another farmer added: "I am surprised, because there haven't been cases of bird flu for a while.

                          "These things are generally spread by wild birds, I presume that is what has happened here."

                          Police cordoned off part of Epwell Road, while Defra officials set up a temporary control area in which all birds must be kept inside.

                          The department is urgently considering whether any wider measures were needed.

                          Mr Gibbens said: "I would stress the need for poultry keepers to be extremely vigilant, practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local animal health office immediately."

                          Oxfordshire County Council's chief emergency planning officer John Kelly said the issue was being dealt with by the county's trading standards department.

                          He added: "It is not an emergency planning matter - I would certainly say to people they should not worry."

                          Linda Ayres, owner of Hangland Farm Ostriches in nearby Upper Wardington, said: "My birds are out to grass right now. We will certainly have to look at getting them in.

                          "Before there has certainly been nothing close enough to us to worry us. It will be the first time we have had it to worry about."

                          Dr Judith Hilton, head of microbiological safety for the Food Standards Agency, said: "This case of bird flu poses no safety implications for the human food chain."

                          8:56pm today

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                            Chickens confirmed with bird flu [BBC]

                            A control zone has been set up around the infected premises

                            Chickens on a farm in Oxfordshire have tested positive for bird flu, Chief Veterinary Officer Nigel Gibbens says.

                            All birds on the premises, near Banbury, are being slaughtered.

                            The birds have been confirmed with the H7 strain of the disease, rather than highly virulent H5N1 strain, regarded as a potential threat to human health.

                            Tests are being conducted to determine the virulence of the H7 strain and a temporary control zone is being set up around the farm.

                            Human risk 'low'
                            Mr Gibbens said: "I would stress the need for poultry keepers to be extremely vigilant, practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local animal health office immediately."

                            The control zone has a 3km (1.8-mile) inner zone and a 10km (6.2-mile) outer zone, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs says.

                            Within the inner zone, all kept birds must be isolated from contact with wild birds. Bird gatherings and movements are banned within the whole zone, as is the movement of some products.

                            All the birds on the farm, nearby Banbury, are being slaughtered

                            The Health Protection Agency said it would be following up those who might have been in contact with the infected birds to offer them guidance and preventative medication.

                            However, it stressed the risk to human health from H7 avian influenza was low and said it did not transmit easily to humans.

                            The Food Standards Agency said the outbreak "poses no safety implications for the human food chain".

                            Dr Judith Hilton, the FSA's head of microbiological safety, said: "Properly cooked poultry and poultry products are safe to eat.

                            "The science shows that the virus isn't contracted by eating food, but usually by close contact with infected birds."

                            There have been several outbreaks of bird flu in the UK.

                            The most recent, in January this year, saw the H5N1 strain confirmed in 11 wild birds near Chesil Beach in Dorset.

                            In 2006, a farm worker contracted the H7 strain after coming into close contact with infected birds in North Tuddenham, Norfolk.

                            -
                            http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7434400.stm
                            ------

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: New case of H7 bird flu in Oxfordshire

                              Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR
                              Out of hours telephone 020 7270 8960
                              <!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="Pre-title" --><!-- InstanceEndEditable -->

                              <!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="Title" -->Update on Avian Influenza in Oxfordshire: H7 strain confirmed as Highly Pathogenic<!-- InstanceEndEditable -->

                              <!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="Body" -->Following further laboratory results, the Chief Veterinary Officer has confirmed that the strain of H7 Avian Influenza present in laying hens at the farm in Banbury is highly pathogenic.
                              Further laboratory tests are in progress to identify the N type and possible relationships with previously identified viruses. A detailed epidemiological investigation to better understand the origin and development of the disease is also underway.
                              The 3km inner and 10km outer Temporary Control Zone was established on 3 June with measures appropriate to a highly pathogenic strain. These measures remain in place and existing restrictions continue to apply.
                              These restrictions include the housing or otherwise isolation from contact with wild birds in the inner 3km zone. All bird gatherings in the Temporary Control Zone are banned. Other movements of birds and some products are also banned in the whole of the Temporary Control Zone. Defra is urgently considering whether any wider measures may be needed. Please see the Defra website for detailed information on the restrictions.
                              The Health Protection Agency has confirmed that the risk to public health remains low. The Food Standards Agency has also confirmed that there are no safety implications for the human food chain.
                              Poultry keepers are urged to be extremely vigilant, practice the highest levels of biosecurity and report any suspicions of disease to their local Animal Health Office immediately.
                              <!-- InstanceEndEditable --><!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="Editors" -->Notes to editors<!-- InstanceEndEditable -->

                              <!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="Notes" -->1. AI viruses are categorized according to the ability to cause severe disease (pathogenicity) in avian species as either highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI) or low pathogenic (LPAI).
                              2. Further information can be found on the Defra website www.defra.gov.uk

                              http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2008/080604c.htm

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