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France - Local Zika detected in the Var - October 2019

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  • France - Local Zika detected in the Var - October 2019

    10/10/2019

    Zika detected in the Var. A few days ago, a person infected with the Zika virus transmitted by a tiger mosquito bite was diagnosed in Hyères. The mandatory reporting was done by the treating physician of the affected individual who was taken care of and is now cured.


    wikipedia
    Click image for larger version  Name:	250px-Var-Position.svg.png Views:	0 Size:	42.6 KB ID:	818770
    Le point sur la circulation. Les difficultés habituelles étaient à signaler ce jeudi matin sur les axes routiers varois, et notamment sur l'A57 où 8 kilomètres de bouchons étaient déjà recensés entre Cuers et Toulon.  La météo. En ce jeudi 10 octobre, le soleil brillera dans le Var mais sera accomp
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

  • #2

    A victim of the Zika virus has been identified in Hyères, it was reported on Wednesday 9 October.


    09 10 2019


    A few days ago, a person infected with the Zika virus transmitted by a tiger mosquito bite was diagnosed in Hyères.

    The mandatory reporting was done by the treating physician of the affected individual who was taken care of and is now cured.

    As confirmed by the Regional Health Agency, this is the only indigenous Zika case identified in 2019 in metropolitan France.

    This Wednesday morning, very early, an anti-vector campaign was conducted in an identified area of ​​presence of the tiger mosquito in the city of palms. These were the rue de

    l'Orangerie, the surroundings of Sainte-Marguerite Hospital and rue des Citronniers.
    Il y a quelques jours, une personne infectée par le virus Zika transmise par une piqûre de moustique tigre a été diagnostiquée à Hyères. Le signalement obligatoire a été fait par le médecin traitant de l'individu atteint qui a été pris en charge et est désormais guéri. Il s'agit, comme le confirme
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

    Comment


    • #3
      Translation Google
      Presence of an indigenous case of Zika in the department of Var.

      Press release

      October 9, 2019
      A person infected with the Zika virus was diagnosed in Hyères, Var. She was taken care of by her doctor and is now cured. This is the only indigenous case of Zika identified in 2019 in metropolitan France.

      Body of text We are talking about an aboriginal case when the person has contracted the disease on the national territory. These cases are distinguished from imported cases that contracted the disease during a trip to a contaminated area. Zika virus infection is a disease that can be transmitted from person to person through a tiger mosquito bite, such as dengue fever or chikungunya, as long as the virus is infected with the virus. Sexual transmission is also possible.

      The Regional Health Agency, Public Health France and the Mediterranean EID continue their investigations (entomological and epidemiological) to determine the origin of the case and prevent the spread of the disease.

      Vector control actions were implemented by the EID Mediterranean, under the auspices of the departmental council, in the area where the person lives: research of the tiger mosquito, mosquito control, mosquito trap placement. All these actions were preceded by an information campaign of the population residing in the neighborhood concerned.

      In parallel, epidemiological surveillance actions have been strengthened to identify people who may also be infected. An investigation is underway to look for possible cases in the vicinity of the person affected. Hospitals, private physicians and medical analysis laboratories in the affected area were contacted to identify individuals who may have symptoms of Zika and report them to the LRA.

      Measures to protect oneself and one's loved ones

      1 - Immediately consult your doctor in the presence of suggestive symptoms (skin rash, muscle or joint pain, fever, fatigue, headache), especially if they appear within 15 days of returning from an area trip. tropical.

      2 - To avoid the bites of mosquitoes-tigers , it is advisable to:
      • wear covering and loose clothing or even impregnate with fabric insecticide;
      • use a skin repellent in the evening, advised by your pharmacist, on the areas of skin discovered;
      • if necessary, use screens on openings (doors and windows);
      • sleeping under mosquito nets, which can also be impregnated with tissue insecticide. There are crib nets for newborns;
      • use electric diffusers inside homes;
      • use insecticide coils only outdoors;
      • use air conditioners or fans that interfere with mosquitoes.

      3 - To limit the development of tiger mosquitoes around his home , it is necessary to:
      • cover the water supply with mosquito nets or cloth to prevent colonization by mosquitoes;
      • clean gutters and gutters;
      • empty or store any container that may contain water;
      • avoid wild deposits of waste.

      https://www.paca.ars.sante.fr/presen...rtement-du-var
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Rapid risk assessment: Zika virus disease in Var department, France


        16 Oct 2019

        l
        On 1 October 2019, a case of locally acquired Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in France (Hyères city, Var department) was laboratory confirmed. To date, and based on ECDC’s epidemiological assessment, the probability of ongoing vector-borne local transmission in Hyères (and surrounding areas) is considered very low because current evidence does not indicate the existence of a more extensive cluster of ZIKV cases. As temperatures are progressively decreasing during autumn, the environmental conditions are currently not favourable for sustained transmission.



        Executive summary

        On 1 October 2019, a case of locally acquired Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in France (Hyères city, Var department) was laboratory confirmed. The case had symptoms compatible with ZIKV disease during the first half of August 2019. The case did not report any history of travel to countries with historical ZIKV transmission. No evidence of sexual transmission was retrieved during the investigation. No imported ZIKV disease cases were reported in the area in 2019. Further epidemiological investigations are ongoing to define the most probable mode of transmission. At this stage, vector-borne ZIKV transmission is the hypothesis that forms the basis for this ECDC risk assessment. If this hypothesis turned out to be correct, this event would mark the first case of autochtonous vectorborne transmission of ZIKV in Europe.

        Vector control measures are being implemented near the residence of the case. To date, investigations have not managed to identify additional cases, but further cases may be detected through ongoing active case finding.

        Ae. albopictus is widely established in southern Europe (see Ae. albopictus , current known distribution, August 2019) and a competent vector for ZIKV. However, it is considered a less competent vector than the tropical and subtropical vector Ae. aegypti. The occurrence of sporadic cases or clusters of locally acquired vector-borne ZIKV cases is possible, notably in the Mediterranean region of Europe when environmental conditions during summer and early autumn can support vector abundance and arbovirus replication at a level that is sufficient for autochthonous transmission of ZIKV. The report of a locally acquired ZIKV disease case in the southern part of France is thus not unexpected.

        To date, and based on ECDC’s epidemiological assessment, the probability of ongoing vector-borne local transmission in Hyères (and surrounding areas) is considered very low because current evidence does not indicate the existence of a more extensive cluster of ZIKV cases. As temperatures are progressively decreasing during autumn, the environmental conditions are currently not favourable for sustained transmission. The current risk posed to the population, including pregnant women and their unborn children, is very low. If autochthonous, vector-borne cases could be documented, for example by detecting additional locally acquired cases in the immediate vicinity of the case, the risk for pregnant women and unborn children would be low instead of very low. It is possible that the ongoing investigation will retrospectively identify locally acquired cases because Ae. albopictus abundance at the time the case had symptoms would have allowed vector-borne transmission. Currently, however, there is a very low likelihood that travellers to this area will become infected, introduce the virus, and initiate further local transmission in their EU/EEA country of residence.

        Substantial uncertainty regarding possible local transmission at the time of publication remains. The level of risk should be re-assessed when significant new facts become available.
        On 1 October 2019, a case of locally acquired Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in France (Hyères city, Var department) was laboratory confirmed. To date, and based on ECDC’s epidemiological assessment, the probability of ongoing vector-borne local transmission in Hyères (and surrounding areas) is considered very low because current evidence does not indicate the existence of a more extensive cluster of ZIKV cases.
        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

        Comment


        • #5
          Translation Google

          A second case of Zika diagnosed in the Var.

          Press release
          October 21, 2019
          Print page Visual

          A person with Zika virus infection has just been diagnosed in the Var. This brings to 2 the number of indigenous cases of Zika in the department. These people are healed today.
          Body of text

          We are talking about an aboriginal case when the person has contracted the disease on the national territory. These cases are distinguished from imported cases that contracted the disease during a trip to a contaminated area. This imported case, so far unidentified, is therefore at the origin of this transmission. Zika virus infection is a disease that is transmitted from person to person through a tiger mosquito bite, provided the latter is a carrier of the virus. Sexual transmission is also possible.

          The new person lives in Hyères, in the same neighborhood as the first indigenous case of Zika, reported by the Paca Regional Health Agency (ARS) on October 9th. This second case was identified following the survey that was conducted on October 10 by the ARS Paca and Public Health France near the neighborhood. This is called a "localized focus" of virus circulation. These two people contracted the disease following a tiger mosquito bite.

          What do you do when a person is diagnosed?

          The Regional Health Agency, Public Health France and the Interdepartmental Agreement on Mosquito Control (EID) Mediterranean continue their investigations (entomological and epidemiological) to prevent the spread of the disease.

          Vector control actions have been implemented by the EID Mediterranean, under the auspices of the departmental council, in the neighborhood of residence of the two people affected: research of the tiger mosquito, mosquito control, mosquito trap placement. All these actions were preceded by an information campaign of the population residing in the neighborhood concerned. In parallel, epidemiological surveillance actions have been strengthened to identify people who may also be infected. Hospitals, general practitioners, gynecologists, midwives and medical analysis laboratories in the area were contacted to identify people who might have Zika symptoms and report them to the LRA.

          Moreover, for a better understanding of this episode, the ARS and SPF will carry out a complementary field survey of the neighborhood population in the coming weeks.

          How does Zika virus infection manifest itself?

          In 70 to 80% of cases, people infected with the virus do not develop any symptoms. When present, symptoms may include low fever, headache, body aches and rash. The fever may be absent. It is also possible to observe conjunctivitis and pain behind the eyes. The evolution is generally favorable with spontaneous healing in 2 to 7 days without sequelae.

          In case of infection with Zika virus in a pregnant woman, the virus can be transmitted to the fetus and cause in a small percentage of cases, complications in the fetus.

          Everyone can protect themselves and their loved ones


          Protect yourself from mosquito bites by:
          • wearing covering and loose clothing, or even impregnating them with tissue insecticide;
          • using a skin repellent in the evening, advised by your pharmacist, on the areas of skin discovered;
          • using air conditioners or fans that interfere with mosquitoes;
          • if necessary, using screens on openings (doors and windows);
          • sleeping under mosquito nets, which can also be impregnated with fabric insecticide. There are crib nets for newborns;
          • using indoor electric diffusers or insecticide coils only outdoors.

          Avoid the proliferation of the tiger mosquito by:
          • covering the water supply with mosquito net or cloth to make them airtight;
          • emptying or storing any container that may contain water;
          • cleaning gutters and gutters;
          • avoiding wild deposits of waste.
          https://www.paca.ars.sante.fr/un-deu...ue-dans-le-var
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Translation Google

            Appearance of indigenous cases of zika and increase of indigenous cases of dengue fever in metropolitan France

            Health authorities increase vigilance against arboviruses and remind prevention councils
            published on 22.10.19

            Press releases and press kits Health Population Health

            The summer and fall of 2019 were marked by an increase in the number of indigenous dengue cases and the emergence of indigenous zika cases in mainland France. These findings encourage health authorities to increase vigilance and disseminate prevention advice to the population to control arbovirosis.

            Since August 1st, 2019, 7 autochthonous dengue cases have been identified in Vallauris, in the Maritime Alps. These people did not travel during the period when they may have become infected. Two other cases have been identified in Calluire, in the Rhône. These are the first confirmed autochthonous dengue cases in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region since the implementation of enhanced arbovirus surveillance in this region 7 years ago.

            In addition, a focus of two cases of zika virus infection has just been reported in the Var. This is probably the first autochthonous transmission by the documented mosquito Aedes albopictus (mosquito-tiger) in Europe. The two people concerned are now recovered and investigations are continuing to detect possible other cases and prevent the spread of the disease.

            At the same time, the number of "imported" cases seen in people who have contracted dengue, chikungunya or zika while traveling abroad remains high. Between 1 May and 4 October 2019, there are 502 imported cases of dengue, 48 imported cases of chikungunya and 5 imported cases of zika in the metropolitan departments where the mosquito Aedes albopictus is located. The importance of the number of imported cases in metropolitan France is also highly dependent on epidemics in the Overseas Departments and Territories. The dengue epidemic that affected Reunion in 2018-2019 has thus led to many cases imported into mainland France. Information of health professionals in the regions concerned


            The symptoms of dengue and zika may resemble those of an influenza state, they can be difficult to link to these diseases and are not systematically mentioned. This is why healthcare professionals have been made aware of the situation by the concerned RHAs, especially, because of cases of zika, those who have to take care of pregnant women, this virus can cause in rare cases malformations. birth. Mobilize and prevent to stem the spread in metropolis


            The presence of these indigenous homes also prompted the Director-General of Health to notify prefects of the change from the department of the Alpes-Maritimes to level 3 of the anti-dissemination plan for dengue, chikungunya and zika in metropolitan France.
            The goal of the health authorities is to stem the spread of these diseases. To reduce the risk of importation and implantation in mainland France, people returning from a country where dengue, chikungunya or zika viruses circulate must protect themselves effectively from mosquitoes, especially in the event of fever the 15 days following their return, so as not to favor the diffusion of the disease, and to consult without delay their doctor by signaling their recent trip.

            In addition, the National Anti-Dissemination Plan provides for surveillance of vector mosquitoes and human cases to prevent and assess the risk of spread, to reinforce the fight against mosquitoes, to inform and mobilize health professionals, to develop research and knowledge, and to mobilize the population to protect themselves and fight against the presence of mosquitoes Aedes albopictus, responsible for the transmission of these diseases.

            Dengue, zika: transmission and symptoms
            Dengue and zika can be transmitted by the mosquito Aedes Albopictus (tiger mosquito), present in metropolitan France since 2004. Today, it is established in 51 departments of metropolitan France. This mosquito can also transmit chikungunya. It is most common during the day, with more activity around sunrise and sunset. Zika can also be transmitted sexually, unlike dengue and chikungunya.

            Dengue is asymptomatic in 50% to 90% of cases. When symptoms occur, they occur within 3 to 15 days after mosquito bites and may be suggestive of influenza-like illness.
            Strong fever with sudden onset
            Chills
            Headaches
            Retro-orbital pain
            Nausea or vomiting
            Joint and muscle pain
            Rarely, rash by day 5 of symptoms
            The disease affects infants, young children and adults alike. Most often benign and healing spontaneously, although in very rare cases, it can be responsible for severe complications requiring hospitalization.

            Zika virus infection is asymptomatic in 50% to 90% of cases. The symptoms of zika are characterized by rash with or without fever, but also by conjunctivitis, headache, fatigue, muscle and joint pain, as well as retro-orbital pain. They generally remain benign and disappear spontaneously in 2 to 7 days. It can be responsible for a rare neurological complication: Guillain-Barré syndrome. When contracted during pregnancy, the zika virus can infect the fetus and cause rare cases of congenital anomalies. The incubation time is 3 to 15 days.

            Protect yourself from mosquitoes and prevent the spread of dengue, zika and chikungunya
            Mosquito that stings a person carrying dengue fever, chikungunya or zika back from a trip can, after 48h, infect in turn a new no one pricks it.
            In departments where the tiger mosquito is present
            Wear long and loose clothing, if possible impregnated with insecticide
            Use mosquito repellent
            Use electric diffusers inside the houses and coils outside
            Destroy or dry any stagnant water reserve outside or inside the home.
            If you go to a country where dengue, zika or chikungunya viruses circulate, you can protect yourself effectively. If you have a fever within 15 days of your return, protect yourself from mosquitoes so that you do not spread the disease, consult your doctor and systematically mention your trip abroad.

            Learn more about

            how to protect yourself How to protect yourself from dengue fever, chikungunya and zika
            See the video More about the tiger mosquito
            The anti-dissemination plan for dengue fever, chikungunya and zika in metropolitan France

            https://solidarites-sante.gouv.fr/ac...autochtones-de
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Epidemiological update: second case of locally acquired Zika virus disease in Hyères, France


              23 Oct 2019

              On 21 October, French authorities reported a second autochthonous case of Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in Hyères city, Var department, France with no travel history to Zika-endemic countries.

              The case was identified through door-to-door active case-finding and resides in the close vicinity of the first case. The patient reported symptoms compatible with ZIKV disease (i.e. fever, asthenia, retro-orbital pain and body rash) starting on 6 August 2019, a few days before the onset of symptoms of the first case. Both patients have now recovered. Risk Assessment


              This new case reinforces the hypothesis of vector-borne transmission of ZIKV in this neighbourhood of Hyères city in August 2019. As the two cases had onset of symptoms a few days apart, it is likely they belong to the same transmission cycle. To our knowledge, this is the first documented vector-borne transmission of ZIKV by Aedes albopictus in Europe. French health authorities are conducting investigations to identify other possible cases and to avoid further transmission.

              As temperatures are progressively decreasing during autumn, the environmental conditions are currently not favourable for sustained transmission. To date, the overall conclusions of the rapid risk assessment issued by ECDC on 16 October 'Zika virus disease in Var department, France' remain unchanged. The risk posed to the population, including pregnant women and their unborn children, is low. There is a very low likelihood that travellers to this area will become infected, introduce the virus, and initiate further local transmission in their EU/EEA country of residence.

              On 21 October, French authorities reported a second autochthonous case of Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in Hyères city, Var department, France with no travel history to Zika-endemic countries.
              “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
              Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

              ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

              Comment


              • #8
                Translation Google

                ZIKA | Native cases of Zika in the Var, August 2019

                Alert

                On 01/10, the arbovirus CNR confirmed an indigenous case
                Zika virus infection. The case was originally identified by the
                transmission of positive laboratory results by the laboratory
                Biomnis. The case is domiciled in the municipality of Hyères in the
                Var and began his signs in mid-August.

                If Zika can be sexually transmitted, interrogation of
                case was pointing towards a vector transmission (mosquito bites
                infected tiger).

                Strengthening epidemiological surveillance following
                alert

                Following the alert, an active case search was launched associating
                raising awareness among health professionals in the municipality
                of Hyères, a door-to-door survey (PAP) around the home
                of the confirmed case and a retrospective search of
                monitoring data.

                Epidemiological situation

                As of 29/10, 3 cases of Zika virus infection have been diagnosed in
                the commune of Hyères. Cases started their signs 07 and
                15/08. They live within 100 m of distance. None were
                hospitalized.


                The second case was identified during the door-to-door
                took place on 10/10. The 3rd case, absent on the day of the survey,
                had been the recipient of an information note and had consulted
                doctor as a result of our visit. The case was confirmed on
                23/10 by the CNR.


                The detection of these 3 cases reinforces the hypothesis of a
                transmission of the virus through tiger mosquitoes.
                The imported primary case at the origin of autochthonous transmission
                has not been identified at this stage.

                Control measures

                Entomological investigations and vector control actions
                The actions of the EID have been prioritized according to the elements
                collected during epidemiological investigations.
                Priority investigation area (Hyères)

                The entomological survey of the Mediterranean EID was carried out
                the 07/10 within a radius of 200 m around the home of the 1st case
                Indigenous reported.

                Several adulticidal treatments on the risk zone were carried out between 09 and 18/10.
                The door-to-door interventions initiated as of 07/10, were
                pursued to eliminate, or treat with a biocide, the cottages
                larvae identified and remind the inhabitants of the good gestures
                to fight mosquito vectors of disease.

                Other areas

                Entomological actions (prospections, LAV) were carried out
                or are programmed in all places frequented by
                during periods of viremia.

                Information of pregnant women who have frequented the area
                risk

                Between 22 and 28/10, health professionals (general practitioners, midwives and gynecologists-obstetricians) practicing
                in Hyères and in surrounding communes (Toulon, Carqueiranne,
                La Crau, Pierrefeu du Var and La Londe-les-Maures) were informed of how pregnant women should behave for their patients who visited the risk zone between 01/07 and 30/09.

                In addition, it was also recommended to pregnant women
                among the staff of the institutions in the area at risk (hotel,
                Clinic and Ehpad) and the hotel's clientele from the area to get closer to their doctor to have a search for infection done
                by the Zika virus.

                Communication

                ARS Paca issued a press release (CP) on 09/10 to
                to inform the population of the occurrence of a confirmed case in the
                Var and to recall the measures of personal protection and
                destruction of breeding sites. A second CP was sent on
                21/10 announcing an Aboriginal case and informing about risk
                for pregnant women.

                In addition, a communication on the epidemiological situation
                in France was carried out at European level (ECDC).

                A first in Europe ...

                This is the first time in Europe that a vector transmission of
                Zika by Aedes albopictus is identified. So it is necessary
                to best document this episode. This is why
                epidemiological, microbiological and
                entomological problems continue.

                In particular, it is very important to be able to identify the virus circulating from the samples of the 3 indigenous cases, and to
                able to measure the vector competence of mosquitoes from
                the circulation zone (trapping) with respect to the Zika virus.

                In addition, a seroprevalence survey is scheduled in November, as was done in Nîmes.
                in 2015. The objective is to collect all people living in
                the district of the cases (map below), whether they were ill or not this summer, to evaluate as accurately as possible
                the extent of the traffic. As a reminder, 50 to 80% of infections
                Zika virus are asymptomatic.

                AS A REMINDER,
                the tiger mosquito does not carry naturally
                of the virus:
                transmission begins with the contamination of a mosquito after stinging a sick person back from
                trip, mostly from the intertropical zone.

                Page 4 -
                https://www.paca.ars.sante.fr/system...aca-201943.pdf
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  Epidemiological update: third case of locally acquired Zika virus disease in Hyères, France

                  31 Oct 2019

                  On 30 October, French authorities reported a third autochthonous case of Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in Hyères city, Var department, France. The case had no travel history to Zika-endemic countries.

                  The case was identified through active case-finding activities and resides in the close vicinity of the first two cases. These three cases had onset of symptoms in early/mid-August 2019, and all have recovered.

                  Measures implemented
                  French health authorities have reinforced their epidemiological surveillance to identify other possible cases. Entomological investigations were carried out in and around the affected neighbourhood; vector control activities were implemented.

                  Healthcare providers such as general practitioners, mid-wives and gynaecologists/obstetricians working in Hyères city and neighbouring cities were alerted about the event, and instructions were provided for the management of pregnant patients that live in, or visited, the affected area between July and September 2019.

                  A communication campaign was launched to inform citizens about personal protective measures and the destruction of larval sites.

                  Risk assessment
                  This new case reinforces the hypothesis of autochthonous vector-borne transmission of ZIKV in this neighbourhood of Hyères city in August 2019. As the cases had onset of symptoms only a few days apart, it is likely that they belong to the same transmission cycle. To ECDC’s knowledge, this event was the first report of vector-borne transmission of ZIKV by Aedes albopictus in Europe.

                  As temperatures are progressively decreasing during autumn, the environmental conditions are currently not favourable for sustained transmission. To date, the overall conclusions of the rapid risk assessment issued by ECDC on 16 October (‘Zika virus disease in Var department, France’) remain unchanged. The risk for the population, including pregnant women and their unborn children, is low. There is a very low likelihood that travellers to this area will become infected, introduce the virus, and initiate further local transmission in their EU/EEA country of residence.
                  On 30 October, French authorities reported a third autochthonous case of Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in Hyères city, Var department, France. The case had no travel history to Zika-endemic countries.
                  “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                  Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                  ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Source: https://www.who.int/csr/don/01-novem...ase-france/en/
                    Zika virus disease – France

                    Disease outbreak news
                    1 November 2019



                    On 9 October 2019, the French authorities reported an autochthonous Zika virus (ZKV) case in Hyeres, Var department, France. The case had reported symptom onset on 29 July 2019. No travel history to Zika endemic countries was reported for the patient or partner. Since this notification, French authorities reported an additional two probable autochthonous ZKV cases, identified through active case finding, in Hyeres, in the same area and same timeframe (symptom onsets of the three cases from 6 to 15 August 2019). All three patients have recovered.

                    Epidemiological and entomological field investigations by French authorities are still ongoing to determine the possible route(s) of transmission for these cases, prevent further spread and detect possible associated cases.

                    It is probable that the three cases resulted from vector-borne transmission of ZKV in this neighborhood in late July/early August. This is probably the first episode of ZKV local vector-borne transmission detected in metropolitan France and in Europe. Public health response

                    Local health authorities have implemented vector control activities, including mosquito detection, in the neighborhood of the cases.

                    Epidemiological investigations have been implemented to identify additional cases in the area. Hospitals and healthcare professionals within the area and the department were informed about diagnosis and detection of ZKV and notification of suspect cases. Tailored information has been provided to health professionals in charge of pregnant women living or having stayed in the neighborhood of the cases. WHO risk assessment

                    The overall risk for disease spread at national level is very low given that the primary vector for ZKV transmission Aedes aegypti is not established in France. A less competent but potential vector for spread, Aedes albopictus, is established; however, the colder temperatures of the upcoming winter season will be progressively less suitable for vector activities to support Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission.

                    There was no evidence in favor of sexual and organ/tissue transmission in all three cases and there is no history of travel outside metropolitan France. This suggests that the three cases were likely the result of vector-borne transmission of ZKV locally.

                    To date, there is no evidence of further spread beyond these three cases. However, French authorities are conducting further epidemiological investigations to assess the full extent of this possible viral circulation in the area. As 50-80% of ZKV cases are known to be asymptomatic, it is possible that infection of the known cases originated from asymptomatic infected people through mosquito bites.

                    At the regional level and global level, the aggregate risk for disease spread is considered very low. WHO advice

                    Protection against mosquito bites during the day and early evening is a key measure to prevent Zika virus infection. Special attention should be given to prevention of mosquito bites among pregnant women, women of reproductive age, and young children.

                    Personal protective measures include wearing clothing (preferably light-colored) that covers as much of the body as possible; using physical barriers such as window screens and closed doors and windows; and applying insect repellent to skin or clothing that contains DEET, IR3535 or icaridin according to the product label instructions.

                    Aedes mosquitoes breed in small collections of water around homes, schools, and work sites. It is important to eliminate these mosquitoes breeding sites by: covering water storage containers, removing standing water in flower pots, and cleaning up trash and used tires. Community initiatives are essential to support local government and public health programs. Clean- up campaigns initiated at the community level are encouraged to get rid of all solid waste in back yards in and around houses and vacant plots. Health authorities may also advise use of larvicides and insecticides to reduce mosquito populations and disease spread.

                    ZKV can be transmitted through sexual intercourse. This is of particular concern due to an association between ZKV infection and adverse pregnancy and fetal outcomes. For regions with active transmission of ZKV, all sexually active men and women and in particular infected people and their sexual partners, should be counselled about how to protect themselves from Zika infection and offered a full range of contraceptive methods to make an informed choice about pregnancy risks and safer sex.

                    Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent ZKV infection, and no specific treatment for ZKV infection or its associated diseases.

                    WHO advises against the application of any travel or trade restrictions with the affected country regarding this event.

                    For more information, please see the links below:

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Translation Google

                      Zika virus: first cases of transmission in metropolitan France by the tiger mosquito

                      Anna-Bella Failloux, Institut Pasteur and Arnaud Fontanet, Cnam
                      Posted on 4 November 2019 - Updated on 4 November 2019
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                      Go back to the source of the infection

                      In 2015 and 2016, during the epidemics that affected Latin America, Central America, the West Indies and South-East Asia, no indigenous case of Zika had been recorded in France, despite the hundreds of cases imported at the end of the summer holidays.

                      The two proven cases revealed at the end of October, however, confirm the ability of the tiger mosquito to transmit Zika virus from imported cases, even though the current situation is very different from that of a few years ago. Indeed, today the circulation of the Zika virus is less intense: it is observed only in a few homes in America. It must be emphasized, however, that Zika virus is also endemic in Africa, where sporadic cases are regularly identified.

                      To understand how French infections may have occurred in this context, it will be necessary to wait for the results of the epidemiological investigations, which will make it possible to go back to their sources. The sequencing of the genomes of the viruses responsible for these two indigenous cases will make it possible to identify the genotype of the Zika virus, and therefore its geographical origin.

                      It is important to determine which strain of the virus has been implicated in the infections, since this influences its transmission. By infecting the tiger mosquito in the laboratory with viruses of different geographical origins, the researchers found that it was ten times more efficient to transmit West African viruses than to transmit those isolated during the epidemics that affected the Americas.
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                      http://blog.cnam.fr/sante/virus-zika...e-1119743.kjsp
                      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                      -Nelson Mandela

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