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Germany - Experimental transmission of Zika virus by Aedes japonicus japonicus

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  • Germany - Experimental transmission of Zika virus by Aedes japonicus japonicus

    Experimental transmission of Zika virus by Aedes japonicus japonicus from southwestern Germany


    Published: 28 November 2018

    Abstract

    The invasive mosquito species Aedes japonicus japonicus (Ae. japonicus) is widely distributed in Central Europe and is a known vector of various arboviruses in the laboratory, including flaviviruses such as Japanese Encephalitis virus or West Nile virus.

    However, the vector competence of Ae. japonicus for the recently emerging Zika virus (ZIKV) has not been determined. Therefore, field-caught Ae. japonicus from Germany were orally infected with ZIKV and incubated at 21, 24, or 27 °C to evaluate the vector competence under climate conditions representative of the temperate regions (21 °C) in the species’ main distribution area in Europe and of Mediterranean regions (27 °C). Aedes japonicus was susceptible to ZIKV at all temperatures, showing infection rates between 10.0% (21 °C) and 66.7% (27 °C). However, virus transmission was detected exclusively at 27 °C with a transmission rate of 14.3% and a transmission efficiency of 9.5%. T

    aking into account the present distribution of Ae. japonicus in the temperate regions of Central Europe, the risk of ZIKV transmission by the studied Ae. japonicus population in Central Europe has to be considered as low.

    Nevertheless, due to the species’ vector competence for ZIKV and other mosquito-borne viruses, in combination with the possibility of further spread to Mediterranean regions, Ae. japonicus must be kept in mind as a potential vector of pathogens inside and outside of Europe.


    ...the invasive Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Ae. japonicus) is widely distributed in Central Europe and is currently established in at least 10 countries, including large parts of Germany8.
    In 2008, the first invasive spreading of
    Ae. japonicus in Europe was reported in Switzerland9, and Ae. japonicus is now listed as one of the nine most dominant mosquito species in Switzerland.
    Shortly after its introduction in Switzerland,
    Ae. japonicuswas first reported in Germany, followed by the establishment of populations at several sites. In the Netherlands and Belgium, mosquito control programs have been initiated due to the massive Ae. japonicuspopulations.
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~
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