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  • England: 2022 Monkeypox cases

    Source: https://uk.news.yahoo.com/rare-case-...XDbQUkHpuI4tuD

    Evening StandardEvening Standard
    Rare case of monkeypox confirmed in England
    Sami Quadri
    Sat, 7 May 2022, 10:09 am·2-min read

    A person in England has been diagnosed with monkeypox, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has said.

    The patient had recently travelled from Nigeria, which is where they are believed to have contracted the infection, before travelling to the UK.

    The person is receiving care at the expert infectious disease unit at the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in London.

    Experts at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) are monitoring the case and working closely with NHS colleagues to contact people who might have been in close contact with the individual...

  • #2
    Monkeypox case confirmed in England


    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) can confirm an individual has been diagnosed with monkeypox in England.
    From:UK Health Security Agency

    Published 7 May 2022

    The patient has a recent travel history from Nigeria, which is where they are believed to have contracted the infection, before travelling to the UK.

    Monkeypox is a rare viral infection that does not spread easily between people. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness and most people recover within a few weeks. However, severe illness can occur in some individuals.

    The infection can be spread when someone is in close contact with an infected person; however, there is a very low risk of transmission to the general population.

    The patient is receiving care at the expert infectious disease unit at the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London.

    As a precautionary measure, UKHSA experts are working closely with NHS colleagues and will be contacting people who might have been in close contact with the individual to provide information and health advice.

    This includes contacting a number of passengers who travelled in close proximity to the patient on the same flight to the UK. People without symptoms are not considered infectious but, as a precaution, those who have been in close proximity are being contacted to ensure that if they do become unwell they can be treated quickly. If passengers are not contacted then there is no action they should take.

    Dr Colin Brown, Director of Clinical and Emerging Infections, UKHSA, said:
    It is important to emphasise that monkeypox does not spread easily between people and the overall risk to the general public is very low.

    We are working with NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSEI) to contact the individuals who have had close contact with the case prior to confirmation of their infection, to assess them as necessary and provide advice.

    UKHSA and the NHS have well established and robust infection control procedures for dealing with cases of imported infectious disease and these will be strictly followed.


    Dr Nicholas Price, Director NHSE High Consequence Infection Diseases (airborne) Network and Consultant in Infectious Diseases at Guy’s and St Thomas’, said:
    The patient is being treated in our specialist isolation unit at St Thomas’ Hospital by expert clinical staff with strict infection prevention procedures. This is a good example of the way that the High Consequence Infectious Diseases national network and UKHSA work closely together in responding swiftly and effectively to these sporadic cases.


    Initial symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, then spreading to other parts of the body. The rash changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab, which later falls off.


    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/m...d-in-england-1
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
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      • #4
        Source: https://www.independent.ie/world-new...-41649409.html


        Two more monkeypox cases identified in England
        Thomas Kingsley
        May 14 2022 12:43 PM

        Two more cases of monkeypox have been identified in England, the UK Health Security Agency has announced.

        They are unrelated to a case found on May 7, but they are in the same household, the announcement declared.

        One of the cases is receiving care at the expert infectious disease unit at St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London. The other case is isolating and does not currently require hospital treatment.

        As a precautionary measure, UKHSA experts are working closely with the individuals and NHS colleagues and will be contacting people who might have been in close contact to provide information and health advice...

        Comment


        • #5
          Monkeypox cases confirmed in England

          Two individuals have been diagnosed with monkeypox in London, confirms the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA).


          From:UK Health Security Agency

          Published14 May 2022





          The cases live together in the same household. They are not linked to the previous confirmed case announced on 7 May. Where and how they acquired their infection remains under investigation.

          Monkeypox is a rare viral infection that does not spread easily between people. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness and most people recover within a few weeks. However, severe illness can occur in some people.

          The infection can be spread when someone is in close contact with an infected person, however, there is a very low risk of transmission to the general population.

          One of the cases is receiving care at the expert infectious disease unit at St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London. The other case is isolating and does not currently require hospital treatment.

          As a precautionary measure, UKHSA experts are working closely with the individuals and NHS colleagues and will be contacting people who might have been in close contact to provide information and health advice.

          People without symptoms are not considered infectious but, as a precaution, those who have been in close proximity to the individuals are being contacted to ensure that, if they do become unwell, they can be treated quickly.

          Dr Colin Brown, Director of Clinical and Emerging Infections, UKHSA, said:
          We have confirmed 2 new monkeypox cases in England that are not linked to the case announced on May 7. While investigations remain ongoing to determine the source of infection, it is important to emphasise it does not spread easily between people and requires close personal contact with an infected symptomatic person. The overall risk to the general public remains very low.

          We are contacting any potential close contacts of the case. We are also working with the NHS to reach any healthcare contacts who have had close contact with the cases prior to confirmation of their infection, to assess them as necessary and provide advice.

          UKHSA and the NHS have well established and robust infection control procedures for dealing with cases of imported infectious disease and these will be strictly followed.


          Professor Julian Redhead, medical director at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, said:
          We are caring for a patient in our specialist high consequence infectious diseases unit at St Mary’s Hospital. All of the necessary infectious control procedures have been followed and we are working closely with UKHSA and NHS England.



          Symptoms


          Initial symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion.

          A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, then spreading to other parts of the body, particularly the hands and feet.

          The rash changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab, which later falls off.


          https://www.gov.uk/government/news/m...med-in-england
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Source: https://www.who.int/emergencies/dise...em/2022-DON381


            Monkeypox - United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
            16 May 2022

            Situation at a glance

            On 7 May 2022, WHO was informed of a confirmed case of monkeypox in an individual who travelled from the United Kingdom to Nigeria.


            The case developed a rash on 29 April 2022 and returned to the United Kingdom on 4 May. Monkeypox was suspected and the case was immediately isolated. As of 11 May, extensive contact tracing has been undertaken to identify exposed contacts in healthcare settings, the community and the international flight. These individuals are being followed up for 21 days from the date of last exposure with the case. None has reported compatible symptoms so far.


            Since the case was immediately isolated and contact tracing was performed, the risk of onward transmission related to this case in the United Kingdom is minimal. However, as the source of infection in Nigeria is not known, there remains a risk of ongoing transmission in this country.


            Description of the case


            On 7 May 2022, the National IHR Focal Point for the United Kingdom notified WHO of a confirmed case of monkeypox in an individual who travelled from United Kingdom to Nigeria from late April to early May 2022 and stayed in Lagos and Delta States in Nigeria. The case developed a rash on 29 April and returned to the United Kingdom, arriving on 4 May. On the same day (4 May), the case presented to hospital. Based on the travel history and rash illness, monkeypox was suspected at an early stage and the case was isolated immediately. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment was ensured during hospitalization. Monkeypox (West African clade) was laboratory confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on a vesicular swab on 6 May by the United Kingdom Health Security Agency (UKHSA) Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory.


            Epidemiology of the disease


            Monkeypox is a sylvatic zoonosis with incidental human infections that usually occur sporadically in forested parts of Central and West Africa. It is caused by the monkeypox virus which belongs to the orthopoxvirus family. Monkeypox can be transmitted by contact and droplet exposure via exhaled large droplets. The incubation period of monkeypox is usually from 6 to 13 days but can range from 5 to 21 days. The disease is often self-limiting with symptoms usually resolving spontaneously within 14 to 21 days. Symptoms can be mild or severe, and lesions can be very itchy or painful. The animal reservoir remains unknown, although is likely to be among rodents. Contact with live and dead animals through hunting and consumption of wild game or bush meat are known risk factors.


            There are two clades of monkeypox virus, the West African clade and Congo Basin (Central African) clade. Although the West African clade of monkeypox virus infection sometimes leads to severe illness in some individuals, disease is usually self-limiting. The case fatality ratio for the West African clade has been documented to be around 1%, whereas for the Congo Basin clade, it may be as high as 10%. Children are also at higher risk, and monkeypox during pregnancy may lead to complications, congenital monkeypox or stillbirth.


            Milder cases of monkeypox may go undetected and represent a risk of person-to-person transmission. There is likely to be little immunity to the infection in those travelling and exposed as endemic disease is geographically limited to parts of West and Central Africa. While a vaccine has been approved for prevention of monkeypox, and traditional smallpox vaccine also provides protection, these vaccines are not widely available and populations worldwide under the age of 40 or 50 years no longer benefit from the protection afforded by prior smallpox vaccination programmes.



            Public health response

            • Health authorities in the United Kingdom have set up an incident management team to coordinate identification and management of contacts.


            • As of 11 May, extensive contact tracing has identified exposed contacts in the community, the healthcare setting and on the international flight. None has reported compatible symptoms so far.


            • All identified contacts have been assessed and classified based on their exposure to the case and are being followed up accordingly through either active or passive surveillance for 21 days after their last exposure to the case. Post-exposure prophylaxis with vaccination is being offered to the higher risk contacts.


            • Nigerian authorities were informed about this case and travel history in Nigeria on 7 May. The case did not report contact with anyone with a rash illness or known monkeypox in Nigeria. Details of travel and contacts within Nigeria have been shared with authorities in Nigeria for follow up as necessary.



            WHO risk assessment

            In the United Kingdom, there have been seven cases of monkeypox previously reported; all importations were related to a travel history to or from Nigeria. In 2021, there were also two separate human monkeypox cases imported from Nigeria reported by the United States of America.


            Since September 2017, Nigeria has continued to report cases of monkeypox. From September 2017 to 30 April 2022, a total of 558 suspected cases have been reported from 32 states in the country. Of these, 241 were confirmed cases, and among these there were eight deaths recorded (Case Fatality Ratio: 3.3%). From 1 January to 30 April 2022, 46 suspected cases have been reported of which 15 were confirmed from seven states - Adamawa (three cases), Lagos (three cases), Cross River (two cases), Federal Capital Territory (FCT) (two cases), Kano (two cases), Delta (two cases) and Imo (one case). No death has been recorded in 2022.


            In the present case, the source of infection is currently unknown and the risk of further transmission in Nigeria cannot be excluded. Once monkeypox was suspected in the United Kingdom, authorities promptly initiated appropriate public health measures, including isolation of the case and contact tracing. The risk of potential onward spread related to this case in the United Kingdom is therefore minimal. As the source of infection in Nigeria is not known, there remains a risk of further transmission in Nigeria.


            Importations of monkeypox from an endemic country to another country has been documented on eight previous occasions. In this instance, the confirmed case has a history of travel from Delta state in Nigeria, where monkeypox is endemic.



            WHO advice

            Any illness during travel or upon return from an endemic area should be reported to a health professional, including information about all recent travel and immunization history. Residents and travelers to endemic countries should avoid contact with sick animals (dead or alive) that could harbour monkeypox virus (rodents, marsupials, primates) and should refrain from eating or handling wild game (bush meat). The importance of hand hygiene using soap and water, or alcohol-based sanitizer should be emphasized. While a vaccine and specific treatment have recently been approved for monkeypox, in 2019 and 2022 respectively, these countermeasures are not yet widely available.


            A patient with monkeypox should be isolated and provided with supportive care during the presumed and known infectious periods, that is during the prodromal (early signs) and rash stages of the illness, respectively. Timely contact tracing, surveillance measures and raising awareness of imported emerging diseases among health care providers are essential for preventing further secondary cases and effective management of monkeypox outbreaks.


            Health workers caring for patients with suspected or confirmed monkeypox should implement standard, contact and droplet infection control precautions. This includes all workers such as cleaners and laundry personnel who may be exposed to the patient care setting, bedding, towels, or personal belongings. Samples taken from people with suspected monkeypox or animals with suspected monkeypox virus infection should be handled by trained staff working in suitably equipped laboratories.


            International travel and trade: WHO does not recommend any restriction for travel to and trade with Nigeria or the United Kingdom based on available information at this time...





            Comment


            • #7
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              • #8
                Translation google

                Monkey pox: several cases detected in England, should we be worried?

                Three cases of monkey pox (or "monkeypox") have been officially recorded in the United Kingdom in a few days. What does this disease look like? Is it dangerous? Is a pandemic possible? Decryption.

                By SM-P. - Yesterday at 6:30 p.m. -
                ...

                Why are we talking about it ?

                Several cases have been detected since the beginning of May in England.

                The first alert from the British health security agency dates from May 7. It concerns a patient who recently traveled to Nigeria, where he is believed to have contracted the infection, before returning to the UK. He is being treated at St Thomas' Hospital in London, in a specialist isolation unit.

                Two other cases were officially identified this Saturday. These are two people who live in the same household. It is not yet known where and how they were infected. We only know that these two cases are not related to the previous one. An investigation is underway to shed light on the origin of their contamination.

                One of these two people is being treated at St Mary's Hospital in London, in a service of infectious disease experts. The other person's condition does not require hospitalization at this time. She simply has to respect isolation.
                ...

                What is this disease?

                Monkeypox belongs, like classical smallpox, to the group of orthopoxviruses. It is transmitted to humans via animals, most often rodents. But it was first identified in monkeys in 1958.

                The first human cases were detected in 1970, in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

                Since then, several African countries have been affected: Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Gabon, Côte d'Ivoire, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Sudan. The disease is still present sporadically in parts of central and western Africa, near tropical rainforests.

                In 2003, an epidemic occurred in the United States after rodents were imported from Africa to be used as pets. A few cases had also already been detected in 2018 in Great Britain.

                1 to 10%

                Monkeypox is usually a mild illness. With care, most patients recover. However, a severe form can occur in some people. On average, the fatality rate is estimated between 1 and 10%. Most deaths occur in very young children.
                ...

                Should we be worried?

                “Monkeypox is not easily transmitted between people,” says Dr Colin Brown, director of clinical and emerging infections at the UK Health Security Agency.

                The infection can spread when a person is in close contact with an infected and symptomatic case. Overall, therefore, the risk of transmission to the general population is very low.
                ...

                Decline of immunity

                The Institut Pasteur notes, however, that the number of cases and epidemics of monkeypox seems to have increased in Africa since 2000.

                He emphasizes the global decline in immunity to viruses of the orthopoxvirus genus (responsible for human smallpox), after the cessation of smallpox vaccination, which provided cross-protection against monkeypox.

                The researchers thus “found that a low immunity of the population, of the order of 10 to 25%, can allow an infected person to cause 1.10 to 2.40 new cases and thus to trigger an epidemic. »

                This is the status of many Western countries, where smallpox vaccination ceased in 1980 or earlier, and immunity has continued to decline, leaving the current population vulnerable to a monkeypox pandemic.

                "Monkey pox could thus become the most important orthopoxvirus infection in humans", emphasizes the Institut Pasteur.

                https://www.ledauphine.com/sante/202...on-s-inquieter
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...pox-cases.html

                  Four more people have been diagnosed with monkeypox in the UK, bringing the total number of cases in the latest outbreak to seven.

                  All four new patients are gay or bisexual men who were infected in London and had no travel links to Africa, health chiefs have confirmed after MailOnline broke the news earlier today.

                  Two are known to each other but have no connection to any of the previous cases, in a sign the virus is spreading in the community for the first time.
                  ?The only security we have is our ability to adapt."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Monkeypox cases confirmed in England – latest updates


                    Latest updates on cases of monkeypox identified by the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA).

                    From:UK Health Security Agency[
                    Published 14 May 2022
                    Last updated 16 May 2022 See all updates

                    Latest

                    Four more cases of monkeypox indentified by UKHSA


                    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has detected 4 additional cases of monkeypox, 3 in London and one linked case in the north east of England.

                    The 4 new cases do not have known connections with the previous confirmed cases announced on 14 May and the case announced on 7 May.

                    Investigations are underway to establish links between the latest 4 cases, who all appear to have been infected in London. All 4 of these cases self-identify as gay, bisexual or other men who have sex with men (MSM).


                    Currently, common contacts have been identified for 2 of the 4 latest cases.

                    There is no link to travel to a country where monkeypox is endemic, and exactly where and how they acquired their infections remains under urgent investigation, including whether they have further links to each other.


                    Those patients needing medical care are all in specialist infectious disease units at the Royal Free Hosptial, Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle upon Tyne and Guys’ and St Thomas’. The individuals have the West African clade of the virus, which is mild compared to the Central African clade.

                    These latest cases mean that there are currently 7 confirmed monkeypox cases in the UK, diagnosed between 6 and 15 May.

                    Due to the recent increase in cases and uncertainties around where some of these individuals acquired their infection, we are working closely with NHS partners to identify if there may have been more cases in recent weeks, as well as international partners to understand if similar rises have been seen in other countries.

                    Monkeypox is a viral infection usually associated with travel to West Africa. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness, spread by very close contact with someone with monkeypox and most people recover within a few weeks.

                    The virus does not spread easily between people and the risk to the UK population is low. However, the most recent cases are in gay, bisexual and other MSM communities, and as the virus spreads through close contact, we are advising these groups to be alert to any unusual rashes or lesions on any part of their body, especially their genitalia, and to contact a sexual health service if they have concerns.

                    Anyone with concerns that they could be infected with monkeypox is advised to make contact with clinics ahead of their visit. We can assure them their call or discussion will be treated sensitively and confidentially.

                    Dr Susan Hopkins, Chief Medical Adviser, UKHSA, said:
                    This is rare and unusual. UKHSA is rapidly investigating the source of these infections because the evidence suggests that there may be transmission of the monkeypox virus in the community, spread by close contact.

                    We are particularly urging men who are gay and bisexual to be aware of any unusual rashes or lesions and to contact a sexual health service without delay.

                    We are contacting any potential close contacts of the cases to provide health information and advice.


                    Clinicians should be alert to individuals presenting with rashes without a clear alternative diagnosis and should contact specialist services for advice.


                    Symptoms


                    Initial symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, then spreading to other parts of the body including the genitals.

                    The rash changes and goes through different stages, and can look like chickenpox or syphilis, before finally forming a scab, which later falls off.



                    ...
                    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/m...update-history
                    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                    -Nelson Mandela

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      bump this

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                      • #12
                        Monkeypox ‘spreading in sexual networks’

                        Seven cases of the virus have been recorded so far in England, with six in London and one in the North East


                        By Joe Pinkstone,
                        SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT
                        17 May 2022 • 1:42pm

                        Monkeypox is likely to be a sexually transmissible virus, experts believe, that may be driving the outbreak in Britain.

                        Previously it was believed the virus could only spread by close contact including with lesions or via an infected person’s exhaled respiratory droplets.

                        But emerging evidence indicates the virus could also be contracted during sexual intercourse, a link which has never been seen before.

                        Seven cases of the virus have been recorded so far in England, with six in London and one in the North East.

                        Four of the seven cases seen in England in the past two weeks are in gay or bisexual men and this is “highly suggestive” of sex being a driver of transmission, according to experts.

                        Mateo Prochazka, an STI expert and the head of the UK Health Security Agency team investigating the monkeypox cases, said sex has never been described before as a means of its transmission.

                        “Close contact between two people [such as during sex] could facilitate transmission - but this has never been described before,” he said.
                        ...
                        Scientists are divided on the theory, with some agreeing that this could be the first documentation of the virus being passed during sex.

                        “This may indeed be the first time transmission of monkeypox via sexual contact has been documented, although it has not been confirmed to be the case,” said Dr Michael Head, a global health scientist from the University of Southampton.

                        Prof Neil Mabbott, personal chair in immunopathology at the University of Edinburgh, added: “Transmission of monkeypox virus infection in humans by sexual contact has not previously been documented, and the recent cases suggest a potentially novel means of spread.”
                        ...
                        https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/202...lth-officials/
                        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                        -Nelson Mandela

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          UK monkeypox outbreak ‘unprecedented’ as officials say sexual contact likely route of transmission

                          Sudden emergence of cases, and uncertainties around how and where individuals contracted virus, has left scientists puzzled, with sexual contact seen as likely route of transmission

                          Samuel Lovett
                          Science Correspondent
                          2 hours ago

                          ...
                          “This outbreak of monkeypox is unprecedented in the UK and has provoked urgent public health action," said Jimmy Whitworth, a professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

                          Dr Michael Head, a senior research fellow in global health at the University of Southampton, said: “There’s currently gaps in our knowledge, and the contact tracing and public health investigation being carried out by UKHSA will no doubt reveal more in due course, for example about how pattern of transmission.”

                          He added: “However, it would be very unusual to see anything more than a handful of cases in any outbreak, and we won’t be seeing Covid-style levels of transmission.”

                          Four out of seven cases in the current outbreak are gay or bisexual, which is “highly suggestive of spread in sexual networks,” according to Mateo Prochazka, an infectious disease epidemiologist at UKHSA who is leading the agency’s investigation.
                          ...
                          Professor Francois Balloux, director of UCL Genetics Institute, said: “I would urge some caution at this stage before concluding that monkeypox has morphed into a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI).
                          ...

                          The seven people diagnosed with monkeypox in the UK have been infected with the west African variant of the virus, which is mild compared to the central African strain, health officials said on Monday.
                          ...
                          The UK reported its first cases of monkeypox in 2018, when three people contracted the virus after a man travelled back from Nigeria.

                          Dr Skinner said there were likely to be two factors behind the international cases that have been detected in recent years.

                          “One is that the cessation of smallpox vaccination after the global eradication of variola virus in 1980 means that levels of cross-reactive immunity to monkeypox have now waned or disappeared, so that people can now be infected with monkeypox virus,” he explained.

                          “The second is the possibility that the distribution of the virus in West African wildlife has altered in some way, possibly increasing or broadening, so that humans are more likely to be infected. Investigating this possibility would require extensive testing of wildlife in the field.”

                          https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-b2080848.html
                          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                          -Nelson Mandela

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            CDC expresses concern about possibility of undetected monkeypox spread in U.K.

                            Helen Branswell
                            By Helen Branswell May 17, 2022

                            The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expressed concern Tuesday about an unusual outbreak of monkeypox in the United Kingdom, suggesting there appears to be at least some undetected transmission of the virus there and warning of the possibility that the outbreak could spread beyond U.K. borders.

                            “We do have a level of concern that this is very different than what we typically think of from monkeypox. And I think we have some concern that there could be spread outside the U.K associated with this,” Jennifer McQuiston, a senior CDC official, told STAT in an interview.
                            ...
                            McQuiston said to date the CDC has not been notified that any Americans have turned up on the UKHSA’s contact list for these cases. But she did reveal that six people in the United States are being monitored because they were on the same flight as the man who traveled from Nigeria to the U.K. on May 4. Though there’s no suggestion the individuals had direct contact with the man — they sat within a three-row radius of his seat — the six individuals will be monitored for 21 days, she said.

                            The U.K. outbreak is a reminder of the need to pay more attention to monkeypox, the disease dynamics of which are poorly understood, said Ibrahima Socé Fall, the WHO’s assistant director-general for emergency response.
                            ...
                            https://www.statnews.com/2022/05/17/...spread-in-u-k/
                            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                            -Nelson Mandela

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Monkeypox cases confirmed in England – latest updates


                              Latest updates on cases of monkeypox identified by the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA).

                              From:UK Health Security Agency
                              Published 14 May 2022

                              Last updated 18 May 2022 See all updates

                              Latest

                              Two more cases of monkeypox identified by UKHSA


                              The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has detected 2 additional cases of monkeypox, one in London and one in the South East of England.

                              The latest cases bring the total number of monkeypox cases confirmed in England since 6 May to 9, with recent cases predominantly in gay, bisexual or men who have sex with men (MSM).

                              The 2 latest cases have no travel links to a country where monkeypox is endemic, so it is possible they acquired the infection through community transmission.


                              The virus spreads through close contact and UKHSA is advising individuals, particularly those who are gay, bisexual or MSM, to be alert to any unusual rashes or lesions on any part of their body, especially their genitalia, and to contact a sexual health service if they have concerns.

                              Monkeypox has not previously been described as a sexually transmitted infection, though it can be passed on by direct contact during sex. It can also be passed on through other close contact with a person who has monkeypox or contact with clothing or linens used by a person who has monkeypox.

                              The 2 new cases do not have known connections with previous confirmed cases announced on 16, 14 and 7 May.

                              UKHSA is working closely with the NHS and other stakeholders to urgently investigate where and how recent confirmed monkeypox cases were acquired, including how they may be linked to each other.

                              The virus does not usually spread easily between people. The risk to the UK population remains low.

                              Anyone with concerns that they could be infected with monkeypox is advised to contact NHS 111 or a sexual health clinic. People should notify clinics ahead of their visit. We can assure them their call or discussion will be treated sensitively and confidentially.

                              Monkeypox is a viral infection usually associated with travel to West Africa. It is usually a mild self-limiting illness, spread by very close contact with someone with monkeypox and most people recover within a few weeks.

                              Dr Susan Hopkins, Chief Medical Adviser, UKHSA, said:
                              These latest cases, together with reports of cases in countries across Europe, confirms our initial concerns that there could be spread of monkeypox within our communities.

                              UKHSA has quickly identified cases so far and we continue to rapidly investigate the source of these infections and raise awareness among healthcare professionals.

                              We are particularly urging men who are gay and bisexual to be aware of any unusual rashes or lesions and to contact a sexual health service without delay if they have concerns. Please contact clinics ahead of your visit.

                              We are contacting any identified close contacts of the cases to provide health information and advice.


                              Clinicians should be alert to individuals presenting with rashes without a clear alternative diagnosis and should contact specialist services for advice.

                              Symptoms


                              Initial symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. A rash can develop, often beginning on the face, then spreading to other parts of the body including the genitals.

                              The rash changes and goes through different stages, and can look like chickenpox or syphilis, before finally forming a scab, which later falls off.


                              ...
                              https://www.gov.uk/government/news/m...update-history
                              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                              -Nelson Mandela

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