Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Emerg Infect Dis. Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Emerg Infect Dis. Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates

    [Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full text: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]
    Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013

    Research

    Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates


    Edgar Holznagel, Barbara Yutzy, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer, Carina Kruip, Uwe Hahmann, Pär Bierke, Juan-Maria Torres, Yong-Sun Kim, Gerhard Hunsmann, and Johannes Loewer

    Author affiliations: Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany (E. Holznagel, B. Yutzy, C. Kruip); University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany (W. Schulz-Schaeffer); German Primate Centre, Göttingen (U. Hahmann, G. Hunsmann); Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden (P. Bierke); Centro de Investigación en Sanidad Animal, Madrid, Spain (J.-M. Torres); Hallym University, Anyang, Gyeonggi-Do, South Korea (Y.-S. Kim)


    Abstract

    Risk for human exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)–inducing agent was estimated in a nonhuman primate model. To determine attack rates, incubation times, and molecular signatures, we orally exposed 18 macaques to 1 high dose of brain material from cattle with BSE. Several macaques were euthanized at regular intervals starting at 1 year postinoculation, and others were observed until clinical signs developed. Among those who received ≥5 g BSE-inducing agent, attack rates were 100% and prions could be detected in peripheral tissues from 1 year postinoculation onward. The overall median incubation time was 4.6 years (3.7–5.3). However, for 3 macaques orally exposed on multiple occasions, incubation periods were at least 7–10 years. Before clinical signs were noted, we detected a non-type 2B signature, indicating the existence of atypical prion protein during the incubation period. This finding could affect diagnosis of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and might be relevant for retrospective studies of positive tonsillectomy or appendectomy specimens because time of infection is unknown.
    -
    -------
Working...
X