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Germany ex Togo (Africa): Fatal case of Lassa fever in Cologne - confirmation of secondary cases withdrawn

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  • Germany ex Togo (Africa): Fatal case of Lassa fever in Cologne - confirmation of secondary cases withdrawn

    died patient in Cologne on Tropical Lassa fever
    March 10, 2016 3:12 am


    The Lassa fever, common in West Africa, is a dangerous viral infection. Because of the risk of infection sufferers need to be strictly isolated. In Cologne, the virus has now been detected in a patient – after his death

    A patient of the University Hospital of Cologne died on the tropical Lassa fever.. This was confirmed by the Department of the German Press Agency. According to the hospital, the patient had been referred with a diagnosis of malaria directly from Africa to Cologne.

    A few hours later he died, said spokesman Timo Mügge. On Wednesday afternoon, the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine postmortem had asked the suspected diagnosis Lassa fever. “We then immediately inform the competent authorities, with whom we are now in close coordination”, Mügge said.
    ...
    http://news.newsdirectory2.com/died-...l-lassa-fever/

    University Hospital of Cologne died patient of rare Lassa fever
    09:03:16, 22:17
    ...
    planned more information for Thursday

    The hospital did not announce whether the patient is a man or woman for the time being. For details, the University Hospital will speak only on Thursday. Throughout the day there will be a press conference with the Cologne Health Centre.
    The Lassa fever counts as Ebola and dengue haemorrhagic fevers to the so-called. The Lassa Virus can cause fever, headache, muscle pain, ecchymosis later, diarrhea and vomiting are possible. The infection can be fatal. According to the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) must be strictly isolated sufferers.
    ...
    http://www.ksta.de/koeln/uniklinik-k...orben-23697526
    Twitter: @RonanKelly13
    The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

  • #2
    American health worker dies in Cologne


    11.03.2016 COLOGNE. An American health care worker in Togo was evacuated to Cologne and died one day later from Lassa fever. Officials do not see a danger for the public.

    An American man who was a health care worker in Togo died in Cologne of Lassa Fever. He had taken ill in Togo and was flown to Cologne on February 26 for medical treatment. According to the University Clinic in Cologne, the 46-year-old man, had been diagnosed with malaria when he was evacuated from Africa.

    Lassa fever, like Ebola and Dengue fever is an acute hemorrhagic fever. University Clinic spokesperson Timo Mügge said the American patient died the day after he arrived in Cologne. It was first diagnosed after his death that he had suffered from Lassa fever.

    Health authorities say the proper precautions were taken to keep the virus from spreading when the man was transferred from Africa to Germany. Apparently, the man’s family had been doing missionary work in Togo.

    33 workers from the University Clinic and twelve health authorities who have had contact with him are being quarantined at home and are under medical supervision. Officials do not see a health danger to the public.
    Der General-Anzeiger Bonn liefert Informationen und Service rund um die Region Bonn, Rhein-Sieg-Kreis, Kreis Neuwied, Kreis Ahrweiler.
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

    Comment


    • #3

      Medical worker with suspected Lassa fever headed to Atlanta

      Friday, March 11, 2016

      An American medical worker in Africa with suspected Lassa fever will be flown to metro Atlanta for treatment this weekend.

      Upon arrival in Atlanta, an ambulance will carry the worker to Emory University Hospital, according to Channel 2 Action News.


      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

      Comment


      • #4

        Lassa Fever: 10 doctors and 23 nurses in isolation at home

        Cologne - The fear of dangerous Lassa fever - now the whole of Cologne Clinic is alarmed.


        The US doctor Todd Dekryger (46) died on 26 February in Cologne. The father of four had been infected in the African Togo. Two days ago it was revealed that it is the insidious virus is the tropical disease Lassa fever.

        Now the clinic ordered that all workers who had contact with the victim, be isolated. 10 doctors and 23 nurses are not allowed for 21 days to leave their homes. University spokesman Timo Mügge confirmed: "We have sent the staff home."


        In addition, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Wiesmüller, infectiologist of the Health Department, another twelve people have been quarantined.

        Affected are employees of Rescue aviator, the undertaker and the RTW team of professional fire service. City spokeswoman Inge Schürmann: "Twice a day takes on the health department to the isolated contact. They are asked about their health, whether they have fever. "


        Der US-Arzt Todd Dekryger (46) starb am 26. Februar in Köln. Der vierfache Vater hatte sich im afrikanischen Togo infiziert.
        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gert van der Hoek View Post
          Medical worker with suspected Lassa fever headed to Atlanta

          Friday, March 11, 2016

          An American medical worker in Africa with suspected Lassa fever will be flown to metro Atlanta for treatment this weekend.

          Upon arrival in Atlanta, an ambulance will carry the worker to Emory University Hospital, according to Channel 2 Action News.

          Emory University Hospital expects patient with suspected Lassa fever for admission to isolation unit

          Woodruff Health Sciences Center | March 11, 2016




          Emory University Hospital

          Print

          Resources »

          CDC Info on Lassa Fever

          Media Contact »

          Vince Dollard
          404-727-3366
          vdollar@emory.edu
          Holly Korschun
          404-727-3990
          hkorsch@emory.edu


          Emory University Hospital’s Serious Communicable Diseases Unit (SCDU) expects to receive a patient who may have Lassa fever. The patient’s diagnosis is not yet confirmed. Emory will work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and with the Georgia Department of Public Health in diagnosing the patient. Arrival time is not yet confirmed, however, the patient is expected to arrive via air transport this weekend.

          The patient, who due to confidentiality regulations cannot be identified, is an American physician assistant working for a missionary organization in Togo, West Africa. Emory was contacted by the U.S. State Department and asked to accept the patient in its SCDU, an isolation unit within the hospital in which four patients with Ebola virus disease were successfully treated in 2014.

          Lassa is an acute viral infection that has been prevalent in West Africa. Lassa fever is different from Ebola. Although Lassa fever and Ebola can result in similar symptoms, Lassa fever is less likely than Ebola to spread from person to person and is far less deadly. The death rate from Lassa fever is approximately 10 to 20 percent in hospitalized patients, versus approximately 70 percent in Ebola virus disease patients. While both diseases are viral hemorrhagic fevers, bleeding and severe symptoms are not common in cases of Lassa fever.

          Additional points to note about Lassa fever:
          • Lassa fever has been endemic in Africa for many years, with an estimated 100,000 to 300,000 people being infected each year.
          • It is primarily spread through direct contact with or the inhalation of droppings from "multimammate” rodents that carry the virus.
          • The virus can be transmitted by infected humans, but only through direct contact with bodily fluids. It cannot be transmitted through casual contact, and is not an airborne virus.
          According to the CDC there have been only a few cases of Lassa fever reported in the United States, the most recent being in one patient in 2015 and one patient in 2010.

          For more information on Lassa fever, visit the CDC website at:http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/lassa/

          http://news.emory.edu/stories/2016/0...er/campus.html

          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6


            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savanes_Region,_Togo


            Translation Google

            Togo An American who died of Lassa virus buried Saturday at Mango

            iciLome | Sunday, 13 March 2016 11:56 |

            An American resident of Mango died of Lassa fever after autopsy made in Germany. He was buried Saturday in Mango.

            It's an American missionary surgeon. He works at Baptist Hospital of Mango. While rumors report a death to the Lassa virus or meningitis, a German hospital revealed the real cause of the death of the missionary.

            After autopsy, the missionary died of Lassa virus. More worrying, the nurse who attended him would be currently sick. After autopsy, his body was repatriated to Togo and was buried Saturday in Mango. This appearance of the Lassa virus disease should concern the Togolese authorities to take appropriate measures necessary to avoid the worst in people. A.G

            http://news.icilome.com/?idnews=820150
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7

              See also:

              GA: Suspected Lassa fever patient coming to Emory from Togo-diagnosis confirmed

              https://flutrackers.com/forum/forum/...osis-confirmed

              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Translation Google

              TOGO -
              Lethal Weapon against Lassa

              03/14/2016

              Lethal Weapon against Lassa effective antiviral treatment

              The Lassa fever threatens the town of Mango (592 km from Lomé). 84 patients have been identified in recent days; they are under close supervision. The Togo-Benin border crossing point in the area is the subject of special attention on the part of officials of the Ministry of Health. The virus indeed came from Benin.
              ...

              http://www.republicoftogo.com/Toutes...e-contre-Lassa
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #9
                Not good. The mortician in Germany who handled his body has become infected:

                Published Date: 2016-03-16 22:07:44
                Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Lassa fever - West Africa (14): Germany (RP) local transmission, mortician
                Archive Number: 20160316.4098169
                LASSA FEVER - WEST AFRICA (14): GERMANY (RHINELAND-PALATINATE) LOCAL TRANSMISSION, MORTICIAN
                ************************************************** ******************************************
                A ProMED-mail post
                http://www.promedmail.org
                ProMED-mail is a program of the
                International Society for Infectious Diseases
                http://www.isid.org

                Date: 16 Mar 2016
                Source: Der Spiegel [in German, mach. trans. edited]
                http://www.spiegel.de/gesundheit/dia...a-1082716.html


                A patient infected with the Lassa fever virus has been admitted to the special isolation unit of the Frankfurt University Hospital. The individual works at a funeral home in Alzey (Rheinland-Pfalz). He had contact with the body of an individual who died in the Cologne University Hospital at the end of February 2016. The deceased had been in contact with Lassa patients in Togo according to the county government Alzey-Worms.

                After the Lassa virus was detected in the blood of the funeral employee, he was admitted to the Frankfurt University Hospital immediately: "It would be the 1st case of Lassa virus infection acquired in German," [see comment below] said virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg.

                Lassa fever is known as one of the hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola and dengue haemorrhagic fevers. The pathogen can cause fever, headache, muscle pain, ecchymosis, and later, diarrhea and vomiting. In severe cases, it can lead to a state of shock, which can lead to organ failure.

                According to the Robert Koch Institute, the infection is often mild or without symptoms. According to estimates, 100 000 to 300 000 people are infected each year with the virus, of which one or 2 percent die from the illness. There are no vaccinations to prevent the disease.

                In Germany, 6 imported cases have been reported since 1974. The most recent was a US citizen who died on [26 Feb 2016] in Cologne, who had worked in Togo as a nurse. Only several days after his death was the Lassa virus infection detected.

                The body of the American was brought on [3 Mar 2016] in a special container to Alzey, where it was to be prepared for further transport to Togo, said the county government of Alzey. Six days later, on [9 Mar 2016], the diagnosis of Lassa fever was made at the Cologne University Hospital.

                Then, the employees were taken and tested for life-threatening diseases by the Frankfurt competence center. The 1st so-called zero-sample of [10 Mar 2016] showed no evidence of the virus. A 2nd specimen on Tue [15 Mar 2016] was positive for the Lassa fever virus.

                The employees of the funeral home had only one contact with the dead body, according to the county government. By his own account, the infected mortician said that he did not come into contact with body fluids.

                Although the man's family members did not show any symptoms, they were also hospitalized.

                The Frankfurt University Hospital aims to report on Thursday [17 Mar 2016] in a press conference about the case.

                --

                Comment


                • #10
                  Confirmed Lassa virus infection in three contacts

                  A total of three contacts of the patient who died end of February 2016 at the Cologne University Hospital from Lassa fever have been diagnosed in the meantime. All are under observation. The on Lassa fever deceased worked for a humanitarian organization in Togo and was infected there. The now suffering from Lassa fever and to be regarded as secondary cases patients had in the period from late February to early March 2016 Contact the body of the patient. You are currently on isolation wards in Dusseldorf and Frankfurt. In all three affected an inquiry carried out due to an incipient symptoms blood investigation did on 15 or 17 March, the diagnosis of Lassa virus infection. On the isolation wards, patients can be optimally supplied and without risk for the treated medical staff and prescribed medication. The contacts of the three patients are closely monitored.

                  Although quite possible human-to-human transmission of Lassa fever in particular in the medical and nursing context in Africa, which now occurred in Germany transfers are unusual. The circumstances of the transfers are currently being investigated. In previous cases, no secondary diseases were among the many contacts of treated outside Africa Lassa fever cases become known, although late diagnosed this partly as Lassa fever cases and appropriate protective measures were therefore not always adhered to throughout. However, an asymptomatic remaining probable secondary infection was documented in Germany ever retrospective.

                  In further contacts of patients who died from Togo, the maximum incubation period of Lassa fever (21 days) start after their last contact with the patient in the next few days. They are under observation and would be included immediately upon the occurrence of disease symptoms in an isolation ward. None of contact person is known from an infection risk for the population. Lassa virus-infected can transmit only with the entry of symptoms the infection to others. Detailed information i.a. to infection routes, symptoms and diagnosis of Lassa fever RKI guide for physicians are available on the.

                  Unlike the flown out from Togo patient who was already seriously ill when he arrived in Cologne, are now sick early on optimal medical treatment in Germany. The proportion of fatal courses is at Lassa fever significantly lower than about Ebola fever.

                  Stand: 03.18.2016
                  Bei insgesamt drei Kontaktpersonen des Ende Februar 2016 in der Kölner Uniklinik verstorbenen Lassafieber-Patienten sind inzwischen Lassavirus-Infektionen diagnostiziert worden. Sie befinden sich derzeit auf Isolierstationen in Düsseldorf und Frankfurt.
                  “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                  Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                  ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Lassa virus infection in contacts of the deceased in Cologne not confirmed

                    When two contacts of the end of February 2016 at the Cologne University Hospital Lassa fever patients, the Lassa virus infection has not been confirmed. The on Lassa fever deceased worked for a humanitarian organization in Togo and was infected there. In a blood test at a contact person on March 15, the diagnosis of Lassa infection had been detected, so that the patient was brought immediately performed with appropriate precautions to the isolation ward of the University Hospital Frankfurt.

                    The first regarded as the second and third secondary case and recorded in the isolation ward in Dusseldorf patients had in the period from late February to early March 2016 Contact the body of the patient. They had also been under observation. For them carried out due to an incipient symptoms blood test on March 17, had revealed the diagnosis of Lassa virus infection. The original positive finding has now been withdrawn because the findings could not be confirmed, as the University Hospital Dusseldorf notified on 19 March (www.uniklinik-duesseldorf.de).

                    In an isolation ward patients can be optimally supplied and without risk for the treated medical staff and prescribed medication. The contact persons of such patients should be closely observed.

                    Although well happen in Africa particularly in the medical and nursing context human-to-human transmission of Lassa fever, which occurred in Germany transmission is uncommon. The circumstances surrounding the transfer are under investigation. In previous cases, no secondary diseases were among the many contacts of treated outside Africa Lassa fever cases become known, although late diagnosed this partly as Lassa fever cases and appropriate protective measures were therefore not always adhered to throughout. However, an asymptomatic remaining probable secondary infection was documented in Germany ever retrospective.

                    In further contacts of patients who died from Togo, the maximum incubation period of Lassa fever (21 days) start after their last contact with the patient in the next few days. They are under observation and would be included immediately upon the occurrence of disease symptoms in an isolation ward. None of contact person is known from an infection risk for the population. Lassa virus-infected can transmit only with the entry of symptoms the infection to others. Detailed information i.a. to infection routes, symptoms and diagnosis of Lassa fever RKI guide for physicians are available on the.

                    Unlike the flown out from Togo patient who was already seriously ill when he arrived in Cologne, is the sick early on optimal medical treatment in Germany. The proportion of fatal courses is at Lassa fever significantly lower than about Ebola fever.

                    Stand: 03.19.2016
                    Bei zwei Kontaktpersonen des Ende Februar 2016 in der Kölner Uniklinik verstorbenen Lassafieber-Patienten hat sich die Lassavirus-Infektion nicht bestätigt.
                    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Current information: Lassa fever not confirmed

                      Dusseldorf - 19:03:16


                      As (18/03/2016) has been reported yesterday, a positive result was detected in two contact persons of the Cologne-Lassa patients on Lassa fever. The Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine has these positive findings today withdrawn after evaluation of retests of virological examination in these patients morning because "could not be confirmed on Lassa fever the original findings."

                      The two patients are still in the special isolation of the University Hospital Dusseldorf. They are valid as long as suspected cases until the end of the incubation period is reached. Patients will continue to be monitored in the station. Their health remains stable.
                      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Source: http://www.who.int/csr/don/23-march-...er-germany/en/

                        Lassa Fever – Germany

                        Disease outbreak news
                        23 March 2016

                        Between 10 and 16 March 2016, the National IHR Focal Point for Germany notified WHO/EURO of 2 cases of Lassa fever.
                        Details of the cases

                        • The first case was a medical health care worker evacuated to Cologne, Germany from Togo on 25 February for treatment of complicated falciparum malaria. The patient passed away on 26 February following multi-organ failure. Autopsy findings were suggestive of haemorrhagic fever, and Lassa fever diagnosis was confirmed on 9 March at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg, Germany.
                        • The secondary case is a funeral home employee who handled the primary case’s corpse on 2 March. The patient is reported to have worn gloves and does not recall being exposed to bodily fluids. Following the primary case’s diagnosis, he had been under home quarantine since 9 March. He already had had symptoms of an upper respiratory infection when he had contact with the corpse. Symptoms waxed and waned over the following days. The first laboratory test for Lassa fever on 10 March was negative by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When symptoms persisted, diagnostics were repeated and Lassa fever infection was confirmed by PCR on 15 March. The patient has been transported to a special isolation unit in Frankfurt. He has no history of travel in the 21 days prior to the illness. Four of his family members have voluntarily agreed to be quarantined in the same isolation unit. Further investigations are ongoing.

                        Public health response

                        Following laboratory confirmation of Lassa fever in the index case, 52 contacts have been identified and are currently under follow up. All contacts are either health care personnel or funeral home employees. For 38 of these contacts, the maximum incubation period (21 days) expired on 19 March. All contacts of the secondary case are also being followed up.
                        WHO risk assessment

                        Cases of Lassa fever have already been imported from West Africa to Europe. However, it is the first time that secondary transmission of the infection is reported in Europe. Risk for further transmission of Lassa fever in Germany is considered to be low and limited to hospital settings caring for the cases, with all contacts accounted for and monitored. WHO continues to monitor the epidemiological situation and conduct risk assessments based on the latest available information.
                        WHO advice

                        The secondary case identified in Germany underlines the need for all countries to ensure the application of standard infection prevention and control precautions when caring for patients, regardless of their presumed diagnosis. These include basic hand hygiene, respiratory hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (to block splashes or other contact with infected materials), safe injection practices and safe burial practices.
                        WHO does not recommend any restriction of travel and trade to Germany based on the information available.


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