Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Respiratory illness - adenovirus 14 -hits remote Alaska island - FluTrackers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Respiratory illness - adenovirus 14 -hits remote Alaska island - FluTrackers

    Source: http://www.ktuu.com/Global/story.asp?S=9116462

    Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

    by Angela Blanchard
    Thursday, October 1, 2008

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska-- The State Health Department and U.S. Centers for Disease Control are investigating an outbreak of a respiratory illness on Prince of Whales Island.

    Health department officials are reporting 26 suspected or confirmed cases of the unknown illness in communities like Craig and Klawock.

    Officials say seven people have been hospitalized.

    Symptoms of the illness include a severe dry cough and a fever above 101 degrees.


    The health department says so far the state is not prohibiting travel to and from the island or quarantining anyone but is advising people to practice good respiratory hygiene.

    "Basically you can go a long way with just washing your hands meticulously and covering your cough and using tissues and throwing them away," Medical Epidemiologist Dr. Beth Funk said. "Don't leave them lying around, just sort of simple things like that."

    The health department is collecting samples and sending them to the CDC, as well as testing samples in an Anchorage lab.

    Contact Angela Blanchard at ablanchard@ktuu.com

  • #2
    Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

    From the Prince of Wales Chamber of Commerce web site:

    Prince of Wales Chamber of Commerce
    "Welcome to America's Third Largest Island"
    Located in Southern Southeast Alaska . . . .

    WILDLIFE --

    Sitka black tailed deer and black bear are the primary game animals, and the island supports several packs of wolves. Moose have been spotted on Prince of Wales. While the streams and lakes contain a variety of trout, most people fish the salt water for the five species of salmon, or for halibut, red snapper, and other bottom fish. Eagles are a common sight and waterfowl abound during the nesting season. Several species spend the winter in the area including the trumpeter swan.

    http://www.princeofwalescoc.org/climate.html
    http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

      It's the beginning of RSV season here.

      See chart at http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/id/do...sultsGraph.pdf

      We had a cooler summer, so cases could arrive a little early.

      .
      "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

        Originally posted by AlaskaDenise View Post
        It's the beginning of RSV season here.

        See chart at http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/id/do...sultsGraph.pdf

        We had a cooler summer, so cases could arrive a little early.

        .
        Any confirmation? Some sources are raising more serious issues.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

          http://plumbot.com/Craig,_Alaska.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

            Interesting radio interview done on 9/4/08 npr KCAW-FM (Raven Radio).
            http://kcaw.org/modules/local_news/i...p?op=se&page=2

            Wrangell doctor reaches four corners of POW by Lisa Phu

            WRANGELL, ALASKA (2008-09-04) For almost ten years, Wrangell doctor Dave McCandless has been holding rural clinics in communities on Prince of Wales Island that don't have health providers and don't have easy access to them. It started when Point Baker and Port Protection asked Wrangell to send a visiting doctor. Since then, every six weeks throughout the entire year, Dr. McCandless visits the remote communities of Coffman Cove, Whale Pass, Naukati, Edna Bay, Point Baker, and Port Protection.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

              Originally posted by niman View Post
              Any confirmation? Some sources are raising more serious issues.
              I just talked to the state epidemiology dept. in Anchorage (friday noon local time).

              There is still no diagnosis. They have sent a team to the island to collect additional specimens. As soon as they have results they will be released to the media.

              They have been getting calls from a wide area - including media, rumor-checkers, etc.

              When I suggested RSV, she said it is on their list. WHen I suggested bird flu, her response was that the state had been testing birds around the state, so they doubt that is what it is. However, she agreed that the symptoms are flu-like.

              So....we wait.

              I nomally listen to our in-state NPR station all day, so the minute I hear anything, I'll post it here.

              I hope there's nothing in swans, as pacific-flyway swans flew through here last week. During their southward migration, species will "mix" at busy migratory bottlenecks - the perfect opportunity to trade pathogens. This theory has been proposed by our in-state migratory bird experts - that AI pathogens would most likely be passed from asymptomatic carriers to more sensitive species as they begin their flight south.

              We got our first snow this morning, so it will probably convince any remaining migratory birds to leave the more populated areas here in southcentral Alaska. THere are many water bodies within populated areas, so pathogens in birds could impact many people. I have 5 lakes within a one mile radius of my home - very typical.

              .
              "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                Prince of Wales Island is at the extreme southern end of SE Alaska - just north of Prince Rupert, British Columbia and west of Ketchikan, AK. see map:

                Click image for larger version

Name:	POW island.gif
Views:	2
Size:	67.4 KB
ID:	649229
                "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                  Migratory bird hunting on POW Island as evidenced by the number of Migratory Bird Hunting registered guides. Five guides specify their guiding locations as POW Island, while some specify all of SE Alaska.

                  see: http://www.wildlifenews.alaska.gov/h...k/wfguides.pdf

                  One hunter gives his business address as Craig, AK. Seven guides are allowed to guide in that Management Unit (#2).

                  I hope we're not seeing an event related to the swans, poultry and soldier in Japan & South Korea last April. (and Kamchatka in June)

                  See: http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04...pan_Swans.html

                  .
                  "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                    Haida of BC, CHarlotte Islands left up-north

                    Klawock, Alaska

                    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


                    Jump to: navigation, search
                    <!-- start content --><TABLE class="infobox geography vcard" style="WIDTH: 23em; TEXT-ALIGN: left"><TBODY><TR><TD style="FONT-SIZE: 1.25em; WIDTH: 100%; WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" align=middle colSpan=2>City of Klawock, Alaska</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TD class=maptable style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0.4em; PADDING-TOP: 0.4em" align=middle colSpan=2><TABLE style="BACKGROUND: none transparent scroll repeat 0% 0%; WIDTH: 100%" align=center><TBODY><TR><TD style="VERTICAL-ALIGN: middle" align=middle colSpan=2>

                    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TD align=middle colSpan=2>Nickname(s): Site of the First Salmon Cannery in Alaska</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TD align=middle colSpan=2>Motto: kla-na-kee-duk</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TD style="TEXT-ALIGN: center" colSpan=2>
                    <SMALL>Location in the state of Alaska</SMALL>
                    </TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TD align=middle colSpan=2>
                    City of Klawock, Alaska




                    <SMALL>Location in the state of Alaska</SMALL>
                    </TD></TR><TR class=mergedbottomrow><TH style="FONT-SIZE: smaller; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0.7em; TEXT-ALIGN: center" colSpan=2>Coordinates: 55&#176;33′18″N 133&#176;5′7″W / 55.555, -133.08528</TH></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TH>Country</TH><TH>United States</TH></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>State</TH><TH>Alaska</TH></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>Borough</TH><TH>Unorganized</TH></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>Founded</TH><TD>1868</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>Incorporated</TH><TD>1929</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TD colSpan=2>Government</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Mayor</TH><TD>Donald Marvin</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TD colSpan=2>Area</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Total</TH><TD>0.9 sq mi (2.3 km&#178</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Land</TH><TD>0.6 sq mi (1.5 km&#178</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Water</TH><TD>0.3 sq mi (0.8 km&#178 34.83%</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TD>Elevation</TD><TD>79 ft (24 m)</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TD colSpan=2>Population (2000)</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Total</TH><TD>854</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>- Density</TH><TD>1,465.4/sq mi (568.5/km&#178</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TH>Time zone</TH><TD>AKST (UTC-9)</TD></TR><TR class=mergedbottomrow><TH style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap">- Summer (DST)</TH><TD>AKDT (UTC-8)</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TH>Zip code</TH><TD>99925</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>Area code(s)</TH><TD>907</TD></TR><TR class=mergedtoprow><TH>FIPS code</TH><TD>02-40400</TD></TR><TR class=mergedrow><TH>GNIS feature ID</TH><TD>1423100</TD></TR><TR><TD class=mergedtoprow style="TEXT-ALIGN: center" colSpan=2>Website: WWW.CityOfKlawock.Com</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Klawock is a city in Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island, on Klawock Inlet, across from Klawock Island. The population was 854 at the 2000 census.
                    It is 90 km (56 mi) from Ketchikan, 11 km (seven mi) from Craig, and 39 km (24 mi) from Hollis.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                      UNDIAGNOSED RESPIRATORY ILLNESS - USA: (ALASKA), REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
                      ************************************************** **********************
                      A ProMED-mail post
                      <http://www.promedmail.org>
                      ProMED-mail is a program of the
                      International Society for Infectious Diseases
                      <http://www.isid.org>

                      Date: Thu 2 Oct 2008
                      Source: KTUU.com, Alaska [edited]
                      <http://www.ktuu.com/Global/story.asp?S=9116462>


                      Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island
                      ---------------------------------------------
                      The Alaska State Health Department and US Centers for Disease Control
                      (CDC) are investigating an outbreak of a respiratory illness on
                      Prince of Wales Island.

                      Health department officials are reporting 26 suspected or confirmed
                      cases of the unknown illness in communities like Craig and Klawock.
                      Officials say 7 people have been hospitalized.

                      Symptoms of the illness include a severe dry cough and a fever above
                      101 [deg F / 38.3 deg C].

                      The health department says so far the state is not prohibiting travel
                      to and from the island or quarantining anyone, but is advising people
                      to practice good respiratory hygiene. "Basically you can go a long
                      way [towards preventing spread] with just washing your hands
                      meticulously and covering your cough, and using tissues and throwing
                      them away," medical epidemiologist Dr Beth Funk said. "Don't leave
                      them [used tissues] lying around, just sort of simple things like
                      that."

                      The health department is collecting samples and sending them to the
                      CDC, as well as testing samples in an Anchorage lab.

                      [Byline: Angela Blanchard]

                      --
                      Communicated by:
                      ProMED-mail
                      <promed@promedmail.org>
                      & Randolph Kruger

                      [It is extremely unusual for no provisional diagnosis to be given for
                      an outbreak in the USA, let alone for fever and cough at this time of
                      year in Alaska. I wonder why they don't suspect influenza A or some
                      such seasonal pathogen. How can there be confirmed cases when they
                      don't know what the cause is? Any further information will be
                      welcome.

                      PRINCE OF WALES ISLAND, USA: 2231 sq mi (5,778 sq km), off SE Alaska;
                      largest island of the Alexander Archipelago. The island is heavily
                      forested, but has little arable land, no source of freshwater, and no
                      available areas for ship docking. Many of the islanders left when the
                      pearl-shell industry, once profitable, declined after the 1950s -- see
                      <http://www.questia.com/
                      library/encyclopedia/prince-of-wales-island-united-states.jsp>.

                      Craig's population has varied following trends in the commercial
                      fishing industry. As of the census of 2000, the population was 1397.
                      The population of Klawock was 854 at the 2000 census (Source:
                      Wikipedia.com). - Mod.JW

                      The US state of Alaska can be located on HealthMap/ProMED-mail
                      interactive map at
                      <http://healthmap.org/promed?g=5879092&v=64,-150,3>.
                      Prince of Wales Island is one of the islands of the Alexander
                      Archipelago, just west of the northern half of the Canadian province
                      of British Columbia. It can be seen at
                      <http://healthmap.org/promed?g=5844324&v=55.666,-132.083,8>. - CopyEd.MJ]

                      [see also:
                      2006
                      ----
                      Undiagnosed illness - USA (IA): RFI 20061208.3470
                      2002
                      ----
                      Undiagnosed illness, hotel - USA (New Jersey) (02) 20020214.3560
                      2001
                      ----
                      Undiagnosed illness - USA (Wyoming) 20010603.1091
                      2000
                      ---
                      Undiagnosed illness - USA (California) 20000914.1575]
                      ........................................jw/mj/jw

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                        ProMed may say there's no areas for ship docking, but there is in nearby Ketchikan - a major stop for the many cruise ships going through SE Alaska. The last ships leave Whittier/Seward about September 20th - then proceed south. Those cruise ship passengers and crew (from many foreign countries) typically bring out-of-season flu here in summer. People from Craig & Klawock could easily have been employees of the tourism industry - although I"d expect any of their illnesses to also infect Ketchikan.

                        .
                        "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                          History

                          Originally, Craig's townsite was a temporary fishing camp, used for gathering herring eggs.<SUP id=cite_ref-FS-PoW-C_8-0 class=reference>[9]</SUP>
                          <SUP></SUP>
                          Craig was named after Craig Miller <SMALL>(alternate spelling: Millar)</SMALL> who established a fish saltery on nearby Fish Egg Island in 1907<SUP id=cite_ref-FS-PoW-C_8-1 class=reference>[9]</SUP> with the assistance of the local Haida natives who moved onto Prince of Wales Island from Haida Gwaii (British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands) starting in the 1700s.<SUP id=cite_ref-NOAA-AFSC-C_2-3 class=reference>[3]</SUP><SUP id=cite_ref-9 class=reference>[10]</SUP>

                          Craig Miller constructed a cold storage plant and packing company at the present site of Craig,<SUP id=cite_ref-NOAA-AFSC-C_2-4 class=reference>[3]</SUP> and in 1922 was instrumental in the incorporation of the city (originally as an Alaska second-class<SUP id=cite_ref-AK-FS_7-1 class=reference>[8]</SUP> city within the Alaska Territory, pre-statehood).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                            Per ProMed:

                            How can there be confirmed cases when they
                            don't know what the cause is?
                            .
                            "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Respiratory illness hits remote Alaska island

                              Commentary

                              http://www.recombinomics.com/News/10...PoW_Alert.html

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X