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  • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

    Bird flu cases rise in Egypt

    3rd April 2009

    In Egypt, the number of bird flu cases has risen yet again to 61, making six new human infections over the past month.
    Egypt is the most populous Arab country and the one hit hardest by bird flu outside Asia.

    A two-year-old boy from the province of Bohaira, in the north, is believed to have become infected after coming into contact with poultry carrying the disease.

    The boy was taken to hospital earlier this week after coming down with a fever during a family visit, where he was treated with the drug Tamiflu.

    Even though it is recommended by experts, health authorities in Egypt do not compensate farmers for birds that need to be culled.

    In the last six years, at least 410 people have contracted the H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    The infections have occurred in 15 countries and caused 254 human deaths, and entailed the culling of some 300 million birds in 61 countries.

    The human dead include 23 Egyptians, contact with domestic birds carrying the virus being the most common infection route.

    In Egypt, where approximately 5 million households derive their main source of food and income from domestic poultry, comparatively few people have been infected.

    This recent case comes just over one week after a two-year-old girl in the province of Qena was found to have contracted the virus.

    One day after the girl's symptoms began, she was moved to a hospital specialising in treating the disease and given the drug oseltamivir. Her condition eventually stabilised.

    Cases in Egypt have been sporadic, and just over one third have been fatal.

    However, experts fear that the H5N1 virus could become transmissible from one human to another, bringing devastating consequences worldwide.

    The virus responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, which killed somewhere between 20 and 50 million people worldwide, was less deadly than a potentially mutated H5N1 bird flu virus.

    Billions of dollars are currently being spent by governments in preparation for a potential outbreak, and at least 17 governments and 12 companies are developing bird flu vaccines.


    http://www.hc2d.co.uk/content.php?contentId=10853
    Last edited by AlaskaDenise; April 18, 2009, 02:12 AM. Reason: remove photo

    Comment


    • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

      Flying in the face of challenge

      According to a World Health Organisation report, Egypt is on the front line in the battle against avian flu. Reem Leila examines the threat
      <HR noShade><!-- STORY -->Two-year-old Israa Saad Abdel-Shafi is the 60th case of the H5N1 strain of avian flu virus recorded in Egypt since the first outbreak of the disease in 2006 and the ninth victim since the start of the year. Twenty-three out of the 60 have died, the majority young girls or women from rural areas who raise fowl domestically.
      In early March the World Health Organisation (WHO) called for an investigation into why Egypt is seeing increasing numbers of victims. The WHO has identified the country as being at the forefront of the spread of the disease though Abdel-Rahman Shahin, official spokesman to the Ministry of Health, points out that despite the high number of victims the percentage of fatalities from bird flu in Egypt is still less than in other countries that have seen outbreaks of the disease.
      Egypt has reported nine cases since the beginning of the year, with zero fatalities. There were eight cases with four fatalities in 2008. Vietnam has reported two fatalities, and China seven victims with four fatalities. Shahin argues the figures indicate the disease is being controlled in Egypt.
      "This year we do not have any fatalities whereas last year it was 50 per cent. The fatality rate in China this year is more than 50 per cent, and in Vietnam it is 100 per cent. The situation in Egypt is improving, not deteriorating."
      Bird flu presents a massive challenge to the government given the uncertainty about the course of any possible pandemic. The virus has become endemic and it could take years to rid the country of the most virulent strain. The government, says Shahin, has prepared a detailed national plan to be implemented in case of a pandemic according to which half of Egypt's 150,000 hospitals beds will be reserved for avian flu patients.
      Hamid Samaha, head of the General Authority for Veterinary Services, says the government is focussing on comprehensive public health efforts -- monitoring outbreaks in order to identify any change in the virus, increasing anti-viral stockpiles and building a more robust capacity for vaccine production.
      Settlement patterns in Egypt, where 95 per cent of the population is concentrated on five per cent of the land, has serious implications for any pandemic outbreak. The virus has been found at nearly 300 sites and is now "rooted in the Egyptian environment" says Shahin, who now believes that following the first incidents of avian flu Egypt should have culled all poultry and taken draconian measures to stamp out the continued domestic rearing of birds.
      "The whole country must resort to consuming frozen chicken instead of purchasing fresh birds. We cannot afford to implement such a scheme at the moment, but the least we must do is ensure that in cities people abide by the regulations and limit direct and indirect communication with poultry."
      Shahin suggests the mortality rate resulting from bird flu infections is decreasing due to growing awareness in the wake of information campaigns conducted by the Ministry of Health.
      The WHO is still concerned that human infections have escalated over a relatively short period of time, leading some experts to accuse the government of inadequate planning. Health officials, they say, are endeavouring to enforce preventive measures but are incapable of ensuring they are strictly implemented.
      "Government planning is random. It is using the wrong vaccine to combat the virus," insists Talaat Khatib, professor of veterinary medicine at Assiut University. "American scientists have already confirmed the H5N1 virus has evolved into two genetically distinct strains, potentially increasing the risk to humans." Khatib believes public awareness campaigns to date have been too weak and Egypt should have begun to plan its preventative measures when the virus was first reported in the country in February 2006.
      In Egypt, where poverty and illiteracy rates are high and urban rooftop and backyard rearing of poultry has long been a way of life, a more systematic approach to monitoring the disease needs to be put in place, says Samaha. "People do not respect instructions from the authorities. They consider poultry capital for which it is worth risking their health, and the health of their neighbours."
      Egypt is one of very few countries affected by bird flu that does not offer compensation to farmers when poultry is destroyed. Since 2003 412 human cases of the virus have been reported in 15 countries, resulting in 256 deaths. More than 300 million birds have been culled worldwide.

      http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2009/941/eg6.htm

      Comment


      • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

        [WARNING: Google Machine Translation from Arabic to English. Readers can find original article at http://www.egynews.net/wps/portal/!u...18332595300029 - EDITED.[

        Ministry of Health announces bird flu infection 62 Behira


        The Egyptian Ministry of Health Friday, wounding a child maintain the lake with bird flu, bringing the number of Egyptians who have been infected with bird flu for 62.

        The ministry said in a statement that the emergence of symptoms of the disease on the child, Jamil Hassan Mohammed Hassan (in 9 months) started in the first of April, and was admitted into hospital Damanhour Center, and treated with [tamiflu] on the same day he entered the hospital, where the child is still in good health and receive treatment.

        23 Egyptians killed after HIV infection, including many cases involving domestic poultry infected with, and adopt some five million Egyptian poultry house as a major source of food and income.

        The virus / H .5. The. / 1 strain of bird flu at least 410 people since 2003 in 15 countries and killed 254 of them, and led to death or forcing the authorities to the execution of more than 300 million birds in 61 countries in Asia and the Middle East and Africa and Europe.

        (MENA)
        -
        -----

        Comment


        • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

          Reuters AlertNet - Egyptian toddler contracts bird flu virus
          Egyptian toddler contracts bird flu virus

          03 Apr 2009 17:20:09 GMT
          Source: Reuters
          CAIRO, April 3 (Reuters) -

          An Egyptian toddler has contracted the highly pathogenic bird flu virus, the latest in an upswing of cases in the most populous Arab country, state news agency MENA said on Friday.


          The case brings to 62 the number of confirmed cases of the H5N1 avian flu virus in Egypt, which has been hit harder by bird flu than any other country outside of Asia and has reported seven human infections since March 1.

          The 21-month-old boy, Hassan Gamil Hassan Mohamed, is from the province of Beheira in northern Egypt and was in a "good" condition after being treated with the antiviral drug Tamiflu, MENA reported.

          The new infection came several days after a two-year-old boy from the same province contracted the virus.

          MENA did not say how Mohamed contracted the virus, but most Egyptians who have fallen ill with bird flu are believed to have contracted the virus from infected household birds.

          Egypt is one of the few countries affected by bird flu that does not compensate farmers when poultry is destroyed, though many experts say this is the best way to ensure the rapid detection of new outbreaks.

          Since 2003 the H5N1 avian influenza virus has infected at least 410 people in 15 countries and killed 254 of them. It has killed or forced the culling of more than 300 million birds in 61 countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

          Some 23 Egyptians have died after contracting the virus, most after coming into contact with infected domestic birds in a country where roughly 5 million households depend on domestically raised poultry as a significant source of food and income.

          While H5N1 rarely infects people, experts say they fear it could mutate into a form that people could easily pass to one another, sparking a pandemic that could kill millions.

          (Writing by Cynthia Johnston)
          -
          <cite cite="http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L3635901.htm">Reuters AlertNet - Egyptian toddler contracts bird flu virus</cite>

          Comment


          • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

            Update map

            http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...2,3.378296&z=8

            Comment


            • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

              Commentary

              http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04...Beheira_2.html

              Comment


              • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                Egyptian toddler contracts bird flu


                <!-- end: .tools --><!-- end: .hd --><CITE class=caption>AFP/File – An Egyptian butcher washes chicken after slaughtering them in 2008. An Egyptian toddler has contracted … </CITE>

                <!-- end #main-media -->
                <!-- end .primary-media -->
                <!-- end .related-media --><ABBR class=recenttimedate title=2009-04-03T10:55:39-0700>45 mins ago</ABBR>
                <!-- end .byline -->CAIRO (AFP) – An Egyptian toddler has contracted bird flu, the 62nd recorded case since the first outbreak of the disease in the country in 2006 and the second this week, state-news agency MENA reported on Friday.
                Hassan Gamil Hassan, 21 months old, was hospitalised on Wednesday in the northern province of Beheira with a higher fever, MENA quoted the health ministry as saying.
                A two-year-old was taken to hospital in Beheira on Monday. He had been exposed to dead fowl thought to have been infected with the virus.
                Twenty-three people have died of bird flu in Egypt. Most of the victims have been young girls or women, who are generally in charge of looking after poultry in rural areas.
                The World Health Organisation (WHO) called last month for an investigation into why many of the victims have been young children.
                Egypt hosted an international conference on bird flu in October, when Washington pledged an additional 320 million dollars to the fight against the disease amid fears it may yet escalate into a global pandemic.
                The H5N1 strain of the virus that is most dangerous to humans first emerged in Asia in 2003 and has since caused nearly 250 deaths, according to WHO figures.
                Scientists fear that a mutation of the bird flu virus resulting in a strain easily transmitted among humans could create a pandemic, potentially affecting up to one-fifth of the world's population.
                http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090403...egypthealthflu
                Last edited by AlaskaDenise; April 18, 2009, 02:13 AM. Reason: remove photo

                Comment


                • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                  Earlier case:

                  New confirmed human case of avian influenza in Egypt (case no. 60)
                  Reported on 26 March 2009
                  The Ministry of Health and Population of Egypt has reported a new confirmed human case of avian influenza (case no. 60) on 26 March 2009. The new case is a two and a half year old female from Qena district, Qena governorate. Her symptoms began on 23 March and she was hospitalized in Qena Fever Hospital on the 24 March. The child received treatment with Tamiflu on the same day of hospitalization. Infection with H5N1 avian influenza was confirmed by the Egyptian Central Public Health Laboratory on 26 March and the patient was referred to Manshet El Bakry Hospital in Cairo on the same day.

                  Investigations into the source of infection indicate a history of close contact with dead and sick poultry prior to becoming ill. The child?s condition is now improving and she is stable.

                  This brings the total number of human confirmed cases of avian influenza in Egypt up to 60 with 23 deaths.

                  http://www.emro.who.int/index.asp

                  Comment


                  • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                    Commentary

                    A Second H5N1 Confirmed Toddler In Beheira Egypt This Week
                    Recombinomics Commentary 19:08
                    April 3, 2009

                    The 21-month-old boy, Hassan Gamil Hassan Mohamed, is from the province of Beheira in northern Egypt and was in a "good" condition

                    The above comments describe the second confirmed H5N1 toddler from Beheira this week (see updated map). There have been 11 confirmed H5N1 cases in Egypt in 2009, and 10 of the 11 have been toddlers. To date, none have died, and only one of the 11 cases was initially described as critical. Instead these cases have been mild and do not appear to involve pneumonia. The lone adult case was only symptomatic for four days.

                    The high frequency and concentration of patients between the ages of 1 &#189; and 2 &#189; once again raises concerns that prior outbreaks involved large number of victims who developed protective immunity. Consequently, almost all bird flu cases this year involve toddlers. In the prior three years, only 6 of 51 confirmed cases were toddlers. In 2009 the number is 10/11.

                    The high number of H5N1 confirmed toddlers in 2009 is an increasing cause for concern.


                    .
                    "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                    Comment


                    • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                      Commentary

                      http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04...ler_Alarm.html

                      Comment


                      • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                        The resurgence of bird flu in Egypt


                        الإصابة الـ ٦۲ بانفلونزا الطيور لطفل من محافظة البحيرة
                        Infection of bird flu to 62 children from the province of the lake



                        Updated 03.04.2009 17:01:44 UTC

                        Updated 03.04.2009 17:01:44 UTC




                        أصيب طفل يدعى حسن جميل حسن محمد يبلغ من العمر عاما و۹ أشهر، من مديرية التحرير مركز بدر بمحافظة البحيرة، بمرض إنفلونزا الطيور، ليصبح الحالة رقم (٦۲) في مصر.


                        Old child, Hasan Jamil Hassan Mohammed, a year-old and 9 months, from the Directorate of Liberation in Beheira Badr Center, with bird flu, becoming the No. (62) in Egypt.
                        وذكر بيان لوزارة الصحة اليوم أن أعراض ظهور المرض على الطفل بدأت فى أول أبريل الحالي، وتم ادخاله مستشفى حميات مركز دمنهور، وعلاجه بعقار "التمافلو" فى نفس يوم دخوله المستشفى، حيث أن الطفل بصحة جيدة ومازال يتلقى العلاج.

                        A statement of the Ministry of Health said that the emergence of symptoms of the disease on the child started in the first of this month, has been admitted to hospital fevers Damanhour Center, and treated with "Altmavlo" in the same day he entered the hospital, where the child is still in good health and receiving treatment.







                        http://tinyurl.com/czjdf4
                        Last edited by sharon sanders; April 3, 2009, 05:03 PM. Reason: made tiny url for link

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                        • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                          2009 cases through last month

                          • Date of report: 26 March 2009
                          • Governorate: Qena
                          • District: Qena
                          • Event summary: Girl age 2?, began experiencing symptoms March 23. She was admitted to Qena Fever Hospital March 24 and received Tamiflu the same day. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed March 26, and the child was referred to Manshiyet el Bakry Hospital, Cairo. Her mother reported the child had close contact with a dead poultry. She was reported in a good general condition on March 18. The MOHP reported this was the 60th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt.
                          • Source of report: Amr Kandeel, Undersecretary for preventative affairs, MOHP
                            Samir Refaie, Head of Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, MOHP

                          • ---------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 18 March 2009
                          • Governorate: Assiut
                          • District: El Fath
                          • Event summary: Woman, age 38, began experiencing fever and headache March 14. She was admitted to Assiut Fever Hospital and given Tamiflu on March 14. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed March 18. The woman reported contact with dead and sick poultry. She was reported clinically free and in a good general condition on March 18. The MOHP reported this was the 59th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt.
                          • Source of report: Amr Kandeel, Undersecretary for preventative affairs, MOHP
                            Samir Refaie, Head of Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, MOHP

                          • ---------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 10 March 2009
                          • Governorate: Menoufiya
                          • District: Menouf
                          • Event summary: Girl, age 1?, began experiencing symptoms March 6. She was admitted to Menouf Fever Hospital upon showing symptoms of high fever and cough, and was given Tamiflu. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed March 10. The girl reportedly had a history of close contact with dead and sick poultry. The child was reported in a good general condition on March 10. The MOHP reported this was the 58th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt.

                          • ---------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 4 March 2009
                            Governorate: Alexandria
                          • District: Amira
                          • Event summary: Boy, age 2?, began experiencing symptoms March 3. The same day, he was admitted to Alexandria Fever Hospital and received Tamiflu. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed March 4. His family reported a history of close contact with dead and sick poultry. The child was in a good general condition March 4. The MOHP reported this was the 57th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt.
                          • Source of report: Amr Kandeel, Undersecretary for preventative affairs, MOHP
                            Samir Refaie, Head of Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, MOHP
                          • ---------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 1 March 2009
                          • Governorate: Fayoum
                          • District: Youssef el Seddik
                          • Event summary: Boy, age 2, began experiencing symptoms Feb. 25. He was admitted to Manshiet el Bakry General Hospital on Feb. 28. The child received Tamiflu the same day. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed March 1. His mother reported a history of close contact with dead and sick poultry. The child was in a critical condition under artificial ventilation March 1. The MOHP reported this was the 56th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt.
                          • Source of report: Amr Kandeel, Undersecretary for preventative affairs, MOHP
                            Samir Refaie, Head of Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, MOHP---------------------------------------
                            9 February 2009: 1?-year-old boy in Minya (Maghagha) stable with AI
                          • ---------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 3 February 2009
                          • Governorate: Suez
                          • District: Ganain
                          • Event summary: Boy, age 2, began experiencing symptoms Feb. 2.He was admitted to Suez Fever Hospital on Feb. 3; throat swab and blood samples were taken, and the child received Tamiflu the same day. Infection with avian influenza was confirmed Feb. 4. His mother reported a history of close contact with a dead poultry. The child was in a good general condition. The MOHP reported this was the 54rd case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt. 23 of the cases have been fatal.
                          • Source of report: Ministry of Health and Population ESU
                          • ---------------------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 26 January 2009
                          • Per the Ministry of Health and Population
                          • Governorate: Menoufiya
                          • District: Shebin Elkom
                          • Event summary: Girl, age 2, began experiencing symptoms Jan. 23: She was admitted to Sherbin Elkom Fever Hospital and administered Tamiflu the same day. Infection with the H5N1 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Egyptian Central Public Health Laboratory, according to the World Health organization. The MOHP said the girl was in good and stable condition Jan. 26. Her mother reported a history of close contact with sick poultry. The WHO reported this was the 53rd case of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Egypt; 23 of the cases have been fatal.
                            See related report.
                          • ---------------------------------------------------
                          • Date of report: 12 January 2009
                          • Per the Ministry of Health and Population/Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance (ESU)
                          • Governorate: Sixth of October
                          • District: Kerdasa (urban area located in western Giza; population 460,000)
                          • Village: Kafr Abu Hegazi (Saad Zaghloul Street near Abu Hegazi mosque)
                          • Event summary: Female infant, 21 months old, began experiencing symptoms January 9 evening. The family kept unvaccinated poultry that had become sick and died in the previous week. Infant was taken to hospital January 10. AI was suspected on Jan. 11; patient isolated; tests taken. Results on January 12 showed AI; patient was given Tamiflu and transferred. Specimens from mother and other contacts tested negative. The child was reported in good, stable condition Jan. 14.
                            • This was Egypt's 52st human infection.
                            • For Sixth of October Governorate, it was the fourth suspected human infection but the first to be confirmed positive. For Kerdasa district, it was the first suspected human case.

                          • Medical response: The infant around 8 p.m. January 9 began experiencing symptoms of fever, high temperature (41 C), cough, nasal discharge, vomiting, rapid breathing. Family sought medical care at Imbaba Fever Hospital on January 10.
                            • On January 11, case suspected as AI; patient isolated; specimen taken; Tamiflu administered at 1 p.m. Lab test of specimen returned positive for H5N1 virus on January 12; results by Central Public Health Laboratory (CPHL) and NAMRU-III. Case was referred to Manshiet el Bakry Hospital, Cairo.
                            • Specimens (blood samples and throat swabs) were taken at Imbaba Fever Hospital from mother and others who had contact with poultry; contacts were kept under supervision at home by Kerdasa Hospital health team. Negative results were found from specimen tests by CPHL.

                          • Condition of the home: The family had raised poultry at home that were unvaccinated. Last quantity was 150 chickens, 22 ducks, and 8 geese.
                            • The mother said some poultry began dying about a week before the child became sick. During the week, the mother and her family slaughtered the remaining poultry that were sick: 70 chicken and 6 geese. ESU reported they kept some live ducks and sold some ducks in the local market; and discarded many of the dead poultry in the garbage and around an irrigation canal.
                            • ESU said samples from poultry and from slaughtered birds stored in the house refrigerators were tested by MALR's National Laboratory for Veterinary Quality Control on Poultry Production (NLQP); all were found positive for H5N1 virus. MALR/GOVS said NLQP found only live ducks, only frozen. MALR/GOVS said samples were also taken from a neighbor's house located across a narrow street and were found positive. See related report.

                          • Findings of the Ministry of Health and Population's Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance (ESU): Mother's awareness and notification of dead poultry helped in early diagnosis and administering of Tamiflu (around 36 hours after the onset of the disease).

                          Comment


                          • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                            The case listing data in post #177 is derived from: http://www.saidr.org/en/humans.php#260309

                            This web site also has a map of animal and human H5N1 infections in Egypt. Care should be taken for any geo-analyses based on the maps because at least one of the human cases is misplotted. The 49th human cases in Egypt (April 2008), Walaa Ahmed Abdel Geleel, was reported as being from Al-Matariyah in the Cairo Governorate (approx. 30.116700, 31.316700). The SAIDR map identifies the 49th confirmed case from Matariya in the northern governorate of Ad Daqahliyah.
                            http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

                            Comment


                            • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                              Commentary

                              http://www.recombinomics.com/News/04...pt_Silent.html

                              Comment


                              • Re: Egypt - Human Confirmed/Suspected Bird Flu Cases, Feb 8, 2009+

                                New Bird Flu Case In Egypt Worries Europeans

                                Written by Stuart Stevens | Saturday, 04 April 2009 | There are 0 comments

                                Children often contract the bird flu virus in poorer areas
                                Confirmation from the Health Ministry in Egypt has come through regarding the death of an Egyptian boy from the bird flu virus. A Health Ministry spokesman explained that the two year old boy lived in the northern Egyptian province of Beheira about 80 miles north of Cairo.

                                Egypt has been hit by the bird flu virus many times and this case brings the number of human infections in the country to 61 and the number of deaths up to 23. Despite being admitted to hospital two days before dying and being given the best possible treatments the boy succumbed to the deadly high fever and respiratory problems that the virus brings on.
                                Most of the cases of the bird flu virus in humans have occurred inside Asia and therefore for European people the problem seems far away and distant however when cases are reported in Egypt health authorities in Europe start to take notice. There have been no human cases of the bird flu inside Europe yet.
                                Children often contract the bird flu virus in poor areas because they play with animals on farms. Because they have close respiratory contact with the animals due to their small size they contract the disease more easily than adults. In remote countryside areas in poor countries it is often too late by the time the virus is diagnosed for the children to be treated with bird flu medications such as Tamiflu.
                                The World Health Organisation which monitors all outbreaks of the bird flu virus report that over 400 individuals in fifteen different countries have been infected by the bird flu virus and that over 250 of them have died from it. The World Health Organisation has issued guidelines to all countries that they should have enough of the Tamiflu drug for 25 percent of their population to be treated just in case a bird flu pandemic breaks out which is easily transmittable between humans.


                                http://www.ukmedix.com/tamiflu/new_b...opeans4576.cfm
                                Last edited by AlaskaDenise; April 18, 2009, 02:13 AM. Reason: remove photo

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