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NOAA - Hurricane Season - Are You Prepared?

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  • NOAA - Hurricane Season - Are You Prepared?


    "Preventing the loss of life and minimizing the damage to property from hurricanes are responsibilities that are shared by all."

    Throughout this Web site, information has been provided regarding actions that you can take based on specific hurricane hazards. The most important thing that you can do is to be informed and prepared. Disaster prevention includes both being prepared as well as reducing damages (mitigation).


    Disaster Prevention should include:One of the most important decisions you will have to make is "Should I Evacuate?"
    If you are asked to evacuate, you should do so without delay. But unless you live in a coastal or low-lying area, an area that floods frequently, or in manufactured housing, it is unlikely that emergency managers will ask you to evacuate. That means that it is important for you and your family to HAVE A PLAN that makes you as safe as possible in your home.

    Disaster prevention includes modifying your home to strengthen it against storms so that you can be as safe as possible. It also includes having the supplies on hand to weather the storm. The suggestions provided here are only guides. You should use common sense in your disaster prevention.
    • DEVELOP A FAMILY PLAN - Your family's plan should be based on your vulnerability to the Hurricane Hazards. You should keep a written plan and share your plan with other friends or family.
    • CREATE A DISASTER SUPPLY KIT - There are certain items you need to have regardless of where you ride out a hurricane. The disaster supply kit is a useful tool when you evacuate as well as making you as safe as possible in your home.
    • SECURE YOUR HOME - There are things that you can do to make your home more secure and able to withstand stronger storms.
    • ONLINE VULNERABILITY INFO - There are web sites that can give you information about your communities vulnerability to specific hazards. These include hurricanes as well as other weather related hazards.
    <HR SIZE=1 width="90%" noShade>RELATED INFORMATION
    ONLINE VULNERABILITY INFO
    PDF RESOURCES

    RELATED MULTIMEDIA
    AGAINST THE WIND (0.2mb)
    MAX MAYFIELD DISCUSSES - BEING PREPARED (0.1mb MP3)
    MAX MAYFIELD DISCUSSES - HAVING A PLAN (0.1mb MP3)

    RELATED WEBSITES
    FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
    AMERICAN RED CROSS



    <HR SIZE=1 width="90%" noShade>
    ADDITIONAL SAFETY INFORMATION

    FAMILY DISASTER PLAN
    • Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind.
    • Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community.
    • Determine escape routes from your home and places to meet.
    • Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your family members have a single point of contact.
    • Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate.
    • Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make sure your children know how and when to call 911.
    • Check your insurance coverage - flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance. National Flood Insurance Program
    • Stock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster Supply Kit.
    • Use a NOAA weather radio. Remember to replace its battery every 6 months, as you do with your smoke detectors.
    • Take First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.
    http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english...evention.shtml
    <!-- #EndEditable -->
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Re: NOAA - Hurricane Season - Are You Prepared?

    Hurricane Preparedness for PETS

    US Gov:
    http://www.ready.gov/america/_downloads/pets.pdf

    American Veterinary Medicine Association
    http://www.avma.org/disaster/
    FEMA
    http://www.fema.gov/individual/animals.shtm

    Humane Society
    http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/...etBrochure.pdf

    Pet Friendly Accomodations
    http://www.humanela.org/hurricanepreparedness.htm
    HSL HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS GUIDELINES

    Pet Evacuation Kit Provisions
    Pet First Aid Kit Provisions
    Mayor Nagin's Evacuation Plan
    Pet Friendly Lodging
    More Evacuation Guidelines
    Want to Help Evacuate Animals?




    NHC - NOAA

    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td bgcolor="6382ad" valign="top" width="101"> </td> <td valign="top"></td> <td valign="top" width="100%">
    BEFORE THE DISASTER
    DURING THE DISASTER
    AFTER THE DISASTER


    Contact your veterinarian or local humane society for information on preparing your pets for an emergency.
    BEFORE THE DISASTER
    • Make sure that your pets are current on their vaccinations. Pet shelters may require proof of vaccines.
    • Have a current photograph
    • Keep a collar with identification on your pet and have a leash on hand to control your pet.
    • Have a properly-sized pet carrier for each animal - carriers should be large enough for the animal to stand and turn around.
    • Plan your evacuation strategy and don't forget your pet! Specialized pet shelters, animal control shelters, veterinary clinics and friends and relatives out of harm's way are ALL potential refuges for your pet during a disaster.

    If you plan to shelter your pet - work it into your evacuation route planning.
    DURING THE DISASTER
    • Animals brought to a pet shelter are required to have: Proper identification collar and rabies tag, proper identification on all belongings, a carrier or cage, a leash, an ample supply of food, water and food bowls, any necessary medications, specific care instructions and news papers or trash bags for clean-up.
    • Bring pets indoor well in advance of a storm - reassure them and remain calm.
    • Pet shelters will be filled on first come, first served basis. Call ahead and determine availability.

    AFTER THE DISASTER
    • Walk pets on a leash until they become re-oriented to their home - often familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and pets could easily be confused and become lost. Also, downed power lines, reptiles brought in with high water and debris can all pose a threat for animals after a disaster.
    • If pets cannot be found after a disaster, contact the local animal control office to find out where lost animals can be recovered. Bring along a picture of your pet if possible.
    • After a disaster animals can become aggressive or defensive - monitor their behavior.

    Don't forget your pet when preparing a family disaster plan.
    PET DISASTER SUPPLY KIT
    •Proper identification including immunization records
    •Ample supply of food and water
    •A carrier or cage
    •Medications
    •Muzzle, collar and leash

    ADDITIONAL LINKS
    The HUMANE SOCIETY Disaster Center
    FEMA - Animals and
    </td></tr></tbody></table>http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english...pet_plan.shtml

    For locations where pets may be welcome - Search internet for "pets welcome"

    Pet Friendly Shelters - Florida
    http://www.floridapets.net/petfriendlyshelters.html

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