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American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

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  • American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

    <TABLE class=c_space cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=center align=left width="100%" background=/dnn/Portals/_default/Containers/S-S_Medical3/images/c3_tm.gif><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center noWrap align=left width="10%">Poison Centers' Response to the Oil Spill </TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=middle width="10%"></TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=middle width="5%"></TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=right width="75%"></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD><TD align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class="Normal c_contentpane c3_bd DNNAlignright" id=dnn_ctr1206_ContentPane vAlign=top align=middle><!-- Start_Module_1206 -->
    • During the initial reaction to the spill, the U.S. Coast Guard tweeted a message urging those with health-care concerns about the Gulf Oil Spill to call their local poison center at 1 (800) 222-1222 . Since then, both state and agencies have similarly prodded the public to call their poison center with health questions about the spill.
    • Poison centers offer free, confidential services 24 hours a day, seven days a week and are staffed by medically trained professionals.
    • Poison centers are sharing oil spill-related data with federal agencies including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Institutes of Health.
    • The Louisiana Poison Center has worked with tribes in the state of Louisiana to publicize the availability of their services and to offer outreach to tribal members who are affected by or responding to the spill.
    • Poison center professionals are receiving frequent updates tracking the spill as it moves through the Gulf.
    • The Louisiana Poison Center is working with the state's Center for Epidemiology and Environmental Toxicology to track the number of poison exposures related to the spill.
    • So far, inhalation appears to be the most common means of exposure to oil spill-related toxins.
    • Poison centers are preparing for a variety of exposures - the Louisiana Poison Center, for example, surveyed hospitals in Louisiana to ensure adequate antivenin supplies in case of increased snakebites to relief workers in the marsh areas of the state.
















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    <TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center noWrap align=left width="10%">The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers </TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=middle width="10%"></TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=middle width="5%"></TD><TD vAlign=center noWrap align=right width="75%"></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter" id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->



    As of 3:59 a.m. Thursday, June 24, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
    • 425 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
    • 318 information calls (calls seeking information about the health-related effects of the oil spill)
    Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas and Virginia.




    Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 164, followed by Florida (98) Alabama (92), and Mississippi (36).




    Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.





    This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.



    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

    As of 8:31 a.m. Friday, July 2, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
    • 588 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
    • 441 information calls (calls seeking information about the health-related effects of the oil spill)
    Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

    Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 195, followed by Florida (157) Alabama (133), and Mississippi (54).

    Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.

    This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.

    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

      <TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=left>The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers </TD><TD vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="5%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="75%" noWrap align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter"><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->
      As of 4:00 a.m. Tuesday, July 13, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
      • 740 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
      • 505 information calls (calls seeking information about the health-related effects of the oil spill)
      Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.


      Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 220, followed by Florida (193) Alabama (169), and Mississippi (89).

      Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.

      This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.




      </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

        <TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=left>The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers </TD><TD vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="5%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="75%" noWrap align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter"><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->
        As of 9:53 a.m. Friday, July 16, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
        • 808 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
        • 528 information calls (calls that involve people who have questions about the medical impact of the oil spill.)
        Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.


        Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 230, followed by Florida (203) Alabama (199), and Mississippi (99).

        Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.

        This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.

        </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

        http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/NewsandEven...2/Default.aspx
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

          As of 4 a.m. Friday, July 23, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
          • 920 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
          • 544 information calls (calls that involve people who have questions about the medical impact of the oil spill.)

          Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
          Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 243, followed by Florida (208) Alabama (222), and Mississippi (167).
          Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.
          This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.


          http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/NewsandEven...2/Default.aspx

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

            <HR style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #cccccc; COLOR: #cccccc" SIZE=1><!-- / icon and title --><TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=left>The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers </TD><TD vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="5%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="75%" noWrap align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter"><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->
            As of 3:59 a.m. Tuesday, July 27, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
            • 957 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
            • 549 information calls (calls that involve people who have questions about the medical impact of the oil spill.)
            Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.


            Of those, Louisiana has received the most calls: 249, followed by Florida (211) Alabama (233), and Mississippi (183).
            Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.

            This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.

            </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


            http://www.aapcc.org/dnn/NewsandEven...2/Default.aspx
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

              <TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=left>The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers </TD><TD vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="5%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="75%" noWrap align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter"><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->
              As of 3:59 a.m. Tuesday, August 3, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
              • 1042 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
              • 651 information calls (calls that involve people who have questions about the medical impact of the oil spill.)
              Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.


              Of those, Louisiana and Alabama have received the most calls: 255, followed by Mississippi (230) and Florida (220).

              Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.

              This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.





              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: American Association of Poison Control Centers - Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Disaster Response and Calls

                <TABLE class="c_space c5_bg" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=left><TABLE class=c5_top border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=Head vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=left>The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) nationwide number for access to the 60 US poison control centers: 1-800-222-1222


                The Oil Spill and Calls to Poison Centers



                </TD><TD vAlign=center width="10%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="5%" noWrap align=middle></TD><TD vAlign=center width="75%" noWrap align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD id=dnn_ctr1205_ContentPane class="Normal c5_contentpane DNNAligncenter"><!-- Start_Module_1205 -->As of 4 a.m. Friday, August 13, 2010, U.S. poison centers have taken the following number of calls regarding the Gulf Oil spill:
                • 1102 exposure calls (calls that involve someone being exposed to an oil-spill related toxin, be it oil, dispersant, food contamination or other associated toxin.)
                • 660 information calls (calls that involve people who have questions about the medical impact of the oil spill.)
                Poison centers have taken exposure calls from the following states or countries: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.



                Of those, Alabama has received the most calls: 269, followed by Louisiana (262) Mississippi (246) and Florida (237).



                Most exposures so far have been via inhalation, though dermal exposure is also commonly reported. Most common symptoms reported have included: headaches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, throat irritation, eye pain, coughing/choking and dizziness.



                This site will be frequently updated in the weeks to come.


                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment

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