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New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Official alarmed by vessels coming dangerously close to levee in river

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  • New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Official alarmed by vessels coming dangerously close to levee in river

    Epic flooding will test levee system as never before, experts say

    <!--endclickprintinclude--><!--startclickprintexclude-->By Tom Watkins, CNN<SCRIPT type=text/javascript>cnnAuthor = "By Tom Watkins, CNN";</SCRIPT>
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript>if(location.hostname.indexOf( 'edition.' ) > -1) {document.write('May 10, 2011 -- Updated 0933 GMT (1733 HKT)');} else {document.write('May 10, 2011 5:33 a.m. EDT');}</SCRIPT>May 10, 2011 5:33 a.m. EDTMay 10, 2011 5:33 a.m. EDT


    Excerpt:

    Under the best-case scenario, the Army Corps of Engineers will prove able to manage the water flow and flooding will be minor. But there is little doubt that property will be lost and the economy will take a hit, Dakka said.

    "On the other hand, the worst-case scenario is that the water rises, we're not able to manage it, it finds the weak areas, exploits those vulnerabilities, perhaps even segments of the river levee get taken out by erosion or collapse due to failure of saturated levees or other things could happen -- ships get loose in the river; barges of chemicals run into the side of the levee."

    If levees break, weeks could pass before engineers could reseal them, he said.

    But Dakka said his worst-case scenario might not tell the whole story.

    "There are unintended consequences that are going to happen that we can't possibly even fathom right now," he said. "We just have to be ready for it and get people out of the way."

    Full text:
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/05/09/mis...ooding.impact/

    -----------------------------------------------

    How the Mississippi River levees could fail

    May 9th, 2011
    09:14 PMET

    Excerpt:

    Earthen levees should keep most of the larger towns and cities safe as an extraordinarily high volume of water runs down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico. But levees can fail, in part because moving water has tremendous force. This force will try to erode, saturate, undermine and destroy everything in the way.

    Most levees are piles of dirt lined along edges of a river. In theory, vegetation and its roots will keep the dirt stable as water flows by.

    Levees can fail if water runs over the top ? this is called overtopping. The force of the moving water erodes the soil below, and this can cause a catastrophic breach. The erosion continues until the hole is so large that floodwaters surge into the now unprotected land.

    Levees also can fail from below as the water pressure undermines the piled dirt. The water forces itself below the levee and eventually out from the bottom on the dry side of the pile. This is called a sand boil or a mud boil, because of its bubbling appearance.

    Also, too many days with floodwater near the top of a levee can saturate the levee?s soil, causing a washout and breach.

    Full text:
    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/05/09...es-could-fail/
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Re: Epic flooding will test levee system as never before, experts say

    N.O. officials worried about what will happen when river levels recede

    wwltv.com
    Posted on May 14, 2011 at 10:09 PM
    Updated yesterday at 10:15 PM
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    Monica Hernandez / Eyewitness News

    The opening of the Morganza Spillway will help relieve pressure on levees and ease the threat of flooding for New Orleans and Baton Rouge. But local officials say that doesn't necessarily mean the Crescent City is out of the woods just yet. They're still closely monitoring river levels.

    "It fundamentally hasn't changed, we're still monitoring the levees, 24/7," said Susan Maclay, president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority- West.

    Officials biggest concern now for New Orleans is what will happen when the water goes down.

    "There has been an enormous amount of pressure on these levees. And when the water starts to go down, there's the potential for bank cave-ins," said Maclay.

    The river is expected to remain high for weeks, and if it recedes too quickly portions of the levees could be pulled into the river. It's a big concern as hurricane season approaches.

    More...
    http://www.wwltv.com/news/river-watc...121844284.html
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Epic flooding will test levee system as never before, experts say

      New Orleans -

      East bank levees being monitored as river remains high
      http://<EMBED height=288 type=application/x-shockwave-flash width=470 src=http://www.wwltv.com/v/?i=121840034 AllowFullScreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" wmode="transparent"></EMBED>

      by WWLTV.com
      wwltv.com
      Posted on May 14, 2011 at 6:42 PM
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      Tim Doody, president of SELA Authority East, discusses the conditions of levees on east bank in the New Orleans area.

      http://www.wwltv.com/news/river-watc...121840034.html
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Epic flooding will test levee system as never before, experts say

        New Orleans

        Mississippi River water seeps through Metro area levees

        Reported by: Bigad Shaban, Reporter
        Email: bshaban@fox8tv.net
        Last Update: 5/17 11:58 pm

        At the corner of River and Marrero Roads in Marrero, you?ll find tiny pools of water along the grass, on the road, and in the mud. But puddles aren't just puddles when the water is from the Mississippi River and its seeping through a flood protection levee.
        ...
        It's one of 27 seepage spots now monitored routinely by the South East Flood Protection Authority-West, which patrols both Orleans and Jefferson parishes.
        ...
        The clarity of the water is the biggest indicator on just how safe the seepage spot may be. Clear is okay, say officials, where as a more muddy mixture means that water from the Mississippi River is actually taking part of the levee with it as it seeps through?ruining the flood protection.

        Levee district officials on the West Bank say all the seepage spots they've seen are emitting relatively clear water, that is except two somewhat murky spots the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently investigated and found not to be a threat. On the East Bank, inspectors haven't found any signs of seepage in Jefferson Parish, but are watching 3 in Orleans and 8 in St. Bernard. All so far, they say, show clear water.

        Full text:

        http://www.fox8live.com/content/news...Ig40-VT7A.cspx
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Mississippi River water seeps through Metro area levees

          Inspections of levees continue as river remains high

          wwltv.com
          Posted on May 17, 2011 at 10:42 PM
          <?xml:namespace prefix = fb /><fb:like class=" fb_edge_widget_with_comment fb_iframe_widget" show_faces="false" layout="button_count" action="recommend" width="130"></fb:like>
          Scott Satchfield / Eyewitness News

          On both banks of the river, it's a non-stop effort, as inspectors ride along the levees, looking for seepage, like this spot in Marrero, or this one in the French Quarter.

          With river levels continuing to hover around 17 feet, the levees are enduring heavy, constant pressure.

          "There is the potential for erosion," said Robert Turner, of SELA Flood Protection Authority - East

          Turner with the East Bank's flood protection authority says there 21 known seepage areas on his side of the river.
          ...
          "There is the potential for some of these levees to get saturated and for some of these seepage areas to get worse and possibly even develop into sand boils," said Turner.

          Full text:

          http://www.wwltv.com/news/Inspection...122119729.html
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Mississippi River water seeps through Metro area levees

            PRESS RELEASE
            <!-- Title of the Press Release -->Louisiana CPRA issues Emergency Order on Flood Protection
            <!-- START of Press Release text --><!-- City and Date of the Press Release -->
            BATON ROUGE (May 18, 2011) - In coordination with parishes, levee districts and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority issued an emergency order restricting activities on or adjacent to flood control and flood-fighting measures.

            The emergency rule signed last night allows levee districts to establish pedestrian viewing areas on levee structures controlled by law enforcement officials, but restricts pedestrian and vehicular (including all-terrain, recreational and farm equipment) traffic within 300 feet of the centerline of a levee or other flood control structure.

            This does not stop access for fishermen or others. The order allows for commercial permitted activities (such as boat launches) to continue for 72 hours then respective levee districts will grant waivers on a case by case basis.

            CPRA Chair Garret Graves, who issued the order, said, "We want to ensure that people have an opportunity to safely view this historic event, but the maximum design capacity of these levees and structures is being tested during these high water conditions. One mistake could have drastic consequences."

            The order also restricts disturbing seepage areas, prohibits unpermitted subsurface work within 1500 feet of flood control structures and bans the use of explosives or demolition within 5000 feet of levees and other flood measures.

            The emergency rule issued today also establishes more stringent conditions under which vessels, barges or other water craft must be moored adjacent to levee structures.

            "The Mississippi River system drains about 41 percent of the continental United States or 15 percent of the North American continent. This includes 31 states and two Canadian Provinces or more than 1.2 million square miles." Graves said. "With a million cubic feet of water or more passing any point on the Mississippi River in our state and extraordinary flows in the Atchafalaya, this emergency order is designed to keep the water between the levees."

            Waivers to the restrictions may be granted by respective levee districts or the Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration.

            The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, levee districts and other state and local law enforcement officials are authorized to enforce the order. Violators are subject to fines of up to $10,000 and six months in jail per incident.

            http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Relea...loodProtection
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Mississippi River water seeps through Metro area levees

              Authorities keeping close eye on river barges too close to levees

              wwltv.com
              Posted on May 21, 2011 at 5:14 PM
              Updated yesterday at 6:22 PM
              <?xml:namespace prefix = fb /><fb:like class=" fb_edge_widget_with_comment fb_iframe_widget" layout="button_count" width="130" action="recommend" show_faces="false"></fb:like>

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              Maya Rodriguez / Eyewitness News

              ALGIERS, La.-- Barges are a common sight on the Mississippi River, hauling everything from grain to chemicals up and down the waterway. In some cases, though, some barges may be mooring a little too close for comfort.

              "On the other side of these levees, it's all residential. So, if we have an accident here, we're talking people's lives and property," said Susan Maclay, president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-- West.

              Maclay said in the past two weeks alone they have had 28 cases, where barges were fined because they were too close to the levee. By law, barges must stay at least 180 feet from levees. All but two of the 28 incidents happened within a four-mile stretch of the levees in Algiers.

              More...
              http://www.wwltv.com/news/Authoritie...122392024.html
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Mississippi River water seeps through Metro area levees

                Flooding threat along Mississippi River is a test of man vs. nature


                By Joel Achenbach, Published: May 21

                The snakes are out. And the bears. The gators. The jumbo rodents known as nutria. The feral hogs. They seek higher ground as the floodwaters advance, and that can mean the top of a levee or in someone’s back yard. Herds of deer have clumped on tiny islands in an ancient swamp that is becoming a lake.

                The humans are scrambling, too. They’ve filled a million sandbags. The flood fighters deploy barriers known as tiger dams, HESCO baskets, aqua tubes and sheet pile. The hospitals have stockpiled antivenin in anticipation of a surge in snakebites. Officials the other day shot a 10-foot gator on a levee near New Orleans.

                Engineers on Saturday were tracking roughly 250 seepage points along the levees that line the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers. The levees sit on fine sand that lets the river water escape like a convict tunneling out of prison. The water can pop up a mile away. Left to its own devices, one of these sand boils (where water erupts as if from spring) can undermine a levee and lead to a crevasse, a full levee failure — and disaster.

                More...
                http://www.washingtonpost.com/nation...h8G_story.html
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Official alarmed by vessels coming dangerously close to levee in river

                  Official alarmed by vessels coming dangerously close to levee in river


                  http://<EMBED height=288 type=application/x-shockwave-flash width=470 src=http://www.wwltv.com/v/?i=122701284 AllowFullScreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" wmode="transparent"></EMBED>

                  wwltv.com
                  Posted on May 26, 2011 at 10:20 PM
                  <?xml:namespace prefix = fb /><fb:like class=" fb_edge_widget_with_comment fb_iframe_widget" show_faces="false" layout="button_count" action="recommend" width="130"></fb:like>

                  <DL></DL>
                  Dennis Woltering / Eyewitness news

                  NEW ORLEANS -- The president of the metro area's West Bank Flood Protection Authority is alarmed by the latest of four dangerous incidents in which a vessel came too close to a levee as the Mississippi River flows at record high levels.

                  ?In the worst-case scenario the levee itself or the wall could have been breached,? said Susan Maclay, president of the S.E. Flood Protection Authority ? West.

                  Maclay said this picture shows just how close a barge got to the levee yesterday, risking a breach and millions in property damage.

                  More...
                  http://www.wwltv.com/news/Official-a...122701284.html
                  "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                  -Nelson Mandela

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New Orleans - Epic flooding will test levee system as never before - Official alarmed by vessels coming dangerously close to levee in river

                    Engineers look for danger signs on levees

                    By Rick Jervis, USA TODAY

                    Updated<SCRIPT type=text/javascript>document.write(niceDate('6/1/2011 12:37 AM'));</SCRIPT> 1d 8h ago |
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                    NEW ORLEANS ? As the Mississippi River starts a slow retreat, dangers still lurk in the water and on riverbanks.
                    ...
                    Work crews have tracked 15 sand boils and 250 signs of seepage in the New Orleans district, which covers 324 miles of the river, Stack says. Another 246 were counted upriver in the Vicksburg, Miss., district.

                    One sand boil near Cairo, Ill., was 50 feet across and 10 feet high, one of the largest in recent years, says Steve Barry, an emergency manager for the Army Corps' Memphis district. Truckloads of crushed limestone were brought in to seal off the area and prevent a breach, he says.

                    "I've been with the corps for more than 20 years and it's the biggest one I've ever seen in my life," Barry says.

                    Full text:
                    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...s-levees_n.htm
                    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                    -Nelson Mandela

                    Comment

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