Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

China - Government statement: reports first human case of H3N8 bird flu, Henan province - April 26, 2022

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • China - Government statement: reports first human case of H3N8 bird flu, Henan province - April 26, 2022

    Source: https://wtvbam.com/2022/04/26/china-...h3n8-bird-flu/

    China reports first human case of H3N8 bird flu
    By Syndicated Content
    Apr 26, 2022 | 10:01 AM

    BEIJING (Reuters) – China has recorded the first human infection with the H3N8 strain of bird flu, the country’s health authority said on Tuesday, but said the risk of it spreading among people was low.

    A four-year-old boy from central Henan province was found to have been infected with the variant after developing a fever and other symptoms on April 5.

    No close contacts were infected with the virus, the National Health Commission said in a statement.

    The child had been in contact with chickens and crows raised at his home, it added.

    The H3N8 variant has previously been detected elsewhere in the world in horses, dogs, birds and seals but no human cases of H3N8 have been reported, said the NHC.

    The commission said an initial assessment determined the variant did not yet have the ability to effectively infect humans, and the risk of a large-scale epidemic was low...

  • #2

    Government statement -



    A case of human infection with H3N8 avian influenza found in Henan Province


    Release time: 2022-04-26 Source: Office of Health Emergencies


    The National Health Commission announced on April 26 that a case of human infection with H3N8 avian influenza was found in Henan Province .
    The patient , male, 4 years old, now lives in Zhumadian City, Henan Province. Before the onset of the disease, the patient had raised chickens and black-bone chickens at home, and there were wild ducks around the home . He developed fever and other symptoms on April 5 , and was admitted to a local medical institution for treatment on the 10th due to aggravation of his condition . On the 24th , the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a test on the patient specimen sent from Henan Province , and the result was positive for the H3N8 avian influenza virus. Henan Province carried out medical observation and sampling tests on the close contacts of the child, and no abnormality was found .
    The National Health Commission has instructed Henan Province to carry out prevention and control in accordance with relevant plans, and organized experts to carry out risk assessments. Experts' preliminary assessment believes that the H3N8 avian influenza virus is of avian origin and has not yethad the ability to effectively infect humans. H3N8 virus has been detected in horses, dogs, birds and seals worldwide , but no human cases of H3N8 have been reported . This outbreak is an occasional bird-to-human cross-species transmission, and the risk of a large-scale epidemic is low. Experts suggest that the public should avoid contact with sick and dead poultry in their daily lives, and try to avoid direct contact with live poultry; pay attention to dietary hygiene, and separate raw and cooked food during food processing; raise awareness of self-protection, and those with fever and respiratory symptoms should be Wear a mask and seek medical attention as soon as possible.



    http://www.nhc.gov.cn/yjb/s3578/2022...8523e289.shtml

    Comment


    • #3
      Blog analysis:

      China: NHC Confirms Human Avian H3N8 Infection In Henan Province & Brief History Of H3N8 Viruses

      Comment


      • #5
        bump this

        Comment


        • #6
          Source: https://www.who.int/emergencies/dise...(h3n8)---china


          Avian Influenza A(H3N8) - China

          9 May 2022








          Situation at a glance
          On 25 April 2022, the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China notified WHO of one confirmed case of human infection with an avian influenza A(H3N8) virus. This case appears to be the first reported case of human infection with an avian influenza A(H3N8) virus. No further cases have yet been detected among close contacts. Further epidemiological and virological investigation of this event is underway. Currently limited available epidemiologic and virologic information suggests that this avian influenza A(H3N8) virus has not acquired the ability of sustained transmission among humans, therefore, the risk at the national, regional and international level of disease spread among humans is assessed as low.
          Description of the case

          On 25 April 2022, the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China notified WHO of one confirmed case of human infection with an avian influenza A(H3N8) virus. The case is a 4-year-old boy from Henan Province. He developed fever, cough, shortness of breath on 5 April 2022, and was admitted to the hospital in critical condition on 10 April 2022 with severe pneumonia with respiratory failure. The case was then transferred to the ICU where antivirals were administered. Samples collected from the patient after hospitalization were tested for respiratory viruses (including influenza) and influenza A(H3N8) was detected in several samples. No other respiratory viruses were detected.
          On 24 April 2022, The National Influenza Center of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention tested the specimen sent from Henan Province. It confirmed that the influenza A virus in the sample was the A(H3N8) subtype and all genes were of avian origin.
          Before his onset of illness, the case had consumed chickens that were kept in the backyard but did not have direct exposure to them prior to illness onset. Clinical observation and sampling of the case’s close contacts, environment, local poultry market, and wild bird habitat were conducted, and no infection or any symptoms of illness were found. Further epidemiological and virological investigation (i.e., animals and environmental testing) of this event is underway.
          Epidemiology
          This case appears to be the first reported case of human infection with an avian influenza A(H3N8) virus. No further cases have yet been detected among close contacts. There is limited information on the relatedness of the virus infecting this case to other avian influenza A(H3) viruses circulating in animals.
          Influenza type A viruses are classified into subtypes according to different virus surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). So far, there are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes, with only a few of these subtypes circulating in humans (seasonal influenza). Depending on the origin host, influenza A viruses can also be classified as avian influenza, swine influenza, human influenza, etc., or other types of animal influenza viruses. When animal influenza viruses infect humans, these are called zoonotic infections.
          Zoonotic influenza type A infections may cause diseases ranging from mild upper respiratory infection (fever and cough) to rapid progression to severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock, and even death.
          In terms of transmission, human infections with avian and other zoonotic influenza viruses, though rare, have been reported. Human infections are primarily acquired through direct contact with infected animals or contaminated environments but do not result in the efficient transmission of these viruses between people. The primary risk factor for human infection appears to be direct or indirect exposure to infected animals or contaminated environments, such as live bird markets. Slaughtering, defeathering, handling carcasses of infected poultry, and preparing poultry for consumption are also likely to be risk factors.
          Avian A(H3N8) influenza viruses are commonly detected globally in animals and represent one of the most frequently found subtypes in wild birds, causing minimal to no sign of disease in domestic poultry or wild birds. Cross-species transmission events of avian A(H3N8) influenza viruses have been reported for various mammal species, for example, equine and canine lineage of A(H3N8) viruses cause outbreaks in horses and dogs respectively.

          Public health response

          The Chinese government has taken the following monitoring, prevention, and control measures:
          • Testing of close contacts, animals, and environment around the case;
          • Conducting a risk assessment;
          • Strengthening joint prevention and control;
          • Strengthening surveillance and epidemiological investigation;
          • Treatment of the patient;
          • Carrying out a study on the origin of disease;
          • Public risk communication activities to improve public awareness and adoption of self-protection measures.

          WHO risk assessment

          Currently, limited available epidemiologic and virologic information suggests that this avian influenza A(H3N8) virus has not acquired the ability of sustained transmission among humans. Therefore, the risk at the national, regional and international level of disease spread is assessed as low. However, further sporadic human cases can be expected as long as the virus continues to be detected in poultry populations. Additional information from human and animal investigations and studies is needed to better assess the current risk posed to public health.
          The risk assessment will be reviewed in case further epidemiological or virological information indicates possible human-to-human transmission.

          WHO advice

          Prevention: Countries should raise public awareness to avoid contact with high-risk environments such as live animal markets/farms and live poultry or surfaces that might be contaminated by poultry or bird feces.
          Personal protective measures include:
          • Regular handwashing with proper drying of the hands
          • Good respiratory hygiene – covering mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, using tissues and disposing of them correctly
          • Early self-isolation of those feeling unwell, feverish, and having other symptoms of influenza
          • Avoiding close contact with sick people
          • Avoiding touching one’s eyes, nose, or mouth
          • Respiratory protection when at-risk environment
          Appropriate infection prevention and control measures in health care settings should always be applied. Health care workers performing aerosol-generating procedures should use airborne precautions. Standard contact and droplet precautions and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) should be available during epidemics.
          Travelers to countries and people living in countries with known outbreaks of avian influenza should, if possible, avoid poultry farms, contact with animals in live poultry markets, entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered, and contact with any surfaces that appear to be contaminated with faeces from poultry or other animals. Good food safety and hygiene practices should be followed. Travelers returning from affected regions should report to local health services if respiratory symptoms zoonotic influenza virus infection.
          Surveillance: Due to the constantly evolving nature of influenza viruses, WHO continues to stress the importance of global surveillance to detect virological, epidemiological, and clinical changes associated with circulating influenza viruses that may affect human (or animal) health and timely virus and information sharing for risk assessment. A thorough investigation of every human infection and timely virus sharing with a WHO Collaborating Centre for reference and research on influenza and genetic and antigenic characterization is essential.
          International Health Regulations: All human infections caused by a new subtype of influenza virus are notifiable under the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005). A novel influenza A virus is considered to have the potential to cause a pandemic, and Member State Parties are required to immediately notify WHO of any laboratory-confirmed case of a human infection caused by such an influenza A virus. This event does not change the current WHO recommendations on public health measures and influenza surveillance.
          International travel or trade: WHO does not recommend any travel and/or trade restrictions based on the currently available information...



          Comment


          • #7
            bump this

            Comment

            Working...
            X