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  • Man dies of suspected bird flu in Guangzhou

    China reports new human case of bird flu
    Woman testing positive for H5N1 is country's 11th case
    Feb. 8, 2006. 11:02 AM
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    BEIJING ó A 26-year-old Chinese woman has contracted bird flu, the government said today, becoming at least the 11th person to be infected with the disease in China.
    Until the latest case was reported in coastal Fujian province, there had been 10 reported human cases of bird flu on the mainland. Only three survived.
    The official Xinhua News Agency said the Chinese Health Ministry confirmed that the woman, surnamed Liu from the Fujian's Zhangpu county, tested positive for the H5N1 strain of the virus. The report did not give her full name.
    It said there has been no outbreak so far of avian flu among birds detected in the area where Liu lives. People with close contact to her before she fell ill have been put under medical observation, Xinhua said.
    Earlier Wednesday, China reported its 29th outbreak of the disease in birds since Oct. 19.
    Up to 15,000 fowl in Yijing, a town in China's northern Shanxi province, were found dead Feb. 2 -3, Xinhua said. It did not specify the type of birds.
    They tested positive for the virulent H5N1 strain of the disease, Xinhua said.
    So far, more than 187,000 birds have been culled in the area, it said.
    Meanwhile, in Hong Kong on Wednesday, government health officials said a dead egret found in a suburb of Hong Kong has tested positive for H5N1.
    Officials have been trying to prevent epidemics in birds because it increases the chances of the disease being passed to humans.
    The Chinese government says it has destroyed 22.5 million birds over the past year in order to contain repeated bird flu outbreaks in poultry in areas throughout the country.
    China's human deaths were reported in Sichuan province and the Guangxi region in the south and in the provinces of Jiangxi and Anhui in the east and Fujian.
    While most of the human infections have been linked to direct contact with sick poultry, experts have warned that the virus could mutate into a form that could be easily transmitted between people, possibly sparking a global flu pandemic that could kill millions.

    http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...d=968332188492
    Last edited by Clytie; February 12, 2006, 03:06 PM.

  • #2
    Yi Guan: H5N1 circulating in Chinese poultry for a decade

    China is the home of bird fluA MASSIVE analysis of flu viruses has finally confirmed what everyone suspected: the H5N1 virus has been circulating in Chinese poultry for over a decade.

    Yi Guan at Shantou University, China, and his colleagues studied samples from 13,000 migratory birds and 50,000 market poultry in south-east China between January 2004 and June 2005. They found H5N1 in around 2 per cent of apparently healthy ducks and geese, and also in some chickens.

    Most importantly, the virus's genes formed geographic clusters that differed slightly between the Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Hunan and Yunnan, suggesting that it must have been circulating long enough to have evolved into different strains.

    The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0511120103), pinpoints Guangdong and neighbouring Guangxi and Hunan provinces in south-eastern China as the probable source of the virus, as H5N1 there shows the most genetic variation. The virus then "colonised" other areas: viruses from Thailand and Vietnam are most similar to viruses from Guangdong, while Vietnam appears to have been repeatedly invaded by H5N1 from Guangxi province, most recently in 2005.

    In the past Chinese officials have insisted that H5N1 exists only in isolated cases in China, and did not necessarily originate there.

    Comment


    • #3
      New human infection found in Fujian

      New human infection found in Fujian
      By Zhao Huanxin and Cecilia Lo (China Daily)
      Updated: 2006-02-09 05:30


      The Ministry of Health last night announced another human infection of the bird flu, bringing the total number of reported cases to 11.

      The latest case was a 26-year-old female farmer in Zhangpu County, East China's Fujian Province. She fell ill on January 10, showing symptoms of fever and pneumonia. Her samples later tested positive for H5N1 virus at China Disease Prevention and Control Centre.

      The woman is now in stable condition after treatment, according to a notice on the ministry's website.

      The ministry has already reported the case to the World Health Organization, Hong Kong and Macao health authorities and some neighbouring countries.

      The most recent case before this one was reported on January 23. Six of the 11 human cases have died.

      Health workers did not find any evidence of the bird flu epidemic in the area where the Fujian woman lived, the ministry said.
      Earlier, China confirmed the first outbreak of bird flu in nearly a month, which killed about 15,000 poultry in North China's Shanxi Province.

      The Ministry of Agriculture said late on Tuesday night that the virulent H5N1 strain was discovered at a farm in Yijing Town of Yangquan city on February 2 and 3.

      The outbreak has been brought under control after local authorities implemented contingency plans, the ministry said.

      Veterinary workers would have vaccinated all poultry near the site of the outbreak by today, local officials said yesterday.

      "In addition to culling 187,745 poultry within 3 kilometres from the affected areas, we are giving shots to 230,000 head of poultry mainly chickens within a 5-kilometre radius," Jin Aiyin, an official with the Yangquan Agricultural Bureau, said.

      Since May 2005, the Chinese mainland has reported more than 30 outbreaks of fatal bird flu among poultry. All but one have been lifted from quarantine isolation, according to the Ministry of Agriculture.

      In Hong Kong, a 20-month-old boy who visited Sichuan Province during Lunar New Year and showed symptoms of respiratory infection on February 4 has tested negative for H5N1.

      The Hospital Authority said in a statement yesterday that the boy was still in isolation at Queen Elizabeth Hospital and was in stable condition.
      Hong Kong's Acting Deputy Secretary for Health, Welfare and Food Vincent Liu told a radio programme yesterday that the government has decided to amend laws to ban people from raising backyard poultry.

      The risk of cross contamination between wild birds and poultry has risen because of an increasing number of local birds and poultry testing positive for the H5N1 virus, he explained.


      Bird flu in Africa
      On the international front, a "highly pathogenic" strain of the H5N1 bird flu virus has been found on a large chicken farm in Nigeria the first reported case of the disease in Africa, the World Organization for Animal Health said yesterday.

      The deadly virus the same strain that has spread from Asia to Europe and the Middle East infected a farm in northern Kaduna state that has 46,000 birds, Alex Thiermann, an expert for the Paris-based organization, said.
      "We are really not dealing with a backyard operation," he said. He confirmed that it was Africa's first known bird flu case. "We are dealing with a new continent."

      All birds on the farm have been killed and their bodies disposed of, he said.

      http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english...ent_518410.htm
      Last edited by Clytie; February 12, 2006, 03:07 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        China reports human bird flu case

        http://www.ndtv.com/template/templat...84616&callid=1

        Thursday, February 9, 2006 (Beijing):


        China has said a 26-year-old woman in a south eastern province has contracted bird flu, becoming the country's 11th human case of the deadly virus.

        The Chinese Health Ministry confirmed that the woman in Fujian, who was surnamed Liu, tested posited for the H5N1 strain.

        Of the 10 previous human cases in China, seven have died.

        The official Xinhua news agency said there has been no outbreak of bird flu among birds detected in the area of Fujian's Zhangpu county, where the woman lived.

        The confirmation of the virus came the same day that authorities reported Africa's first cases of the H5N1 strain, in an outbreak on a poultry farm in Nigeria.

        Nigeria has ordered the quarantine and culling of any fowl suspected of carrying bird flu in hopes of halting its spread. (AP)

        Comment


        • #5
          35 suspected of bird flu in China

          http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au...5E1702,00.html


          35 suspected of bird flu in China
          From correspondents in Beijing
          February 10, 2006
          HEALTH authorities in northern China have placed 35 people under observation after 15,000 fowl died of bird flu on the farm where they were working, state media said today.

          The Xinhua news agency, citing government sources in Shanxi province, said the 35 workers had been confined to their homes in Yangquan city and were receiving twice-daily medical check-ups.

          Authorities have confirmed that the H5N1 strain of bird flu killed 15,000 head of poultry on their farm and said 187,745 more had been culled in the affected area to prevent the disease spreading.

          Yesterday, the health ministry announced China's 11th human case of bird flu. The 26-year-old woman, surnamed Lin, from the eastern province of Fujian, tested positive for H5N1 after being hospitalised with fever and pneumonia on January 10, but was in a stable condition, it said.

          Bird flu has killed seven people in China.









          The Fujian Daily reported today that Ms Lin was out of quarantine and expected to leave hospital soon.

          Like most of the other human cases in China, no outbreak among animals was detected in Zhangpu county where Ms Lin lived, emphasising the inability of authorities to effectively monitor the disease.

          The Fujian provincial agricultural department has collected 319 poultry samples within a three-kilometre radius of Ms Lin's home, but all have tested negative, the Fujian Daily said.

          Julie Hall, a Beijing-based World Health Organisation (WHO) expert, said that although the WHO was still awaiting information about what caused the latest human infection, the case appeared to have followed a familiar pattern.

          "What we've seen in quite a number of other cases in China is that the Ministry of Agriculture has not been able to identify viruses in the animals in that area," Ms Hall said.

          "But there certainly have been reports from the health authorities and patients themselves that animals in their areas have been dying and have been sick for some weeks prior to their onset of their illness."

          Ms Hall said she was not surprised by the latest case.

          "We believe the virus is endemic in parts of China and certainly endemic in the wild birds. Many poultry flocks in China remain vulnerable to infections."

          China has reported 34 H5N1 outbreaks among poultry since the beginning of last year, with most appearing since October.

          "We would anticipate that there would be a continued number of these types of cases, unfortunately, throughout the winter," Ms Hall said.

          The WHO says of the 165 confirmed cases of bird flu in humans detected since 2003, 88 people have died. Most of the victims have been in Asia, although four have died this year in Turkey and two in northern Iraq.

          The World Organisation for Animal Health confirmed yesterday H5N1 had been detected for the first time in Africa, wiping out 40,000 battery hens on a farm in northern Nigeria
          Last edited by Admin; February 12, 2006, 03:04 PM.
          A thing long expected takes the form of the unexpected when at last it comes. Mark Twain

          Comment


          • #6
            China is the home of bird flu

            China is the home of bird fluA MASSIVE analysis of flu viruses has finally confirmed what everyone suspected: the H5N1 virus has been circulating in Chinese poultry for over a decade.

            Yi Guan at Shantou University, China, and his colleagues studied samples from 13,000 migratory birds and 50,000 market poultry in south-east China between January 2004 and June 2005. They found H5N1 in around 2 per cent of apparently healthy ducks and geese, and also in some chickens.

            Most importantly, the virus's genes formed geographic clusters that differed slightly between the Chinese provinces of Guangdong, Hunan and Yunnan, suggesting that it must have been circulating long enough to have evolved into different strains.

            The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0511120103), pinpoints Guangdong and neighbouring Guangxi and Hunan provinces in south-eastern China as the probable source of the virus, as H5N1 there shows the most genetic variation. The virus then "colonised" other areas: viruses from Thailand and Vietnam are most similar to viruses from Guangdong, while Vietnam appears to have been repeatedly invaded by H5N1 from Guangxi province, most recently in 2005.

            In the past Chinese officials have insisted that H5N1 exists only in isolated cases in China, and did not necessarily originate there
            Last edited by Clytie : Today at 03:00 PM.
            Last edited by Admin; July 30, 2006, 05:46 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              China reports eighth flu death; says dead poultry might spread virus.


              Associated Press Writer
              BEIJING

              China has reported its eighth human death from bird flu and says researchers suspect contamination from dead poultry might be to blame for cases that have occurred in areas without outbreaks in birds.

              The latest death was a 20-year-old female farmer from the county of Suining in the southern province of Hunan, the Health Ministry said Friday on its Web site. It identified her only by the surname Long and said she had handled poultry.

              Long fell ill Jan. 27 and died Feb. 4, the ministry said. It said laboratory tests confirmed she had the virulent H5N1 flu strain, and said the results were reported to the World Health Organization.

              It was the second death reported this week, following an announcement Wednesday that a 26-year-old woman in an area with no reported outbreaks in poultry died of the H5N1 strain.

              The woman in Hunan was China's 12th bird flu case, and the government says one-third of them were in areas with no cases in poultry.

              "According to expert analysis, the reason for these cases is that poultry that died of the virus contaminated their surroundings," a ministry spokesman, Mao Chun'an, was quoted as saying by the official Xinhua News Agency.

              However, Mao was quoted as saying, "we still don't have precise information as to a specific channel for (spreading infection in) these human cases of bird flu."

              The report didn't give any other details.

              China has reported 29 bird flu outbreaks in poultry since October in areas throughout the country. The government has destroyed millions of chickens, ducks and other poultry to contain them.

              Also Friday, the government said 35 farm workers have been put under medical observation after an outbreak killed 15,000 birds on their farm in the northern city of Yangquan, in Shanxi province.

              The farm workers have been confined to their homes and are receiving medical checkups twice a day, Xinhua said, citing provincial officials.

              Authorities have destroyed 187,745 poultry within three kilometers (twomiles) of the farm in an effort to contain the outbreak, Xinhua said.

              http://english.ohmynews.com/articlev...73790&rel_no=1

              2006-02-11 21:47
              ©2006 OhmyNew

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: China: Background & Historical Reports

                There was a Boxun Report translated below that came out on Nov 15, 2005.

                (You must have Chinese figures installed on your computer to read the original.)

                Boxun Reports are published by journalists working under cover and at great risk in China. They are usually not verifiable by a second or third independent source, except over time as details reveal themselves. This group reported on the SARS outbreak in China 2-3 months before China admitted having a problem in 2003. It became clear in that case that their reporting was valid.

                This Boxun Avian Influenza Report was translated by Peterpan.

                Following release of this report, the Chinese government announced the first 3 deaths from bird flu in their country. One person knowledgeable of the SARS outbreak said that the actual numbers of deaths in China from SARS at any one time was 100 times what China reported to the West. I don't know if that's true, but at the time this report came out, China admitted to no deaths, in spite of the fact that North Vietnam had deaths and reported H5N1 having acquired genetic material that makes it more transmissible in humans. Following the release of the Boxun Report, China began reporting H5N1 infection and human deaths.

                Near the end of 2005, a world renowned virologist from Hong Kong took China to task for not releasing information and misrepresenting what was going on there. Soon after he withdrew his comment. Following that, a world renowned Japanese virologist made a statement during a retirement party for a colleague. He spoke of human-to-human transmissions and deaths he'd been told of in China on a visit with WHO. He later recanted. One wonders if these scientists were speaking the truth and changed their stories when pressure was brought to bear. Perhaps future findings will reveal the tryuh.

                Here's the translation: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                CHINA:


                Official from Ministry of Health Reveals 2005 Human Case Figures for Avian Influenza Outbreak in China

                Since 2004, China has been continually plagued by Avian Influenza outbreaks of varying degrees and unverified reports of infection. In 2005, some of these outbreaks attracted the attention of the outside world. However, these outbreaks are not as straightforward as what is perceived by the world at large. Due to the deployment of the PLA to the epidemic zones, the Chinese Ministry of Health has been able to gain some form of control and organisation over the dissemination of information to the rest of the world. And although they have ostensibly allowed the entry of external health experts into the epidemic zones to conduct their investigations, they will still be bound by arrangements and rules dictated by the Chinese and hence their perception of the situation there would not accurately reflect the actual events that had occurred.

                Currently, the Avian Influenza problem in China is very grave. Over the course of the outbreaks, Chinese officials have been briefed on the procedures to follow in order to control the outbreak the the spread of information. The Chinese Central Military Committee has directed that all suspect and confirmed cases of Avian Influenza infections be sent to specialized hospitals. Notifications must be sent to a higher centralized authority. They have also strictly prohibited any Chinese health officials to privately speak to the foreign media. If it is discovered that they have done so, they will be sacked immediately. There must be no mention made of the H5N1 virus in the cause of death of those who have succumbed to the virus. Patients who seek treatment for respiratory problems in non-designated hospitals will not be allowed to claim insurance or medical expenses.


                (The statistical model used appears to be almost the same as that used during the previous Shenzhen Ebola outbreak)

                The Original Boxun Table with 24 Provinces, ^^ indicates Human to Human transmission:

                Click image for larger version

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                Translated headings




                Province......Number....Number.....Number.......Nu mber....Transmission
                .................of..........Currently....Currentl y.....Missing.....Bird to Human/
                .................Dead......Infected.....Quarantine d...............Human to Human

                Qinghai..........143.......... 131..........961..........13..........B/H, H/H
                Xinjiang...........18............35..........340.. ..........6..........H/H,H/H
                Inner Mongolia..28.............9..........149........... ..2..........B/H, H/H
                Xichang............7............15..........177... ..........9..........B/H, H/H
                Sichuan..........................12...........39.. .......................B/H
                Hunan...............8.............4...........17.. .......................B/H, H/H
                Hubei..............25..........297.......1,524.... .........4..........B/H, H/H
                Guangdong........6............47...........66..... ........6..........B/H
                Fujian...............2...........13.............9. ............1...........B/H
                Jiangxi..............1...........................7 ..........................B/H
                Zhejiang........................................13 ........................
                Jiangsu..........................................2 1........................
                Hunan...........................................57 ........................
                Hebei............................................2 1........................
                Liaoning..........69...........237........2,076... .........2..........B/H, H/H
                Jilin...............................19............ 30.........................B/H
                Heilongjiang....................23..............9. ........................B/H
                Hainan............................................ 6..........................
                Yunnan............................3............... ..........................B/H
                Gansu...............1............................7 ..........................B/H
                Ningxia............................3.............. ...........................B/H
                Shaanxi.............2............................. ..........................B/H
                Shandong.......................................... .............4..........
                Anhui..............................6.............2 1.........................B/H
                Totals............310.........859.........5,504... .........37..........

                Although accurate till 12th November, these case figures are constantly changing. Also, since the cases figures have been collated by the Central State Council, they would have reduced it somewhat, and hence, the actual figures may be higher.

                Currently, the situation in China is severe. Human to human transmission has occurred and affected personnel have been quarantined for long periods. Death figures are noticeably higher in B-H transmission regions. The situation has been gradually brought under control although it still remains critical.
                These figures are thought to be cumulative totals to 12 November 2005, although the use of the present tense would suggest that the situation is on-going. B-H refers to transmission from bird to human, H-H refers to human to human transmission. The number quarantined is believed to refer to current number of people in quarantine. The number disappeared is thought to mean the number of people who have broken the quarantine.

                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                Last edited by Mellie; February 21, 2006, 09:51 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Taiwan: PRC hiding bird flu cases, says Chen

                  PRC hiding bird flu cases, says Chen

                  Taiwan News.

                  2006-02-24 / central news agency /


                  President Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) said yesterday that China has been concealing avian flu cases in the country, making it a "hole" in the global health protection net.In the president's latest e-letter posted on his Web site, Chen noted that from the start of 2003 to mid-February of this year, the World Health Organization confirmed a total of 169 cases of H5N1 infection in humans in China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Iraq, Thailand, Cambodia and Turkey, with 91 of the cases resulting in death.

                  Now, avian flu is spreading westward to Western Europe, Chen added.

                  According to Chen, the Chinese government confirmed a case of H5N1 infection in a woman in Fujian Province 28 days after the woman developed bird flu symptoms, much more than the 15 days required by the WHO to confirm a bird flu case.

                  "It is obvious that China has not learned a lesson from the SARS outbreak in 2003," Chen said.

                  China still covers up information about any pandemic in order to avoid "losing face, " Chen claimed, adding that Beijing only faces reality when the matter grows beyond its control.

                  The president said this attitude poses a serious threat to the health of the people in China, Taiwan and the rest of the world.


                  In addition to concealing information, China has spared no effort trying to obstruct Taiwan's efforts to join the WHO, thus creating another "hole" in the global health protection net, the president said.

                  Noting that disease knows no borders, Chen stressed that public health and disease prevention are topics that people around the world should address jointly in this era of globalization and liberalization.

                  However, for political reasons, the Chinese government has sacrificed the health of its people and isolated Taiwan in the global disease prevention system, Chen said, adding that this "is the international community's biggest regret."

                  During the last 400 years, there have been 12 major flu pandemics, with nine of these originating in China, while in the 20th century, there were three major flu pandemics, all of which began in China, the president said.

                  Noting that people should not be careless about bird flu cases in China, Chen said that the help of the Taiwan people is needed in the world's disease prevention efforts. He also noted that Taiwan's capabilities in disease prevention have been demonstrated by the fact that the island has been able to remain avian flu-free to date

                  http://www.etaiwannews.com/showPage....rea_code=00000

                  Last edited by Clytie; February 24, 2006, 06:23 PM. Reason: formatting only

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    China reports two new human cases of bird flu

                    Why is there nothing from China these days.

                    I find the silence disquieting. Don't you ?


                    You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.
                    Desiderata

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      China reports two new human cases of bird flu

                      http://www.breakingnews.ie/2006/02/25/story246445.html
                      China reports two new human cases of bird flu
                      25/02/2006 - 14:44:18

                      The Chinese government today reported two new human cases of the H5N1 strain of bird flu in a nine-year-old girl and a 26-year-old woman.

                      The girl lives in the south-eastern coastal province of Zhejiang and the woman is a farmer from Anhui province in the east, the official Xinhua News Agency said, citing the Health Ministry.

                      The report didnít say whether the woman worked with poultry or how the girl might have become infected.

                      The announcement raised the number of human cases of bird flu reported on Chinaís mainland to 14 since October, with eight deaths.

                      I hope this is not a dupe.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Too quiet in China

                        Yes, it always worries me too. There are two new cases reported today.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          China reports two new human cases of bird flu

                          http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/25/content_4227632.htm

                          BEIJING, Feb. 25 (Xinhuanet) -- The Ministry of Agriculture confirmed on Saturday one more bird flu outbreak in poultry in East China's Anhui Province.

                          The ministry said 13 chickens were found dead in Jitai Village of Yingshang Township when an expert team of the ministry went there for the inspection of bird flu prevention and control.
                          After preliminary analysis, the state avian flu lab confirmed on Feb. 25 that samples from four of the dead chickens tested positive for the H5N1 strain of highly pathogenic bird flu, said the ministry. Since the outbreak was reported, the local vets authorities have culled more than 200 poultry around the affected areas. The epidemic is now under control and no further spread is reported, said the ministry. Enditem

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: China reports two new human cases of bird flu

                            http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060225/3/2gg7l.html
                            Sunday February 26, 12:56 AM
                            China
                            [/B]</st1:country-region></st1:place> sees threat of "massive" bird flu outbreak<o:p></o:p>
                            SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China warned of the threat of a massive avian flu outbreak among birds in the country as it reported two new human cases of the virus, the official Xinhua news agency said on Saturday. <o:p></o:p>
                            Agriculture Minister Du Qinglin said <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:country-region w:st="on">China</st1:country-region></st1:place> culled 23 million fowl in 2005 as it sought to halt the spread of the disease. Of those, 163,000 were found to have the H5N1 strain of bird flu, Xinhua cited the minister as saying. <o:p></o:p>
                            Du said his ministry would stick to consistent epidemic monitoring, diagnosing and reporting, and strengthen poultry vaccinating and virus testing. <o:p></o:p>
                            "In view of the current situation, the possibility of a massive bird flu outbreak could not be ruled out," Du said, repeating a similar warning issued earlier this week when he said a big outbreak could occur in the spring. <o:p></o:p>
                            Chinese farmers raised about 15 billion poultry in 2005, or 21 percent of the world's total, Du said. <o:p></o:p>
                            Earlier on Saturday, Xinhua reported that two new human cases of bird flu had been diagnosed in the east of the country. <o:p></o:p>
                            A Chinese girl in eastern <st1:State w:st="on">Zhejiang</st1:State> province and a woman farmer in neighbouring <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:State w:st="on">Anhui</st1:State></st1:place> province were currently in critical condition, Xinhua cited the Ministry of Health as saying. <o:p></o:p>
                            The woman farmer, who was diagnosed on Feb. 11 with symptoms of fever and pneumonia, had come into contact with sick and dead poultry, Xinhua said. <o:p></o:p>
                            The girl, a nine-year-old from <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Anji</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">County</st1:PlaceType></st1:place>, had visited relatives who kept poultry but it was not clear how she had been infected, Xinhua said. <o:p></o:p>
                            <st1:country-region w:st="on">China</st1:country-region>'s Ministry of Health has reported the two new cases to the World Health Organisation, and to authorities in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:City w:st="on">Hong Kong</st1:City>, <st1:State w:st="on">Macao</st1:State>, <st1:country-region w:st="on">Taiwan</st1:country-region></st1:place> and other countries, Xinhua said. <o:p></o:p>
                            The latest cases brought the total number of human cases of bird flu in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:country-region w:st="on">China</st1:country-region></st1:place> to 14, Xinhua said. Eight of those have died while four have recovered, it said. <o:p></o:p>
                            <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:country-region w:st="on">China</st1:country-region></st1:place> has reported more than 30 outbreaks of the H5N1 strain of bird flu in both poultry and wild birds in a dozen provinces in the past year. <o:p></o:p>
                            Bird flu is highly contagious among poultry and can spread through an entire flock in hours. It remains difficult for humans to catch but has killed more than 90 people worldwide since late 2003. <o:p></o:p>
                            So far most human victims of the virus have had direct or indirect contact with infected birds, but there are fears the virus will mutate into a strain easily passed among people, causing a pandemic in which millions could die.

                            Last edited by Walter; February 25, 2006, 04:57 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: China reports two new human cases of bird flu

                              I will try the link again. I have no idea why that piece and url postred like that.
                              http://asia.news.yahoo.com/060225/3/2gg7l.html
                              Last edited by Walter; February 26, 2006, 06:31 PM. Reason: To try to tidy-up the link

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