Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Saskatchewan: Avian flu in wild birds 2022 - 2024

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Lance
    replied
    Canada - Influenza A viruses of high pathogenicity (Inf. with) (non-poultry including wild birds) (2017-) - Follow up report 1


    GENERAL INFORMATION

    COUNTRY/TERRITORY OR ZONE
    COUNTRY/TERRITORY

    ANIMAL TYPE
    TERRESTRIAL

    DISEASE CATEGORY
    Listed disease

    EVENT ID
    5582

    DISEASE
    Influenza A viruses of high pathogenicity (Inf. with) (non-poultry including wild birds) (2017-)

    CAUSAL AGENT
    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    GENOTYPE / SEROTYPE / SUBTYPE
    H5N1

    START DATE
    2024/01/01

    REASON FOR NOTIFICATION
    Recurrence of an eradicated disease

    DATE OF LAST OCCURRENCE
    2015/02/04

    CONFIRMATION DATE
    2024/01/15

    EVENT STATUS
    On-going

    END DATE- SELF-DECLARATION

    NO REPORT INFORMATION

    REPORT NUMBER
    Follow-up report 1

    REPORT ID
    FUR_166675

    REPORT REFERENCE- REPORT DATE
    2024/04/12

    REPORT STATUS
    Validated

    NO EVOLUTION REPORT

    EPIDEMIOLOGY

    SOURCE OF EVENT OR ORIGIN OF INFECTION
    • Contact with wild species
    EPIDEMIOLOGICAL COMMENTS
    This event is the continuation of event #4191 for reporting wild birds with high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. Outbreaks are reported by province/territory. The geographical marker is on the capital. Outbreaks of HPAI in domestic non-poultry are reported in Event Banks need to think about..... For detailed and current information on high pathogenicity avian influenza cases in wild birds, please consult : http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/avian_influenza.php. Wildlife surveillance as well as the Canadian Avian Influenza Surveillance System (CanNAISS) activities for poultry are ongoing in Canada. According to Article 10.4.1.4. of the Terrestrial Animal Health Code, Member Country should not impose bans on the international trade of poultry commodities in response to notification of infection with any Influenza A viruses in birds other than poultry.

    QUANTITATIVE DATA SUMMARY

    MEASURING UNIT
    Animal

    SpeciesSusceptibleCasesDeathsKilled and Disposed ofSlaughtered/ Killed for commercial useVaccinated Cooper's Hawk (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-3---- Wood Duck (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Northern Pintail (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- American wigeon (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-3---- Green-winged Teal (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-3---- Northern Shoveler (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Mallard (WILD)NEW-10----TOTAL-10---- American Black Duck (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Snow Goose (WILD)NEW-8----TOTAL-15---- Anserinae (unidentified) (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Ross's Goose (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Great Blue Heron (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Canada Goose (WILD)NEW-63----TOTAL-79---- Cackling Goose (WILD)NEW-8----TOTAL-8---- Snowy Owl (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Great Horned owl (WILD)NEW-4----TOTAL-12---- Red-tailed Hawk (WILD)NEW-9----TOTAL-9---- Dunlin (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- American crow (WILD)NEW-15----TOTAL-17---- Common Raven (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Blue jay (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Trumpeter Swan (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-4---- Peregrin falcon (WILD)NEW-4----TOTAL-4---- Bald Eagle (WILD)NEW-2----TOTAL-2---- Laridae (unidentified) (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Herring Gull (WILD)NEW-4----TOTAL-4---- Glaucous-winged Gull (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Great black-backed Gull (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Double-crested cormorant (WILD)NEW------TOTAL-1---- Black-billed Magpie (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-3---- Barred Owl (WILD)NEW-3----TOTAL-3---- Barn Owl (Common Barn-Owl) (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- Hooded Merganser (WILD)NEW-1----TOTAL-1---- American goshawk (WILD)NEW------TOTAL-1---- All speciesNEW-161----TOTAL-197----

    DIAGNOSTIC DETAILS

    CLINICAL SIGNS
    NO

    METHOD OF DIAGNOSTIC
    Diagnostic test
    Gene sequencing National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD), Winnipeg, Manitoba Great Horned owl,Snow Goose,Mallard,Ross's Goose,Cackling Goose,Herring Gull,Northern Shoveler,Black-billed Magpie,Red-tailed Hawk,Great Blue Heron,Great black-backed Gull,Glaucous-winged Gull,Dunlin,Bald Eagle,Barn Owl (Common Barn-Owl),Snowy Owl,Peregrin falcon,Laridae (unidentified),Barred Owl,Hooded Merganser,Common Raven,Anserinae (unidentified),Canada Goose,Blue jay,American Black Duck,Wood Duck,Double-crested cormorant,American wigeon,Trumpeter Swan,American goshawk,Northern Pintail,Green-winged Teal,American crow,Cooper's Hawk 10 2024/01/15 2024/03/28 Positive
    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD), Winnipeg, Manitoba Common Raven,Dunlin,Peregrin falcon,Anserinae (unidentified),Barn Owl (Common Barn-Owl),Hooded Merganser,Cooper's Hawk,Snow Goose,Wood Duck,Green-winged Teal,Canada Goose,American crow,Northern Pintail,Glaucous-winged Gull,Barred Owl,Red-tailed Hawk,Great Horned owl,American goshawk,Laridae (unidentified),American Black Duck,American wigeon,Cackling Goose,Mallard,Double-crested cormorant,Ross's Goose,Northern Shoveler,Black-billed Magpie,Trumpeter Swan,Herring Gull,Great Blue Heron,Snowy Owl,Great black-backed Gull,Blue jay,Bald Eagle 10 2024/01/15 2024/03/28 Positive
    NEW OUTBREAKS

    OB_133570 - NL-2024-HPAI-WB-1 - NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR - WILDBIRDS

    OB_133569 - NS-2024-HPAI-WB-1 - NOVA SCOTIA - WILDBIRDS

    OB_133568 - SK-2024-HPAI-WB-1 - SASKATCHEWAN - WILDBIRDS

    OB_133567 - NB-2024-HPAI-WB-1 - NEW BRUNSWICK - WILDBIRDS

    OB_133566 - BC-2024-HPAI-WB-1 - BRITISH COLUMBIA - WILDBIRDS



    https://wahis.woah.org/#/in-review/5582

    Leave a comment:


  • Pathfinder
    replied
    Translation Google

    Suspected cases of bird flu in foxes and skunks

    Skunks may have died of bird flu in Saskatchewan.

    Radio Canada
    at 7:15 a.m.

    Possible cases of bird flu have emerged in mammals in Saskatchewan, according to pathologist at the Western Veterinary College in Saskatoon, Trent Bollinger.

    According to him, the first suspected case of bird flu in a large carnivore was brought to his laboratory three weeks ago.

    As of last week, between 6 and 10 other animals had been tested.

    It was mostly skunks, as well as a red fox, that showed neurological signs that could be attributed to avian flu , he says.

    Trent Bollinger notes that other viral illnesses cause similar symptoms, such as distemper or rabies.

    However, recent molecular diagnostic tests point to avian flu as the most likely cause in at least three of the deaths analyzed.

    In other cases, we have done autopsies and we are continuing the analyses. There could therefore be more cases , specifies the veterinary pathologist.

    The transmission of the virus to mammals does not surprise the specialist. Cases have also appeared in the United States, he says. But we have quite a few, which may be a little unusual. That remains to be seen.

    Deaths throughout the summer

    Trent Bollinger expects more waterfowl to die from bird flu over the summer, as the risk of transmission is high in these bird species.

    There were a large number of dead birds in the spring, during the migration season. But while the specialist expects the mortality of these birds to decrease during the summer, he notes that the baby birds are however another group at risk.

    We will have new cohorts of ducklings and juvenile birds that could also be exposed to the virus, he says. So we could see yet again an increase in the number of dead birds observed by the public.

    According to Trent Bollinger, the species most affected by the virus seem to be in relatively high numbers, and the mortality rate does not currently have a significant impact on their populations.

    What is especially worrying is the risk of transmission to poultry, because then the birds die in large numbers and the virus has economic impacts , he recalls.

    The veterinarian is reassuring: the virus of this flu is not transmitted to dogs, cats and humans.

    What to do

    Trent Bollinger reminds you to avoid touching animals whose behavior is not normal, and contact a wildlife conservation officer.

    If the animal in question dies and avian flu may be the cause, Trent Bollinger says the carcass can be picked up wearing latex gloves, put in a plastic bag and taken to a lab, like that of the College of Veterinarians.

    With information by Daniella Ponticelli

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiloh
    replied
    Source: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/presumptiv...100000527.html

    Presumptive cases of avian flu in skunks, foxes found in Sask.
    Sun, May 29, 2022, 6:00 a.m.·2 min read

    Presumptive cases of avian flu are showing up in some species of mammals in Saskatchewan.

    Trent Bollinger is a wildlife pathologist at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon.

    He told CBC News the first presumptive case of avian flu in a "major carnivore" came into the lab about three weeks ago.

    As of the last week, six to ten more have been tested.

    "These are primarily skunks, with the occasional red fox, that have neurological signs which could be attributed to (high pathogenic) avian influenza virus," he said.

    Bollinger noted there are other viral diseases — such as distemper and rabies — that cause similar symptoms in these species...

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiloh
    replied
    Source: https://regina.ctvnews.ca/extra-vigi...reak-1.5859247


    'Extra vigilant': Sask. poultry farmers increase safety measures in light of avian flu outbreak
    Allison Bamford
    Video journalist at CTV News Regina
    Updated April 12, 2022 8:21 p.m. EDT
    Published April 12, 2022 4:27 p.m. EDT

    Deadly avian influenza has been detected in Saskatchewan for the first time in 15 years.

    A snow goose near the town of Elrose, around 320 km northwest of Regina, was found to have the “highly pathogenic” H5 strain of avian influenza (HPAI) by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

    Veterinary pathologist Trent Bollinger performed the autopsy in Saskatoon.

    Since then, he said his lab at the University of Saskatchewan has done tests on upwards of 50 birds believed to have died from HPAI. The number of unreported deaths is even higher, he said...

    Leave a comment:


  • sharon sanders
    replied
    bump this

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiloh
    started a topic Saskatchewan: Avian flu in wild birds 2022 - 2024

    Saskatchewan: Avian flu in wild birds 2022 - 2024

    Source: https://www.sasktoday.ca/central/loc...chewan-5248265

    Avian influenza detected in Saskatchewan
    The last time HPAI was found in Saskatchewan in either commercial poultry or wild birds was in 2007
    SASKTODAY.ca
    about an hour ago

    REGINA — Samples collected from a snow goose found near Elrose have been confirmed positive for HPAI by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

    The Ministry of Agriculture is reminding poultry producers with flocks of all sizes to follow all necessary biosecurity protocols to keep their flocks free of diseases after a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 strain was detected in a wild bird in Saskatchewan.

    The confirmation of the strain in the Saskatchewan bird follows the detection of HPAI in poultry and wild birds in the United States and in several Canadian provinces.

    The last time HPAI was found in Saskatchewan in either commercial poultry or wild birds was in 2007...
Working...
X