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  • Canada - LPAI H5 Confirmed on 2nd Turkey Farm

    THE CANADIAN PRESS
    Several poultry farms in B.C.'s Fraser Valley are under quarantine as officials investigate a possible outbreak of avian influenza.
    B.C. Poultry Association spokesman Calvin Bruekelman says the Canadian Food Inspection Agency imposed the quarantine on farms within a three-kilometre radius of one turkey producer in Abbotsford, B.C. He says tests are underway after antibodies for avian flu were found in some 12-week-old turkeys at E&H Farms.
    Last edited by Laidback Al; May 23, 2012, 10:47 PM. Reason: removed broken link
    CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

    treyfish2004@yahoo.com

  • #2
    Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

    Early testing suggests possible H5 avian influenza outbreak on B.C. farm: CFIA
    13 minutes ago



    By The Canadian Press


    ABBOTSFORD, B.C. - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it is investigating the possibility of an H5 avian influenza outbreak on a turkey farm in B.C.'s Fraser Valley.


    Agency spokesperson Monika Mazur says testing done at the B.C. provincial laboratory suggests the presence of an H5 virus but more tests are being done for confirmation at CFIA's national laboratory in Winnipeg.


    Mazur says it's not yet known if the virus is of a high or low pathogenic strain and further testing must be done to determine what the virus's N or neuraminidase type is.


    Mazur says the initial testing was done after turkeys on a 50,000 bird farm showed signs of respiratory distress.


    Several farms within a three-kilometre radius of the turkey producer in Abbotsford, B.C., have been placed under the quarantine.


    Mazur says the CFIA is informing the World Organization for Animal Health. Any outbreak of avian influenza involving H5 or H7 strains must be reported to the Paris-based organization.


    The presence of H5 virus, if it is confirmed, does not mean there is an outbreak with the H5N1 virus that has killed nearly 250 people in parts of Asia, Africa and Europe.


    There are multiple subtypes of H5 avian flu. In fact, the Fraser Valley experienced an H5N2 outbreak in November 2005.


    B.C. Poultry Association spokesman Calvin Bruekelman says blood samples from the birds at E&H Farms tested positive for avian flu antibodies.


    "That doesn't necessarily mean they're diseased with it," Bruekelman says. "It could be that they just have antibodies in the blood."


    "There's nothing to be concerned about at this point," Bruekelman added, pointing out tests were expected back as soon as Friday. "Then we'll know for sure. If we need to act on it then we we'll have to depopulate the flock."


    He said the quarantine was in place simply as a precaution.


    Seventeen million birds were slaughtered in the Fraser Valley in February 2004 following an outbreak of H7N3, a different avian influenza subtype.

    http://chealth.canoe.ca/channel_heal..._id=1020&rot=3
    Last edited by Gert van der Hoek; January 23, 2009, 02:47 PM. Reason: link

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

      Bird flu outbreak feared in Abbotsford

      http://www.vancouversun.com/Health/B...181/story.html

      By By AMY O'BRIAN, Vancouver SunJanuary 23, 2009 11:34 AM



      Bio-hazard clad workers clean barn that contained chickens in April 2004 outbreak of avian flu in the Fraser Valley.
      Photograph by: Glenn Baglo, Vancouver Sun FilesMETRO VANCOUVER - Poultry farms within a three-kilometre radius of a large turkey farm in Abbotsford are under quarantine as the Canadian Food Inspection Agency investigates a possible outbreak of avian flu.

      About 23 farmers in the area are awaiting test results, which are expected later today, to confirm or deny the re-appearance of avian flu in the Fraser Valley.

      An outbreak in 2004 resulted in the cull of about 17 million birds in the region.

      It was the largest animal cull in Canadian history.

      No one from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency was immediately available for comment this morning, but Ray Nickel, chair of the B.C. Poultry Association said test results are expected back from a lab in Winnipeg later today.

      Nickel said the quarantine was put in place late Wednesday, and prevents farms from moving any product until it?s tested and cleared.

      He said the turkey farm at the centre of the quarantine has about 50,000 birds and is larger than most.

      "The producer in question had some birds he was concerned about, respiratory-wise. The tests came back that they found a suspect (Avian influenza.)"

      Nickel said the CFIA and the poultry farms in the valley have been working well together, following proper procedures and protocol.

      He said there is no risk to humans and that the poultry and eggs on store shelves at this time is safe to eat.

      "This has nothing to do with human health or product contamination. It is only about bird infections.?

      More to come.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

        23 B.C. farms quarantined

        Officials testing for Avian influenza

        By Becky Rynor, Canwest News ServiceJanuary 23, 2009 11:40 AM



        The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has quarantined one turkey farm in B.C. and has put a 'restriction movement' order on a number of others within a three kilometre circle of the suspect farm.
        Photograph by: Ian Lindsay, Vancouver SunApproximately 23 farms in the Abbotsford area have been placed under quarantine and are undergoing testing after a possible case of Avian influenza may have been detected, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Friday.


        "We are investigating the possibility that an H5 Avian influenza strain is present at a commercial poultry operation in the Fraser Valley," said a spokeswoman for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.


        Monika Mazur said samples were submitted to a provincial lab "after some respiratory problems were observed in the flock" of one farm in the Abbotsford area.


        She said those samples are now with a CFIA-accredited lab in Winnipeg for additional testing and confirmation.


        "Depending on the sample quality, the initial results regarding the confirmation of the H5 could be expected as early as (Friday,)" she said.


        As a precaution, that farm and an adjacent poultry operation, involving about 50,000 birds, have been placed under quarantine as well as all farms within a three-kilometre radius of the suspect farm. She did not know how many of those farms were also poultry operations.


        The president of the B.C. Poultry Association, Ray Nickel said "the other surrounding farms will be allowed to move product, do their normal business subject to a test that shows their flocks are clean."


        Nickel said "this has nothing to do with human health or product contamination. It is only about bird infections."


        However, he said it brings back some bad memories of an Avian influenza outbreak in 2004 when a "highly pathogenetic" H7N3 strain of the disease broke out and millions of birds had to be destroyed.


        According to the CFIA website, Avian influenza, or AI, is a contagious viral infection caused by the influenza virus Type "A", which can affect several species of food producing birds, pet birds and wild birds. The viruses can be classified as low pathogenic and high pathogenic forms based on the severity of the illness in the birds.


        Mazur said "human illness caused by Avian influenza is rare, unless the humans have been in close contact with infected birds."

        http://www.canada.com/topics/news/story.html?id=1211174
        Last edited by Diane Morin; January 23, 2009, 03:02 PM. Reason: link

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

          H5 and symptoms is not a good combination.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

            The Source and Means of Spread of the Avian Influenza Virus in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia During an Outbreak in the Winter of 2004An Interim Report
            February 15, 2005
            Dr. Christine Power
            Animal Disease Surveillance Unit
            Canadian Food Inspection Agency

            [emphasis added]



            Executive Summary

            During the winter and spring of 2004, an avian influenza outbreak occurred in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia. Over a three month period, approximately 13.6 million commercial poultry and 18 thousand backyard birds were destroyed as part of disease control measures implemented by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Most of the commercial poultry were broilers from uninfected flocks and went directly to slaughter at maturity to be used for human consumption. While 42 commercial operations were found infected, constituting 5% of the operations in the Valley, a wider cull of 410 non infected poultry flocks took place which affected more than half of the producers in the region. The economic impact of this outbreak on the livelihoods of British Columbia (BC) poultry producers and the associated support industries was severe and recovery is expected to be protracted. Fortunately, the avian influenza subtype causing disease in the region had minimal effects on persons living in the area or those working directly with infected poultry. Only two confirmed cases of mild conjunctivitis were reported in disease control workers directly in contact with infected birds over the outbreak time span.

            The outbreak of high pathogenicity avian influenza (H7N3) is thought to be caused by a mutation from a low pathogenicity avian influenza strain. The low pathogenicity virus circulated in one barn of an Abbotsford broiler breeder flock and became highly pathogenic as it moved to an adjacent flock on the same premises. Once a flock becomes infected with a high pathogenicity strain, sufficient virus is shed into the localized environment to make biocontainment difficult. The disease spread quickly in the Abbotsford area for two main reasons. Many flocks were not protected by acceptable on- farm biosecurity practices and with regular traffic on farms, transfer of dust from contaminated premises was made possible leading to disease transmission to these flocks. A second reason for the rapid spread of disease from flock to flock is thought to be through aerosolized dust emitted from poultry barns. The opportunity for air exchange between barns was highest in the poultry farm dense areas of the Lower Fraser Valley where barns were within several hundred metres of one another. The Agency, along with other stakeholders, may have contributed passively to the spread of avian influenza in the Lower Fraser Valley due to the time between detection of disease and the destruction and disposal of infected birds. The processes of disease detection, flock euthanasia and carcass disposal required significant human and material resource acquisition, inter department dialogue and problem solving, logistical planning, and communications in order to be implemented on the short notice demanded by the crisis.

            The biggest vulnerabilities of the British Columbia poultry industry which contributed to this outbreak were the low level of biosecurity practised by some poultry sectors coupled with the very high density of poultry farms in the region. To address these weaknesses, all BC poultry sectors should develop and encourage their producers to implement comprehensive biosecurity programs. These programs should be established according to principles practised by Canadian poultry breeders of high security primary and multiplier flocks. The current evidence for the potential for windborne dispersal of avian influenza suggests that development of an air inlet filtration system for barns would be prudent in the event of a second outbreak. Municipal bylaws for land use could be reviewed in light of the outbreak with a view to restricting permits for new commercial operations when deemed too close to existing farms.

            http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/...rep/epie.shtml

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

              Canada Strengthens Poultry Avian Influenza Surveillance

              OTTAWA, June 6, 2008 ? The Government of Canada is committed to protecting the health of Canada's domestic poultry flocks from avian influenza (AI) viruses. That is why this Government is enhancing its AI surveillance for commercial poultry flocks in Canada.

              This program is one of a number of domestic and international initiatives that have been implemented to prevent, detect and eliminate the presence of harmful AI viruses in Canada's domestic poultry flock. The expanded program was developed in collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, poultry farmers and other industry representatives.

              The enhanced Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System (CanNAISS) has been designed to meet current guidelines from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and new requirements from the European Union that take effect in January 2009. The system will provide information about NAI viruses in Canada's domestic poultry flocks that will be required for Canadian poultry farmers and processors to continue doing business internationally.

              While most AI viruses pose little or no animal health risk, two subtypes, known as H5 and H7, may lead to serious illness in birds. CanNAISS testing will identify poultry farms where these viruses may be present and enable the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and farmers to control potential disease spread.

              More information about CanNAISS will be made available on the CFIA Web site as the implementation details are finalized.

              http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/...0080606e.shtml

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                Birds tested for avian influenza in Western Canada
                23 Jan 2009 21:07:23 GMT
                <!-- 23 Jan 2009 21:07:23 GMT ## for search indexer, do not remove -->Source: Reuters

                <!-- AN5.0 article title end --><SCRIPT language=JavaScript src="/bin/js/article.js"></SCRIPT></SPAN><INPUT id=CurrentSize type=hidden value=13 name=CurrentSize> <!-- Birds tested for avian influenza in Western Canada --><!-- Reuters -->VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Jan 23 (Reuters) - Canadian authorities investigated a possible outbreak of avian influenza in British Columbia on Friday after signs of the disease were found in several turkeys.
                A precautionary quarantine was placed on poultry farms within 3 km (2 miles) of a farm east of Vancouver while tests are conducted to determine if the birds have the disease, a spokeswoman for the Canada Food Inspection Agency said.
                "We have not confirmed anything. We're still awaiting the test results," Monika Mazur said.
                The initial test results could be ready by late Friday, although it could be a couple more days before all the results are known, Mazur said.
                The testing was conducted after the turkey farm discovered respiratory illnesses in its flock.
                The farm is in the Fraser River valley, an area where most of British Columbia's poultry production is located. The area has had outbreaks of bird flu before, the largest of which required several million birds to be culled in 2004.
                Nearly all poultry raised in the area is produced for the local domestic market. (Reporting Allan Dowd, editing by Rob Wilson)

                http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N23323611.htm
                <!-- news ## for search indexer, do not remove -->

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                  Originally posted by niman View Post
                  H5 and symptoms is not a good combination.

                  "There are multiple subtypes of H5 avian flu."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                    Originally posted by Florida1 View Post
                    "There are multiple subtypes of H5 avian flu."
                    Most don't cause symptoms.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                      Source: http://www.canada.com/nanaimodailyne...tml?id=1211181

                      Bird flu outbreak feared in Abbotsford
                      AMY O'BRIAN, Vancouver Sun
                      Published: Friday, January 23, 2009

                      METRO VANCOUVER -

                      METRO VANCOUVER - Poultry farms within a three-kilometre radius of a large turkey farm in Abbotsford are under quarantine as the Canadian Food Inspection Agency investigates a possible outbreak of avian flu.

                      Farmers at more than 20 commercial farms in the area are awaiting test results, which are expected later today, to confirm or deny the re-appearance of avian flu in the Fraser Valley.

                      No one from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency was available for comment this morning, but Ray Nickel, of the B.C. Poultry Association, said test results are expected back from a lab in Winnipeg later today.

                      Nickel said the quarantine was put in place late Wednesday, and prevents farms from moving any product until it's tested and cleared.

                      He said the turkey farm at the centre of the quarantine has about 50,000 birds and is larger than most.

                      It has been identified as E & H Farms on Lefeuvre Road.

                      Dr. Perry Kendall, provincial health officer, said even if the test does come back positive it is very unlikely the flu strain will be of the Asian variety, which has been responsible for more than 250 human deaths over the past five years.

                      "I would bet strongly against it being the Asian strain," Kendall said. "We've never had that strain in North America."


                      Kendall said there was minimal avian flu activity last season, but it has re-surfaced this season in China, Indonesia, Egypt, Vietnam and Cambodia.

                      After the 2004 avian flu outbreak in B.C., Kendall said it was luck that prevented the flu from spreading to pigs and humans.

                      But he said Friday that the public health protocols and procedures have been improved since then. If test results come back positive, Kendall said the birds at the farm will likely be culled.

                      He said two barns of birds are possibly affected.

                      Kendall said only one worker at the farm will have to undergo anti-viral treatment if the test comes back positive.

                      There is no risk to the general population, he said.


                      Nickel said the CFIA and the poultry farms in the valley have been working well together, following proper procedures and protocol.

                      He said there is no risk to humans and that the poultry and eggs on store shelves at this time is safe to eat. Liz Bicknell, spokeswoman with the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, said the farm in question has been diligent about biosecurity.

                      "This particular farm we're dealing with right now, their biosecurity measures are impeccable - they are very, very high," Bicknell said.


                      An outbreak in 2004 resulted in the cull of about 17 million birds in the region.

                      It was the largest animal cull in Canadian history.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                        Originally posted by niman View Post
                        Most don't cause symptoms.
                        Isn't one of the symptoms "death"?


                        An outbreak of H5N2 in Taiwan late 2008-

                        "...The first suspected case of avian flu surfaced Oct. 21 when several hundred chickens on a farm in southern Kaohsiung County's Luchu Township died from unknown causes. In addition to immediately quarantining the site, all 76 poultry farms within a radius of three kilometers were disinfected and placed under observation.."

                        http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...8&postcount=19

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                          Originally posted by Florida1 View Post
                          Isn't one of the symptoms "death"?


                          An outbreak of H5N2 in Taiwan late 2008-

                          "...The first suspected case of avian flu surfaced Oct. 21 when several hundred chickens on a farm in southern Kaohsiung County's Luchu Township died from unknown causes. In addition to immediately quarantining the site, all 76 poultry farms within a radius of three kilometers were disinfected and placed under observation.."

                          http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...8&postcount=19
                          The symptoms cited were "respiratory distress" (kinda like "breathing difficulties). Nothing about recovery.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                            B.C. turkey farm quarantined

                            Other farms tested amid fears of bird flu
                            Canwest News Service Published: Friday, January 23, 2009

                            <SCRIPT type=text/javascript> try{ var arr_da = document.getElementById('ad-leaderboard').getElementsByTagName('script'); for(var i in arr_da){ if(typeof(arr_da[i].src) != 'undefined' && (/http:\/\/ad\.ca\.doubleclick\.net/.test(arr_da[i].src))){ var str_da_src = arr_da[i].src; str_da_src = str_da_src.replace(/loc=\w+;/gi, 'loc=microbar;'); str_da_src = str_da_src.replace(/sz=\d+x\d+;/gi, 'sz=88x31;'); str_da_src = str_da_src.replace(/ptile=\d+;/gi, 'ptile=4;'); document.write('<script type="text/javascript" src="' + str_da_src + '"><\/script>'); break; } } }catch(e){} </SCRIPT><SCRIPT type=text/javascript src="http://ad.ca.doubleclick.net/N3081/adj/npo.com/news/story;loc=microbar;sz=88x31;ptile=4;dcopt=ist;kw=r on;kw=news;kw=npo;ord=47471322?"></SCRIPT>


                            Ian Lindsay

                            The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has quarantined one turkey farm in B.C. and has put a 'restriction movement' order on a number of others within a three kilometre circle of the suspect farm.

                            ABBOTSFORD, B.C. - Testing began Friday on approximately 23 farms in B.C.'s Fraser Valley after a suspected case of Avian influenza was found on a turkey farm near Abbotsford.
                            "There's a suspect farm in the Abbotsford area that has been quarantined," the president of the B.C. Poultry Association, Ray Nickel said Friday. "It's a turkey farm. The producer in question had some birds he was concerned about, respiratory-wise. The tests came back that they found a suspect (Avian influenza.")
                            The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has quarantined that operation and has put a "restriction movement" order on a number of others within a three kilometre circle of the suspect farm, Mr. Nickel said.
                            "The other surrounding farms will be allowed to move product, do their normal business subject to a test that shows their flocks are clean," he said.
                            Mr. Nickel said "this has nothing to do with human health or product contamination. It is only about bird infections."
                            However, he said it brings back some bad memories of an Avian influenza outbreak in 2004 when a "highly pathogenetic" H7N3 strain of the disease broke out and 2.3 million birds had to be destroyed.http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?id=1211371
                            Last edited by AlaskaDenise; February 28, 2009, 08:24 PM. Reason: remove photo
                            CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                            treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: B.C. poultry farms quarantined by suspected outbreak of avian influenza

                              Source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl.../National/home

                              Early tests suggests possible bird flu outbreak on B.C. farm



                              The Canadian Press

                              January 23, 2009 at 5:12 PM EST

                              ABBOTSFORD, B.C. ? The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating the possibility of an H5 avian influenza outbreak on a commercial turkey farm in British Columbia's Fraser Valley, the agency confirmed Friday.

                              Several farms within a three-kilometre radius of the turkey producer in Abbotsford, B.C., have been placed under quarantine, agency spokesperson Monika Mazur said.

                              Testing done at the B.C. provincial laboratory suggests the presence of H5 viruses, Ms. Mazur said. Samples have been sent to CFIA's national lab in Winnipeg for confirmatory testing.

                              ?Depending on the sample quality, the initial results regarding the confirmation of the avian influenza could be expected as early as today,? Mazur said from Ottawa on Friday.

                              The initial testing was done after turkeys on a 50,000 bird farm showed signs of respiratory distress.

                              If the Winnipeg lab confirms the presence of H5 viruses, additional tests will be needed to identify the virus's neuraminidase subtype ? the N in a flu virus's name ? and whether the virus is of high or low pathogenicity.

                              Low path viruses, as they are called, typically only lead to a drop in egg production. But high path viruses are dreaded in poultry operations because they can wipe out whole flocks. And the birds that don't die must be culled to extinguish the outbreak.


                              In 2004, 17 million birds died or were destroyed in an outbreak caused by a high path H7N3 virus in the Fraser Valley.

                              Ms. Mazur said it would be a couple of days before the full specifics of the virus type would be known.

                              The presence of H5 virus, if it is confirmed, does not mean there is an outbreak of the H5N1 virus that has killed nearly 250 people in parts of Asia, Africa and Europe. There are multiple subtypes of H5 avian flu. In fact, the Fraser Valley experienced an H5N2 outbreak in November 2005.

                              Even within H5N1 viruses there are different lineages or families of viruses. The one which has wrecked such havoc in Asia and parts of Africa has so far not been found in North America.

                              ?We have no evidence that it's the Eurasian lineage (virus),? said influenza expert Dr. Danuta Skowronski of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.

                              ?And given what's been found previously in North America, it's most likely the North American lineage.?

                              Regardless of the virus type, workers will be taking full precautions if a cull of the birds on the farm is ordered, Dr. Skowronski said.

                              That means wearing protective gear. Workers would also be offered antiviral medication to prevent infection and flu shots to lower the risk that they might get simultaneously infected with human and bird flu viruses. That type of co-infection could give rise to a hybrid virus with the potential to cause a flu pandemic.

                              ?You don't mess around with avian influenza viruses,? Dr. Skowronski said. ?You take all precautions.?

                              A spokesperson for the B.C. Poultry Association said blood samples from the birds at E&H Farms tested positive for avian flu antibodies.

                              ?That doesn't necessarily mean they're diseased with it,? Calvin Bruekelman said. ?It could be that they just have antibodies in the blood.?

                              Mr. Bruekelman said the quarantine was a precaution and no additional action is needed until the confirmatory test results are available.


                              Ms. Mazur said the CFIA would inform the World Organization for Animal Health of the findings. Any outbreak of avian influenza involving H5 or H7 strains must be reported to the Paris-based organization, because those two subtypes can produce high path viruses.

                              Confirmation of an H5 or an H7 outbreak would likely lead to some countries closing their doors to poultry imports from the affected area.

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