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Bangladesh to help make bird flu vaccine H9N2 H5N1

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  • Bangladesh to help make bird flu vaccine H9N2 H5N1

    Sun, Sep 18th, 2011 9:24 pm BdST



    Dhaka, Sep 18 (bdnews24.com) – Bangladesh will share a new strain of bird flu virus, identified as a possible pandemic threat, with US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC) to develop 'seed virus,' key ingredient to make a vaccine in emergency.

    "We will share the vaccine for scientific use," health secretary Muhammad Humayun Kabir told bdnews24.com on Sunday as he confirmed about the sharing of the H9N2 strain of bird flu—A/Bangladesh/0994/2011 (H9N2).

    The strain was found in humans in March and recently confirmed by US CDC after its sequencing.

    The Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research (IEDCR) has detected the virus, mild in nature, through its countrywide surveillance.

    "But it has the potential to be a pandemic threat," IEDCR director Prof Mahmudur Rahman said, sounding the alarm, as the virus can reassort with H5N1—also 'widespread' in the country—with its changing strains.

    "If clades 2.2; 3.2 of H5N1 and new H9N2 mutate, it can be devastating," he said, "but nothing can be predicted about virus."


    The United Nations warned Bangladesh on Aug 29 of a possible major resurgence of bird flu as it observed a mutant strain of the H5N1 virus is spreading in Asia and elsewhere.

    The IEDCR director suggested maintaining bio-security in poultry farms that livestock officials said cannot be ensured due to 'a large number of backyard poultry in Bangladesh.'

    "But we are taking new strategies for backyard poultry," Dr Md Mehedi Hossain, senior scientific officer, Department of Livestock Services (DLS), said on Sunday at a seminar jointly organised by IEDCR and Unicef at IEDCR office.

    According to IEDCR, the government would share the virus under standard procedure of virus sharing coordinated by the World Health Organization.

    "We will get access to affordable vaccines derived from them and other technical support in exchange (for the new strain of virus)," Prof Rahman said.

    "They (US CDC) approached us in the first week of September for government permission to use the virus. They already have the virus with them as we have sent it for confirmation."

    He said the virus is also circulating in some countries, but in Bangladesh it is different.

    The DLS scientist said they would prepare a guideline for backyard poultry.

    "We will sensitise backyard farmers about how to dispose of debris and faeces," Dr Hossain said and added that people litter chickens' giblets and dead chickens just anywhere that can spread the virus.

    "Crows eat those carcasses and can get the virus and die. Those dead crows can again pass the virus to poultry birds in the same way," Dr Hossain explained.

    The livestock department has culled over 2.4 million chickens across the country after the first outbreak in Mar 22, 2007.

    Some 524 outbreaks have been recorded so far.

    "We observe that we cannot control the virus until we make people aware, we motivate them," said Dr Musaddique Hossain, a director of the DLS.

    The IEDCR advised people consume well-cooked poultry products and maintain personal hygiene - cough into the crook of elbow and wash hands with soap often - to keep bird flu infection away.

    The WHO estimates 18,000 deaths in 2009 H1N1 pandemic when the IEDCR recorded eight deaths in Bangladesh.



    http://www.bdnews24.com/details.php?id=206410&cid=13
    CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

    treyfish2004@yahoo.com

  • #2
    Re: Bangladesh to help make bird flu vaccine H9N2 H5N1

    U.S. to help Bangladesh combat bird flu

    Bird flu, also known as Avian flu virus H5N1often causes pandemic threat in the Asian region, including Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia and Vietnam.

    <TABLE style="WIDTH: 630px" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD style="WIDTH: 75px"></TD><TD style="WIDTH: 225px"></TD><!-- IF reporter --><TD style="WIDTH: 75px"></TD><TD style="WIDTH: 225px">Saleem Samad</TD><!-- ENDIF reporter --></TR><TR><!-- IF dateline --><TD style="WIDTH: 75px"></TD><TD style="WIDTH: 225px"></TD><!-- ENDIF dateline --><TD style="WIDTH: 75px">Published:</TD><TD style="WIDTH: 225px">September 19, 2011 12:25 pm EDT</TD></TR><TR><TD style="WIDTH: 75px"></TD><TD colSpan=3></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript> document.getElementById('mine').src = "/newsmap?point=&zoom=6";</SCRIPT><!-- This article Copyright AHN Media -->Bangladesh has accepted an offer from the United States to combat the bird flu virus by developing "seed virus," a key ingredient to make a vaccine in an emergency.
    Bangladesh will share a new strain of bird flu virus with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop the virus for scientific use, confirmed health secretary Muhammad Humayun Kabir on Sunday.
    Bird flu, also known as avian flu virus H5N1, often causes an pandemic threat in the Asian region, including Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia and Vietnam.
    United Nations agency FAO in August said the contagious avian flu remains firmly entrenched in Bangladesh because of unhygienic trade practices. The UN body warned of a possible major resurgence of bird flu as FAO observed a mutant strain of the H5N1 virus was spreading in Asia.
    The CDC approached health authorities in the first week of September for government authorization to use the virus.
    The strain was found in humans last March and detected by the Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), but countrywide surveillance had determined it was mild in nature. This was recently confirmed by the CDC.
    Bangladesh experienced 524 recorded Avian flu outbreaks and the livestock department culled over 2.4 million chickens across the country after the first outbreak in March 2007.
    According to the World Health Organization, factors responsible for the entrenchment of the virus are complex production and market chains. Eliminating the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus from poultry in the Asian countries will take 10 or more years, it cautioned.http://www.allheadlinenews.com/artic...t%20bird%20flu
    CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

    treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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