[Source: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]


Targeted nasal vaccination provides antibody independent protection against Staphylococcus aureus

Karen Misstear 1,*, Edel A. McNeela 1,*, Alison G. Murphy 2,*, Joan A. Geoghegan 3, Kate M. O'Keeffe 2, John Fox 4, Kin Chan 4, Simon Heuking 5, Nicolas Collin 5, Timothy J. Foster 3, Rachel M. McLoughlin 2,? and Ed C. Lavelle 1,6,?

<CITE><ABBR>J Infect Dis.</ABBR> (2013) doi: 10.1093/infdis/jit636 / </CITE>First published online: November 22, 2013

Author Affiliations: <SUP>1</SUP>Adjuvant Research Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland <SUP>2</SUP>Host pathogen interactions group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland <SUP>3</SUP>Microbiology Department, Moyne Institute of Preventive Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland <SUP>4</SUP>Merrion Pharmaceuticals Ltd, 3200 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24 <SUP>5</SUP>Vaccine Formulation Laboratory, University of Lausanne, Department of Biochemistry, Chemin des Boveresses 155, 1066 Epalinges, Switzerland <SUP>6</SUP>Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Corresponding author:Ed Lavelle, Ph.D. Adjuvant Research Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. Email: lavellee@tcd.ie, Phone: +353-1-896 2488. Fax: +353-1-677 2400

* denotes equal contribution.

? denotes equal contribution.


Abstract

Despite showing promise in preclinical models, anti-S.aureus vaccines have failed in clinical trials. To date, approaches have focused on neutralizing/opsonising antibodies, however, vaccines exclusively inducing cellular immunity have not been studied to formally test if a cellular-only response can protect against infection. We demonstrate that nasal vaccination with targeted nanoparticles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus antigen(ClfA) protects against acute systemic S. aureus infection in the absence of any antigen-specific antibodies. These findings can help inform future developments in Staphylococcal vaccine development and studies into the requirements for protective immunity against S. aureus.


Received August 12, 2013. Revision received October 3, 2013. Accepted October 16, 2013.

? The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

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