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Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

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  • #31
    Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

    Large outbreak of Schmallenberg disease is predicted in Estonia

    According to the current evidences collected by the Information and Analytical Center of the Administration of the Veterinary Surveillance lambs with congenital defects characteristic of the Schmallenberg disease were reported in Estonia.

    The virus is known to have widely spread in the territory of the European Union as the latter did not take any efforts to control and eradicate the disease. More over, since May 2012 the virus has officially been announced endemic in Europe with the countries where the virus was reported for the first time being not obliged to report its outbreaks. Consequently, such information is no longer open to public.

    The Rosselkhoznadzor believes that some European Union countries might have not reported outbreaks of the disease, in particular, Czech Republic and Hungary. Breeding animal consignments infected with Schmallenberg virus supplied from Austria to Russia and Kazakhstan were detected within the epidemic situation monitoring testifying to the increase of the risk of the virus introduction to the CU territory due to the inaction of the European authorities.

    The Rosselkhoznadzor considers necessary to request information from the Veterinary Services of some European countries including Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia and Poland concerning the cases of Schmallenberg virus detection in these countries, measures taken in case of detection of seropositive and PCR-positive animals, as well as animal movement control in the countries and regions were Schmallenberg disease was registered.

    Jan 25, 2013

    http://www.fsvps.ru/fsvps/news/5924.html?_language=en
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

      Originally posted by Gert van der Hoek View Post
      Comment: no details available at the moment. However it seems to me cattle with antibodies could have protection against a possible SBV infection?

      430 cows infected with Schmallenberg virus culled in Northern Kazakhstan

      BULLETIN RELEASED: 18/02/13 8:54AM GMT

      INTERFAX-KAZAKHSTAN – Schmallenberg virus, a new emerging livestock disease, has been detected in imported livestock from Austria in the North-Kazakhstan region, said the Ministry of …

      Veterinary services continue culling efforts in Akkain district (North Kazakhstan region) to stop the Schmallenberg virus. “Yesterday, the national animal decease contro…

      INTERFAX

      The report is behind a paywall. More to follow later.

      To begin destroying Austrian cows

      Published on 18/02/2013

      Recall that the decision was made by the government of Kazakhstan. Animals found dangerous virus Schmallenberg. At the moment, already emptied the farm sector "Leon."

      On the eve of visit there ambulance brigade. Lethal injection introduced around livestock, along with offspring. Now epidotryad continues in LLP "Poltava". Animal carcasses parties are taken to a specially trained animal burial and burning.



      Nygmat ZHAKUPBAEV, chairman of the veterinary control and supervision of the Ministry of Agriculture:

      - For killing the animal, the drug that works instantly. You can not say that today everything is destroyed and all is well, because the virus has the ability to spread.

      Link to news report

      Link leads to video, showing the culling of cattle

      Snip from another report stating the culling has started today (february 18, 2013), the Kazakhstan government will reimburse the farmers and pay for the culling.

      machinetranslation

      Recall that in northern Kazakhstan in two farm "Leon" and "Poltava", work is continuing to destroy the patient Austrian cattle. In TOO "Leon" all livestock is culled and burned and this 290 adult cows Simmental and 115 calves. In Company "Poltava" work epidotryada only started today, February 18. There euthanized 200 calves and 50 cows.

      http://news.mail.ru/inworld/kazakhst...mics/12033264/
      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

        United Kingdom

        Lambing season left blighted as deadly Schmallenberg virus

        Farmers fear livestock crisis after thousands of animals killed by Schmallenberg disease

        CHARLIE COOPER MONDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2013

        Tens of thousands of lambs have been stillborn or deformed throughout Britain as a result of the deadly Schmallenberg virus, with the industry bracing itself for what could be a blighted lambing season.

        In infected flocks the rate of lamb loss has been between 25 and 30 per cent on average, according to the National Farmers Union livestock chief, who has lost 40 per cent of the lambs from his early breeding flock to the emerging virus. Schmallenberg has been reported on more than 1,200 farms across the country, but there are fears the disease is being under-reported and that the Government is not taking the threat seriously enough.

        More: The Independent
        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

          Source: http://www.smallholder.co.uk/news/10...mammals_in_UK/

          Schmallenberg virus now spread to wild mammals in UK
          12:33pm Wednesday 20th February 2013 in News

          .... Dr Garigliany said wild animals such as roe and red deer can potentially act as a reservoir of infection.

          "We should implement specific surveillance of wild animals for SBV," he told BBC News...

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

            SBV in wild animals is not new; it was confirmed in Germany in deer, roedeer and a bison last year. Akabane virus has also been found in horses, donkeys, buffalo, deer and camels. It is not expected the health of deer or horses or other animals (pigs?) will be affected by a SBV infection.

            20 February 2013

            Farm virus 'can infect wild animals'

            By Helen Briggs

            BBC News


            A livestock virus sweeping through British sheep flocks and cattle herds has infected wild deer, say scientists.

            The disease, which is spread by insects, causes birth defects in lambs and can reduce milk yields in cattle.

            Outbreaks have been reported in farm animals in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Spain and the UK.

            European scientists say wild deer can catch the virus, and are calling for the impact on wildlife to be monitored.

            Dr Garigliany said wild animals such as roe and red deer can potentially act as a reservoir of infection.

            "We should implement specific surveillance of wild animals for SBV," he told BBC News.

            He said wild boar as well as wild deer show signs of SBV infection, although it is not thought to make them sick.
            “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
            Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

            ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

              machinetranslation

              20 February 2013

              Kazakhstan has threatened to sue Austria for supplying infected cows

              Kazakh authorities intend to sue the veterinary authorities of Austria, through whose fault the country got the animals infected with the virus Schmallenberg. On this, as the Tengrinews.kz, Minister of Agriculture of the Republic Asylzhan Mamytbekov.

              "If the Austrian party voluntarily repay the damage, we will sue them. As in any business disputes where damages awarded, it is not only the principal amount of the damage and loss of revenue and the costs incurred in the course content, it all may be the subject of the claim, "- said the official, adding that the complaint will be lodged in one of Kazakhstan courts.

              Elite breeds of cows were imported from Austria in the economy "Leon" and "Poltava" in the north of Kazakhstan in September last year. All were delivered to the country more than 700 head of cattle. How to write "Express K" on their purchase through the "KAF" was allocated 1.7 million euros (farm animals have a long-term lease).

              With the passage of mandatory in such cases, quarantine, local veterinarians have found that at least 80 head of cattle sick. Analyzes identified the foreign cows virus diarrhea, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and Schmallenberg. This diagnosis, according to the 24.kz, later confirmed by experts from Russia and the UK.
              The Government of Kazakhstan decided to destroy all cattle imported from Austria with youngsters born in the territory of the republic. In mid-February 2013 the animals were killed and their carcasses burned.

              Ministry of Agriculture of the Republic asked for clarification of the Austrian veterinarians and suppliers ( confirmed that supplies of cattle involved in a certain firm in Hungary.) However, the said it sold Kazakhstan animals were healthy.

              Schmallenberg virus was first identified in the autumn of 2011 in the German city of the same name. Disease caused by a virus, characterized by diarrhea, fever, can kill adult and young animals. He was exposed to sheep, goats and cattle. Development of a vaccine to combat the new disease, according to experts, can take up to two years. Effect of Schmallenberg virus on human health have not been studied.

              Lenta
              “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
              Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

              ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21541997


                22 February 2013 Last updated at 03:28 ET
                Viewpoint: Farm virus spreads to deer
                By Professor Jonathan Ball Virologist, University of Nottingham
                Red deer Evidence of SBV infection of wild deer could be the tip of the iceberg

                Evidence of extensive Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection of wild deer populations has far-reaching significance - not least for the future control of this devastating pathogen.

                SBV emerged in northern Europe in the summer of 2011.

                It was first observed in cattle, where its arrival was heralded by a series of relatively innocuous symptoms that included reduced milk production and diarrhoea...

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                  SVB found in more than 1500 farms all over the UK.

                  27 february 2013

                  UK - Schmallenberg virus – updated testing results

                  (Figures correct at time of publication)

                  This table includes additional serology results provided by laboratories at Liverpool University and Scotland’s Rural College. Results from Scotland have not been listed by county as they all relate to animals introduced into Scotland from English counties where Schmallenberg virus has been reported.

                  For the first time Schmallenberg virus antibodies have been detected in blood samples from goats and alpacas.

                  AHVLA

                  As at 30 January (2012!, GvdH) the virus has been detected at 50 sheep farms in France and as at 25 January there have been confirmed cases at 32 sheep farms, 1 cattle farm and 1 goat farm in the United Kingdom.

                  Dutch Government
                  “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                  Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                  ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                    Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21609335


                    28 February 2013 Last updated at 20:57 ET
                    Livestock virus found on 1,500 farms
                    By Helen Briggs BBC News

                    A virus that causes stillbirths and birth defects in lambs and calves has spread to more than 1,500 UK farms, new government figures show.

                    Cases of Schmallenberg have now been reported in all the counties of England and Wales, and in Northern Ireland.

                    Scottish farmers are on alert for the disease, which is carried by midges...

                    ...The latest figures from the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency show the virus has been detected on 1,531 farms, in cattle, sheep, alpacas and goats...

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                      Source: http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/hea...ered-1-4918414


                      Farming fears after second case of Schmallenberg discovered
                      By MICHAEL MCGLADE
                      Published on 20/03/2013 16:55

                      A SECOND case of the devastating livestock disease -Schmallenberg - has been confirmed at a farm in Co Down, according to the Ulster Farmers Union.

                      The disease that can cause foetal abnormalities and stillbirth in sheep and cattle has already wrecked havoc in many other parts of Britain and in the Republic.

                      UFU President Harry Sinclair urged farmers to remain cautious.

                      “We are disappointed that the Schmallenberg virus has made its way to Northern Ireland,” said Mr Sinclair...

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                        27 March 2013

                        Schmallenberg virus: arrival in Scotland confirmed


                        The first evidence of cases of the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) among livestock bred and raised in Scotland has been confirmed.

                        Eight cows on the Barony Campus of Scotland's Rural College in Dumfries and Galloway have tested positive for SBV antibodies.

                        It indicates exposure to the virus at some time last year.

                        No deformed calves have yet been born to the 160-strong herd on the farm north of Dumfries.

                        Last year a ram from Shropshire was confirmed with the virus after being transported to Orkney.

                        The animals involved in the latest incident were homebred and no animals had been added to the herd from outside Scotland.

                        More: BBC-News
                        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                          Scotland: cows in Dumfries and Galloway test positive for deadly Schmallenberg virus

                          27 Mar 2013

                          Eight cows from Dumfries and Galloway have tested positive for Schmallenberg virus (SBV) antibodies, indicating exposure to the disease last year, although at a low prevalence.

                          SBV is spread by midges and cases of the virus were reported across Europe last year.

                          A small number of animals which were recently moved into Scotland tested positive for SBV but the eight Dumfries and Galloway animals were all homebred, providing the first evidence to suggest exposure to infected midges in Scotland.

                          The eight cows are part of a 160-strong dairy herd at Barony campus of Scotland's Rural College. No deformed calves have yet been born.

                          Rural Affairs Secretary Richard Lochhead said: "Since Schmallenberg was first detected in the south of England we have watched it spread slowly northwards. Confirmation of its arrival in Scotland is, therefore, no surprise but is nonetheless disappointing and undoubtedly a headache which farmers could do without at the moment.

                          "Following that confirmation, farmers should continue to exercise vigilance particularly when moving animals onto their farm and should consider testing breeding stock for the SBV antibody.

                          "Current evidence from surveillance carried out across Europe suggests that infection with Schmallenberg virus has a relatively low impact but we know that it can cause difficulties when cows or ewes are infected in the early stages of pregnancy."

                          More : Daily Record
                          “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                          Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                          ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                            Machinetranslated - From Finland

                            04.10.2013

                            A new viral disease of cattle caused malformations


                            Anneli Kallioniemi Send feedback to the supplier

                            The all-new ruminants Schmallenberg virus disease has spread to a large part of Finland.

                            About ten sheep farms or in the barn this spring found born deformed lambs or calves, with the development of a new virus is disrupted.

                            - Virus-or antibody findings are plenty of Kokkola-Kitee, south of a line, but the malformations are tip of the iceberg, says senior researcher Ulla Rikula Food Safety Authority Evira.

                            The disease should be suspected if the calves, lambs or kilejä are stillborn or deformed, or in cattle occurs in abortions. The virus interferes with the central nervous system, as well as the development of the limbs and spine, resulting in a severely deformed animal.

                            Schmallenberg virus is a whole new sheep and cattle plague in Europe. It was discovered in Germany in the autumn of 2011, and has been followed by a number of European countries.

                            Finland antibodies against the virus was found in herds for the first time last August in the south-west.

                            Damaged by a virus or calves, lambs mothers are infected last year in the late summer or early fall. The virus spread midges.

                            Infected mothers may have been asymptomatic. Specific tiineysaikaan Infection may be fatal to the offspring.

                            - When a lamb or calf born in the spring, it may have defects. We estimate that the Schmallenberg due to deformed calves may be born until the end of May.

                            Evira is going to campaign for birth defects and abortion causes. The study is a cattle owner free of charge until the end of May.

                            Blood dams is no longer found in the virus, but the memory of the blood remains antibodies. Researchers believe that the antibodies protect animals up to a lifetime of the same virus for subsequent attacks.

                            Schmallenberg distribution evolves, the dairy herds surveys are completed. The virus causes the greatest losses, where it spreads to the new area. State level, the economic losses can be large.

                            It is not yet known whether the virus will be able to spend the winter, or whether perhaps next summer in our country with the wind new midges that carry the virus.

                            Satankunnan Kansa
                            “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                            Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                            ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                              SCHMALLENBERG VIRUS - EUROPE (17): (RUSSIA) IMPORTED BOVINE, INTERNATIONAL TRADE
                              ************************************************** ******************************
                              A ProMED-mail post
                              http://www.promedmail.org

                              [1]

                              Date: Mon 8 Apr 2013
                              Source: RG.RU (Rossiiskaya Gazeta/Russian Gazette) [in Russian, machine trans., edited]
                              http://rg.ru/2013/04/08/reg-cfo/infekciya-anons.html


                              1st focus of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in the Tver region

                              ---------------------------------------------------------

                              According of orders 268 and 269 issued by the State Veterinary Inspectorate of the Tver oblast, 2 animal farms, one in the village of Kozlovo (Andreopolsky district, map at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...-Andreapol.png) and the other, a cattle breeding center, in the village of Verhanovo (Konakovsky district, map at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tv...t-Konakovo.png), have been declared as "hotspots" of SBV, a disease which affects cattle, sheep, and goats.

                              The decision was based upon the test results of cattle serum samples performed by the Federal Centre for Animal Health (State Organization "ARRIAH"). Antibodies to the virus have been identified in 29 samples. All suspect animals were imported into Tver from abroad. Now they are isolated from the main herd; their slaughter is prohibited, the premises have been disinfected.

                              [The country of origin of the suspected cattle is not mentioned in the report above. The location of Tver oblast, in western Russia, is available at http://tinyurl.com/cj5mvwu; of the Andreopolsky district (within Tver), at http://tinyurl.com/cnwsk4w, and of the Konakovsky district at http://tinyurl.com/bqo275c.

                              A HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map can be accessed at http://healthmap.org/r/1mS5.

                              The ban on the slaughter of the animals was probably based upon a decision to follow the fate/health-status of their offspring. It will be interesting to obtain information on the gestation status of the animals upon arrival (from where?) in Russia and the results of the undertaken clinical follow-up. - Mod.AS]
                              “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                              Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                              ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                                Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...l-si041513.php

                                Public release date: 17-Apr-2013

                                Contact: Richard Mellor
                                r.d.mellor@leeds.ac.uk
                                44-011-334-34031
                                University of Leeds
                                Study identifies 'chink in the armor' of Schmallenberg virus

                                A key building block in the Schmallenberg virus could be targeted by anti-viral drugs, according to a new study led from the University of Leeds.

                                The disease, which causes birth defects and stillbirths in sheep, goats and cattle, was first discovered in Germany in late 2011 and has already spread to more than 5,000 farms across Europe, and 1,500 farms in the UK alone.

                                There is currently no way of treating infected animals, but a study published in Nucleic Acids Research reports that the Schmallenberg virus nucleocapsid protein, which protects its genetic material, could be its Achilles' heel.

                                A University of Leeds-led team of virologists and structural biologists used X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to decipher the three-dimensional shape of the nucleocapsid protein and also show how it builds the inner workings of the virus itself.

                                Dr John Barr, of the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences and co-leader of the study, said: "The protein forms a chain a bit like a necklace that wraps around and protects the RNA, the genetic material of the virus. This chain also recruits other proteins that are vital to the virus' ability to multiply and cause disease. We have developed a very finely detailed picture of the shape of the protein and all the nooks and crannies that it needs to present to other molecules to be able to function."

                                The nucleocapsid proteins bind together in a ring-like structure of four identical protein units, and the ring is held together by contacts between the protein units, a bit like people holding hands in a circle.

                                Co-lead Dr Tom Edwards, also from Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences, said: "The shape of the nucleocapsid protein has shown us important details of how the individual proteins in these rings are interacting. This not only tells us how the virus works, but importantly we think we can block that interaction and disrupt the process of making the ring. That could be the chink in its armour. It would stop the protein wrapping up the RNA, and would essentially kill the virus. We are now designing small molecules that could block ring formation and could therefore be an effective antiviral drug."

                                The Schmallenberg virus appears to be spread by midges. It causes a relatively mild illness in adult animals but is responsible for stillbirths and birth defects in cattle, sheep and goats.

                                The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) believes the disease was probably brought into the UK from infected midges blown across the Channel. It has since spread rapidly, causing severe losses on many holdings across the entire UK. There is new evidence that the Schmallenberg virus can also spread to wild animal populations such as deer and wild boar, raising the possibility that a reservoir of the disease could develop outside the control of farmers and cause problems for many years to come.

                                Developing a vaccine for the Schmallenberg virus is a possibility. One already exists for the similar Akabane virus, but the discovery by the Leeds-led team is the first step toward developing a treatment that could be used after an animal is infected.

                                The research was funded by The Wellcome Trust and involved researchers from The University of Leeds, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, The University of St Andrews, The Veterinary Laboratories Agency, and the University of Liverpool. The paper, "Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization," is published in Nucleic Acids Research.

                                ###

                                Further information

                                Dr John Barr and Dr Thomas Edwards are available for interview.

                                Copies of the paper and high-resolution computer generated images of the structure of the protein and virus are available on request.

                                Contact Richard Mellor, Communications, University of Leeds

                                T: +44 (0)113 343 4031
                                E: r.d.mellor@leeds.ac.uk

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