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Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

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  • #16
    Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

    machinetranslation


    Schmallenberg virus also is prevalent in Slovenia

    Posted: 18/01/2013

    According to available data, the experts concluded that transmission of the virus from sheep to humans can not be excluded, but it is highly unlikely.


    LJUBLJANA - In Slovenia, in sheep confirmed the presence of Schmallenberg virus, reported the Veterinary Chamber. Schmallenberg Virus was first discovered in 2011 in Germany and since then the disease has spread rapidly in the northern and western Europe.

    Abortion and defective animals

    Schmallenberg virus causes the acute form of severe diarrhea, chills and drop in milk yield in cattle (50 percent). If you are infected pregnant female ruminants virus izvrgavanje pregnancies, mainly sheep and cows. Reported that in infected herds abortira to 25 percent of pregnant females. In addition to abortion are born in a significant number of defective animals that are unfit for life and fattening, the message noted in the staff room. Infected herds may suffer significant economic harm.

    Human transmission is not excluded, but is unlikely

    According to available information, the experts concluded that transmission of the virus to humans can not be excluded, but it is highly unlikely.

    Scmallenberg virus is a new virus belonging to the family Orthobunyaviridae and is related to Akabane virus. Akabane virus is spread mainly in ruminants in Japan, Australia and Africa. Like the related viruses are also transmitted by the insects. Given the prevalence of insects and almost impossible to combat remains the only option preventive vaccination. In some EU Member States have already introduced a systematic control of the disease, in explaining the Veterinary Association.

    Slovenske Novice

    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

      Reading the abstract, the report suggests import of SBV from France into Poland. Infected bulls could have spread the virus and local midges could have picked up the virus for further spread?


      First report of Schmallenberg Virus Infection in Cattle and Midges in Poland

      M. Larska1,*, M. P. Polak1, M. Grochowska2, L. Lechowski2, J. S. Związek3, J. F. Żmudziński1

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013

      DOI: 10.1111/tbed.12057

      Summary

      Two outbreaks of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection that coincided with the introduction of two bulls imported from France into two herds located in West Pomerania and Silesia provinces in Poland are described in detail. The first SBV real-time RT-PCR-positive result was obtained during routine testing of one of the imported bulls. The second bull and the affected farms were tracked by further investigation.

      Transmission of SBV into Polish cattle herds where the bulls were imported was confirmed by viral RNA detection in real-time RT-PCR, virus isolation followed by immunoperoxidase (IPX) staining and seroconversion.

      SBV RNA was detected also in Culicoides obsoletus pools caught in a trap located 5 km from one of the outbreaks. Testing nearly 900 samples collected prior to the two outbreaks from the same areas or provinces neighbouring with Germany where SBV cases had previously been detected gave negative results for the presence of SBV or specific antibodies.

      These cases are the first ones detected in cattle in Poland and provide evidence of recent transmission of the pathogen into the country and involvement of midge vectors.


      -----------------------------------------------------

      Transbound Emerg Dis. 2013 Feb;60(1):1-3. doi: 10.1111/tbed.12039. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

      Schmallenberg virus antibodies detected in poland.
      Kaba J, Czopowicz M, Witkowski L.
      Source
      Unit of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.

      Abstract

      Between 24 and 30 July 2012 230 adult goats from three western provinces of Poland bordering on Germany (Western Pomerania, Lubuskie and Lower Silesia) were blood-sampled and tested for antibodies to Schmallenberg virus (SBV) using indirect immunoenzymatic test (ID Screen® Schmallenberg virus indirect, IDvet Innovative Diagnostics).

      The ELISA test identified 21 seropositive goats - 15 in Western Pomerania (16% of all goats tested in this province), five in Lubuskie (6%) and one in Lower Silesia (2%). Our study demonstrates for the first time the presence of antibodies to SBV in Poland.

      Pubmed
      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

        Germany: current information on Schmallenberg virus

        last updated January 29, 2013

        As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

        In Germany animals from 2110 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus (SBV) so far.

        The cases occurred in 1124 cattle holdings, 937 sheep holdings and 49 goat holdings
        .

        Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (274 cattle, 272 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (227 cattle, 143 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (124 cattle, 140 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (112 cattle, 110 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 50 cattle, 39 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (47 cattle, 37 sheep, 7 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 21 sheep holdings), Thuringia (30 cattle, 47 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (19 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (3 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (187 cattle, 41 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (11 cattle holdings, 42 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (14 cattle, 11 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep holdings, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).

        FLI

        Link to map
        Map: Distribution of 'Schmallenberg virus' since January 1, 2013, in Germany, updated January 29, 2013
        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

          “Grim return” of Schmallenberg virus in U.K.

          Geni Wren, Bovine Veterinarian Magazine | Updated: 01/28/2013


          Schmallenberg virus has been associated with brief mild/moderate disease (milk drop, pyrexia, diarrhea) in adult cattle and deformities and neurological defects in unborn lambs and calves, has made a “grim return” in 2013, according to researchers at The University of Nottingham Veterinary School.

          The university says data indicates that this year losses could be as high as 30% on some severely affected sheep operations. Identified in the U.K. in 2011, by the end of 2012 Schmallenberg has been found in most counties in England and Wales, and is widely distributed in northern and western Europe.
          University of Nottingham veterinary surgeon Rachael Tarlinton says it will generally cause mild or no disease in adult animals but if the animal is pregnant the virus replicates in the nerve cells of the fetus and, depending at what stage they have reached in the pregnancy, this leads to abortion, abnormalities of the skeleton and neurological defects.

          Almost a year ago a Bovine Veterinarian article said that Defra, the U.K. government department responsible for policy and regulations on the environment, food and rural affairs, indicated that evidence suggests that Schmallenberg virus was brought into the U.K. from infected biting midges blown across the Channel. The disease has not been shown to be transmissible to humans and has not been identified in the U.S.

          Risk to cattle
          Though the effects of Schmallenberg have mainly been seen in sheep and goats, cattle are susceptible to the virus.

          A January report by DEFRA indicates that 752 cattle have tested positive for Schmallenberg virus, and 59 calves have presented with fetal malformations.
          A report in ProMed, a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, says based on trail data using bull semen containing Schmallenberg virus (SBV) inoculated into calves, it has to be concluded that samples with a medium as well as with a low viral genome load (Cq values over 30) can be potentially infectious for bovines. The report said that these results confirm the requirement for a sensitive viral RNA-extraction as well as SBV-genome detection system for testing of semen from SBV-infected bulls.

          Risk to U.S.
          In an early 2012 statement, USDA Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford, DVM, said: “USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is taking action to mitigate the entry of Schmallenberg virus, a pathogen that has been reported from a number of European Union countries since late 2011 but is not known to exist in the United States.”

          Also in 2012 the USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Services Veterinary Services placed additional restrictions on shipments of ruminant semen and embryos (germplasm) originating from the European Union (EU), and from countries that are not formally part of the EU but which follow EU legislation. These restrictions became effective February 21, 2012. Read more here.

          Bovinevetonline
          “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
          Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

          ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

            Ireland: rise in number of Schmallenberg virus reports in Co Wexford

            05-01-2013

            There has been a significant increase in the number of suspected cases of Schmallenberg virus reported in Co Wexford in the last week. The frequency of reports has intensified and coincides with the start of lambing in early lambing flocks. Flockowners, vets and scanners report individual or multiple cases, within a flock, of ewes giving birth to lambs with congenital deformities. There are also reports of suspected cases of the virus in newborn calves.

            While there has been a significant increase in suspected cases reported among flockowners, the Department's of Agriculture's Regional Veterinary Laboratories have not witnessed a sharp rise in lambs or calves presented for post mortem examination. Over the past two weeks four separate submissions of aborted/stillborn ovine foetuses were received at Kilkenny Regional Veterinary Laboratory (from four different flocks in the South East) in which Schmallenberg virus infection is suspected because of congenital abnormality in the foetuses.

            Schmallenberg virus infection has been confirmed in only one of these submissions; confirmatory test results are awaited on the other three cases.

            Based on this information, it is too early to say how widespread a problem this is likely to be in early lambing flocks in 2013 but it is reasonable to make flock owners aware of the potential problem of dystocia.

            DAFM is finalising a structured nationwide survey of cattle herds and sheep flocks to try and establish with a reasonable degree of confidence the extent of virus infection in the national herd/flock at the end of the 2012 vector season. The results of this survey should be available for communication to the farming community and veterinary practitioners within the next two weeks.

            The first case of the virus was confirmed in a bovine foetus submitted for post mortem examination from a farm in Co Cork on Tuesday, 30 October. It was feared at the time that the virus could be widespread but there is still no real way of gauging the actual potential severity of the risk (confirmed in 11 herds in late November).

            Confirmed cases to date remain small, but, with many mid-season lambing flocks or spring calving herds still a considerable distance from lambing and calving, the virus could be contained in other herds and flocks in the area or further afield. The hope against this happening is the mechanisms by which the virus spreads.

            Potential risk

            The virus is spread from animal to animal by biting midges. Cattle, sheep and goats are all susceptible to the disease. The high risk period for spreading the disease is during the vector season (midges active) which is normally April to November in Ireland. The most susceptible time for infected animals to pass the virus through to a foetus is during month three and four in cattle and during month two in sheep. However, the risk will be influenced by midge activity in the area which is also largely influenced by climatic conditions.

            For example, mid-season lambing ewes farmed in milder areas such as the south east, east and south may be more at risk than those farmed along the western coast where temperatures may have been cooler.

            It can also be influenced by the landscape where animals are grazing with increased midge activity generally seen in sheltered areas. Taking these factors into account and the milder weather in the latter half of the year, it remains hard to predict exactly how widespread the risk could be.

            The virus also cannot be spread in the absence of biting midges and it is therefore likely that there will only be a percentage of the total animals infected in a flock or herd.

            The disease has been rampant in countries across mainland Europe since 2011 and reports suggest that the prevalence within a flock or herd is averaging between 15% and 20% but this can fluctuate, depending on midge activity and the level of infection in an area.

            More: Farmers Journal
            “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
            Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

            ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

              Jan 17 2013

              Evidence that exposure to Schmallenberg virus has been quite widespread in Southern and South-eastern counties of Ireland during 2012

              Schmallenberg virus (SBV) was first identified in Germany in late 2011. The virus, which is
              transmitted by biting midges is capable of causing disease in infected cattle and sheep, primarily
              leading to the birth of malformed calves and lambs. Since its discovery, evidence of infection of
              livestock with this virus has been found across Northern Europe with first reports of the virus
              reaching South East England in January 2012. Given the likelihood that this vector-borne virus would
              eventually reach our shores, DAFM began targeted surveillance in January 2012 and all deformed
              calves and lambs presented for examination to Department Regional Veterinary Laboratories (RVLs)
              since then have been tested for the presence of the virus. The first positive case was detected in a
              cattle herd in County Cork in late October 2012. To date the infection has been confirmed in
              foetuses obtained from a further 20 cattle herds and 12 sheep flocks (33 herds/flocks in total). All of
              these confirmed cases have been confined to Co. Cork (16 cases) and South Eastern counties (8 in
              Wexford, 7 in Kilkenny, 1 in Wicklow and 1 in Waterford) as illustrated in the map in Annex 1 below.

              More, incl. maps: DAFM - Ireland
              “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
              Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

              ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                jan 30 2013

                The number of farms infected with the Schmallenberg virus has doubled in the past fortnight to 54.

                The escalation in outbreaks is mainly happening in dairy and beef herds as the calving season gets underway.

                Cork-based vet Bill Cashman said he had confirmed eight outbreaks in dairy herds.

                An Animal Health Ireland (AHI) meeting due to be held at Clonakilty Agricultural College last week was relocated to the Shinagh trial farm when a series of abortions in the college's dairy herd triggered suspicions of a Schmallenberg outbreak.

                Kildalton College in Kilkenny also lost more than 12pc of their early lambs to the disease, according to farm manager, John Walsh.

                IFA National Sheep Committee chairman James Murphy has also had firsthand experience of the virus, with approximately 5pc of his flock showing signs of infection.

                "The losses were a little higher than normal, but if that's the extent of the impact of the disease then I can live with that," he said.

                Mr Murphy said the worst affected farmers believed they would lose half of their lamb crop.

                "Farms in sheltered areas along rivers are much more prone to the disease," he said.

                While British authorities have claimed that just 6pc of flocks suffered outbreaks, Mr Cashman said that this number only accounted for flocks with more than 25pc of ewes exhibiting signs of the disease.

                "There is also evidence that the eggs laid by infected midges will also carry the disease, so the next generation of midges will also pose a threat," added Mr Cashman.

                IMMUNITY

                Mr Murphy added he was tempted to hold on to younger ewes in the hope that they would have immunity next year.

                However, there is a lot of uncertainty among farmers as to the best approach, with some reports of British flocks being re-infected by the disease for a second time this year.

                "We really need guidance from the Department (of Agriculture) on this issue now," said Mr Murphy.

                Cork is the worst affected county with 21 cases so far, 80pc of which were in cattle herds.

                Kilkenny and Wexford have 11 and 10 cases respectively. Together, these three counties account for over three quarters of all Schmallenberg outbreaks.

                Carlow, Dublin, Tipperary, Waterford and Wicklow have also confirmed outbreaks.

                - Darragh McCullough

                Independent IE
                “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                  machinetranslation

                  jan 9 2013

                  Czech Republic: malformed lambs infected with Schmallenberg virus

                  The result of passive monitoring in 2012 in the Czech Republic, 9 suspected infection Schmallenberg virus.

                  In cattle were raised on the basis of three suspected decrease performance and febrile illness. All three suspects have been infected by a virus Schmallenberg excluded.

                  Sheep said it suspects a total of 6 on the basis of a few viable or stillborn born lambs, which have been observed in a variety of malformations. The four suspects were infected Schmallenberg virus confirmed.

                  All 4 positive cases were confirmed in the second half of December 2012 (one in the Karlovy Vary region, one in the Shire Highlands and two in South Bohemia).

                  Clinically demonstrated a disease caused by a virus Schmallenberg culminates in the period from August to September (cattle). At present in the affected states disappeared virus in cattle, but there was an increased incidence of malformations in lambs. This situation is probably related to intrauterine exposure in previous months.

                  State Veterinary Administration decided in 2013 printed on the active monitoring of all bulls at semen collection centers throughout the Czech Republic. Regional Veterinary Administration ensure sampling (anticoagulated blood or serum) from all bulls who are its location in the collection centers. The blood sample then sent for examination to the State Veterinary Institute in Prague, Jihlava and Olomouc. Laboratory method for the serological examination . In the case of serologically positive outcome seam confirmatory virological examination .

                  Regional Veterinary Administration ensure continuous testing of all breeding bulls will be semen to its location in the whole of 2013.

                  More: SVSCR (National Veterinary Institute)

                  Link to map

                  .
                  “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                  Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                  ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                    Fertility problems caused by Schmallenberg infection are a wellknown phenomenon. Until now this did not get as much attention as the malformed offspring of cattle, sheep and goats. International serological evidence indicates the majority of adult animals in affected regions is positive for SBV.

                    Adult animals hit hard by Schmallenberg infection

                    Olivia Cooper

                    Thursday 31 January 2013

                    Schmallenberg virus could be affecting adult animals far worse than previously thought, farmers and farm vets have warned.

                    The virus had been thought to cause only brief, mild or moderate symptoms in adult cattle, with much worse life-threatening effects in unborn cattle, sheep and goats.

                    But Tim Bebbington, from Castle Vets in Launceston, said the impact of the disease was not restricted to abortions and deformed foetuses.

                    "Every now and again several cows seem to go down quickly, with decreased milk production, scouring, low productivity and poor fertility. There's no evidence of anything else wrong except Schmallenberg."

                    He urged caution, however, as it was possible that other problems were being incorrectly attributed to Schmallenberg virus.

                    His practice had recently tested 360 animals from 60 beef and dairy farms across Devon and Cornwall - and only 15 tested negative for the disease.


                    Mr Bebbington has also received many reports of Schmallenberg in early lambing flocks, but the true picture could be far worse as the disease was still non-notifiable, he added.

                    Symptoms were also varied, including ewes carrying vast amounts of fluid with dead lambs. "It's looking much worse than last year, but many farmers aren't reporting it because there's nothing they can do about it - it's not a notifiable disease."

                    The number of beef and dairy cows scanning barren had doubled since last year, to 18%, said Mr Bebbington, who admitted feeling "very nervous about the spring calving herds".

                    A vaccine to protect animals against Schmallenberg virus could not come soon enough, he added.

                    David Horton milks 180 dairy cows at Dunsburgh Farm near Plymouth, and last year lost 15 heifers through unexplained illness.

                    "They just got weaker and weaker. There wasn't a test for Schmallenberg then, but the heifers that survived tested positive this year and haven't done at all well. Their calves appear brain dead and so far six have died.

                    "Nigel Gibbens, the chief veterinary officer, is still talking about this as a low impact disease but I disagree - it's a catastrophe waiting to happen."

                    At a meeting in Devon last week, DEFRA secretary Owen Paterson admitted he hadn't heard about the effects on adult cattle.

                    But Peter Clarke, co-ordinator for the Farm Crisis Network in Cornwall, said some farmers' milk yields had dropped by 50%, while other beef farmers had lost more than half their calves.

                    "This is having a devastating effect on sheep, beef and dairy farms. We have a perfect storm in the South West, with poor weather, poor crops, TB and now Schmallenberg. I don't know how much more farmers can take - it's very worrying."

                    Farmers Weekly
                    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                      UK: Lamb losses ‘can be cut’


                      Tuesday, January 29, 2013


                      MANY sheep producers could cut neonatal lamb losses significantly with well-organised lambing routines and better colostrum management, according to a husbandry specialist.

                      Nia Williams, technical manager with lamb nutrition and sheep husbandry specialist Nettex says with falling lamb prices and potential Schmallenberg virus implications piling even more pressure on beleaguered flockmasters, attention to detail in these crucial areas will be more important than ever this lambing season.

                      Newborn lambs have limited energy reserves and need rapid access to quality colostrum to survive and thrive, she explained.

                      “Producers face a battle over the next few weeks and can ill afford to lose any healthy born lambs to the usual causes of lamb deaths in the UK,” she said.

                      According to research, nearly half of all lamb losses occur during the first 48 hours of life, but many of these could be avoided Nettex maintains.

                      Read more: EADT24
                      “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                      Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                      ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                        Germany: current information on Schmallenberg virus

                        last updated February 5, 2013

                        As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

                        In Germany animals from 2129 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus (SBV) so far.

                        The cases occurred in 1135 cattle holdings, 945 sheep holdings and 49 goat holdings.

                        Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (275 cattle, 272 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (227 cattle, 144 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (124 cattle, 140 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (112 cattle, 110 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 50 cattle, 39 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (47 cattle, 37 sheep, 7 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 22 sheep holdings), Thuringia (30 cattle, 51 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (19 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (3 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (197 cattle, 41 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (11 cattle holdings, 43 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (14 cattle, 12 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep holdings, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).

                        FLI

                        Map: Distribution of Schmallenberg virus since January 1, 2013, in Germany, updated February 5, 2013
                        “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                        Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                        ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                          feb 8 2013

                          Schmallenberg virus cases increase in Welsh lambs

                          A virus that leads to birth defects in lambs is being increasingly detected in Wales, say farmers and vets.

                          The Schmallenberg virus is carried by insects and was first detected in Germany 18 months ago.

                          But some farmers in lowland areas of south Wales say it is now clear the disease has reached Wales.

                          UK government officials believe there are now more than 1,200 cases of the infection in Wales and England, but they say it poses no human threat.

                          However, it is a growing concern for Welsh sheep farmers who are becoming increasingly worried about the disease's impact on flocks.


                          Colin Evans, who farms at Pant y Goitre farm in the Usk Valley in Monmouthshire, said between 20 and 25 lambs born to his 800 ewes appeared to have been affected by Schmallenberg - up to 5% of the flock.

                          "There are very few [farmers] that I speak to who haven't had a case, so we understand it now and are quite concerned by it because unless we find a control for this through a vaccine, we are concerned that our 3% to 5% loss might become 20% by next year," Mr Evans said.

                          BBC News
                          “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                          Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                          ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                            machinetranslation

                            feb 9 2013

                            Schmallenberg virus in Swedish calves

                            MALMO Two calves, one in Skåne and Uppland, are carriers of schmallenbergvirus. It is the first time the virus was found in calves in Sweden, reports the agricultural magazine ATL online.

                            Schmallenbergvirus (SBV) is spread by midges and has for the past year been widely adopted across the country. It infects cloven-hoofed animals, including sheep and goats, and can induce females to throw their fetuses or birth defects in their offspring.

                            Kuriren
                            “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                            Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                            ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                              Germany: current Information on Schmallenberg virus

                              last updated February 12, 2013

                              As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

                              In Germany animals from 2146 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus (SBV) so far.

                              The cases occurred in 1147 cattle holdings, 950 sheep holdings and 49 goat holdings.


                              Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (275 cattle, 272 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (229 cattle, 144 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (124 cattle, 141 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (112 cattle, 110 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 50 cattle, 39 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (50 cattle, 37 sheep, 7 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 22 sheep holdings), Thuringia (31 cattle, 52 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (19 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (3 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (202 cattle, 42 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (11 cattle holdings, 44 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (15 cattle, 13 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep holdings, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).
                              So far infections with Schmallenberg Virus have been detected in Germany,the Netherlands, Belgium, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Denmark , Estonia, Switzerland, Ireland, Northern Ireland , Norway, Sweden, Finland, Poland, Austria and Switzerland. According to unconfirmed reports there could be infection in further european countries.

                              FLI

                              Map: Distribution of 'Schmallenberg virus' since January 1, 2013, in Germany, updated February 12, 2013
                              “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                              Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                              ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Schmallenberg Virus - News and updates - 2013

                                Comment: no details available at the moment. However it seems to me cattle with antibodies could have protection against a possible SBV infection?

                                430 cows infected with Schmallenberg virus culled in Northern Kazakhstan

                                BULLETIN RELEASED: 18/02/13 8:54AM GMT

                                INTERFAX-KAZAKHSTAN – Schmallenberg virus, a new emerging livestock disease, has been detected in imported livestock from Austria in the North-Kazakhstan region, said the Ministry of …

                                Veterinary services continue culling efforts in Akkain district (North Kazakhstan region) to stop the Schmallenberg virus. “Yesterday, the national animal decease contro…

                                INTERFAX

                                The report is behind a paywall. More to follow later.
                                “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
                                Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                                ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

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