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Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe - 2011/2012

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    France, update - 31 new holdings confirmed

    In september France restarted SBV surveillance.

    Until november 27 38 holdings were suspected, 31 holdings with malformed offspring were confirmed: sheep (24), goats (3), cattle (6).

    These new confirmed farms are scattered all over France: map via this link.


    SBV congénital : Situation épidémiologique

    Traitement 1 du 27 novembre 2012

    La reprise de la circulation virale est établie sur notre territoire depuis mai 2012 et on note
    l’apparition de foyers de SBV congénital chez des ovins dans plusieurs départements depuis
    début septembre 2012.

    Depuis le 1er septembre 2012, ce sont au total 38 suspicions qui ont été enregistrées
    (24 élevages ovins, 5 élevages caprins, et 9 élevages bovins).

    31 élevages ont été confirmés atteints par des formes congénitales de SBV, répartis dans
    17 départements : 03, 04, 08, 10, 18, 31, 34, 38, 42, 44, 65, 69, 74, 76, 81, 84 et 86.

    Sont concernés : 22 élevages ovins, 3 élevages caprins et 6 élevages bovins.

    survepi

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    machinetranslation

    Pressrelease Norwegian Veterinary Institute

    Schmallenbergvirus widespread along the coast of southern Norway

    Published: 11/27/2012

    Examination of milk samples for Scmallenbervirus shows that many herds in southern Norway have been infected by the virus.

    Fisheries and Veterinary Institute has conducted a survey of bulk milk samples for antibodies against Schmallenbergvirus from herds in southern Norway. By ca. 2400 herds that have been examined have more than 400 herds antibodies against the virus, most infected situated along the coast and rivers. There are large regional differences regarding the proportion of positive herds, with more than 50% positive in the counties of Østfold, Vestfold, Aust-Agder, while it is less than 2% positive herds in Rogaland.

    Schmallenbergvirus transmitted by biting midges and can infect cattle, sheep, goats and wild ruminants and cause serious birth defects when infection in the first half of gestation. Surveys in Europe in 2011 and 2012 has proven Schmallenbergvirus approx. 4% bovine herd and about 7% of sheep farms.

    FSA monitors the situation and follow up with further studies in 2013.



    More: Norwegian Veterinary Institute

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Pressrelease National Veterinary Institute SVA - Sweden

    machinetranslation

    november 27, 2012

    New virus in sheep and cattle in Sweden

    For the first time, the proliferation of Schmallenbergvirus confirmed in Sweden and studies show that the infection is widespread in the country.

    Viruses have also been demonstrated in the midges that spread the disease. Infection with the virus can lead to malformed fetuses in sheep, goats and cattle. The infection will not lead to any restrictions imposed by the Board of Agriculture and the keepers will be able to move their animals as usual.

    In late 2011 found a new virus in ruminants in Germany, Holland and Belgium. In 2012 it spread to many more countries in Europe. The virus is named after the place where it was first discovered, Schmallenberg. The virus does not spread to humans and it is not dangerous to drink milk or eat meat from animals that have had the infection. Agriculture and the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) has conducted a national survey of cow's milk from many farms investigated because antibodies to the virus is excreted in the milk . A large proportion of the samples indicates that there are antibodies. SVA also demonstrated virus in samples from three midges, the insect that spreads the disease. - In view of the reports of contamination levels we have received from the neighboring countries in recent times, the results are not unexpected. Since the infection is spread by midges, no contamination during the winter, says Erika Chenais, epidemiologist at SVA.

    The pregnancy of ruminants affected by the virus

    The virus has affected pregnancy in ruminants in Sweden suspected of including in a sheep herd in south-eastern Sweden. Several of the animals that did not become pregnant also had antibodies to the virus. This implies a relationship but is no definitive evidence that virus infection has caused the symptoms, which may also have other causes. Earlier this year found evidence of infection in Sweden last autumn, but it is not until now has anyone seen a proliferation and possible links between the infection and the symptoms of ruminants in the country. A major outbreak involving cattle and sheep in early pregnancy can cause serious production losses.

    SVA

    Link to map

    .

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    More reports coming in from Sardinia, Italia.

    machinetranslation

    In Ozieri the third suspected case of Sassari in Schmallenberg

    23/11/2012

    SASSARI. rises to three cases of suspected disease of Schmallenberg in the area of jurisdiction of the ASL of Sassari.

    The third case of infection was reported today to Ozieri, in Location "salatu." In a herd consists of 534 sheep were reported 13 suspected abortions.

    In the meantime, expect confirmatory analysis by IZS of Teramo, for infections reported last night in two other farms of Sassari .

    The company surveyed in the town of Morecambe is located in loc. "Sa Cunzessione", where present of 295 sheep, 28 leaders have experienced symptoms while 15 lambs died with birth defects.

    Holding of Sassari, located in loc. "Baratz," of 392 leaders present, four sheep showed symptoms, 10 lambs were killed with birth defects.

    's Crisis Unit met last night in Sassari, Department of Prevention has taken steps to assign tasks and define tasks: survey of companies, delimitation of 4 km surveillance area around the suspected case, identification of the animal movement.

    Areas of surveillance rise, therefore, three with 156 companies involved, 3,649 cattle, 37,933 sheep and 203 goats in the range of 4 km delimited.

    Read more: Sassari Notizie

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    SBV all over France

    Emerging Infectious Disease Journal

    Acute Schmallenberg Virus Infections, France, 2012

    To the Editor: After unexpected emergence of bluetongue virus serotype 8 in northern Europe in 2006 (1), another arbovirus, Schmallenberg virus (SBV), which is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges, emerged in Europe in 2011 and caused disease outbreaks among ruminants (2). Nonspecific clinical signs such as fever, decreased milk production, and diarrhea were associated with acute infection in cattle, and late abortions and birth defects in newborns were associated with infection of pregnant cows, ewes, and goats (2,3).

    SBV, which belongs to the family Bunyaviridae and genus Orthobunyavirus, was detected in Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium in 2011. This virus was later detected in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Denmark, and Switzerland (4). As of August 1, 2012, a total of 5,701 infected farms were reported in Europe (2,498 sheep farms, 3,124 cattle farms, and 79 goats farms) (www.survepi.org/cerepi/). France has been the country most affected: it had 2,650 SBV-infected farms (5), (i.e., in which >1 malformed offspring was positive for SBV by real-time reverse transcription PCR [RT-PCR] on 1,128 sheep farms, 1,505 cattle farms, and 17 goat farms).
    Abnormalities detected in offspring in 2011 and in early 2012 were caused by infections acquired in 2011 (4). At that time, it was unclear whether SBV could survive the 2011–2012 winter and remain a threat to Europe. We report data suggesting that SBV overwintered or was reintroduced in France.
    Figure

    On May 16, 2012, a herd of 75 dairy cows in southwestern France (Pyrénées-Atlantiques) had hyperthermia and decreased milk production. Of 18 cows tested by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire (Maisons-Alfort, France), 9 were positive for SBV by PCR (6) (cycle threshold [Ct] range 17–36.5) and negative for SBV by ELISA (IDVet, Montpellier, France), 1 was positive by PCR and ELISA, and 8 were negative by PCR and ELISA (Figure).

    On May 23, a week after the first samples were collected, all cows tested were positive by ELISA and only 1/18 cows were positive by RT-PCR. On June 29, all 18 cows tested were negative by RT-PCR. Detection of SBV-neutralizing antibodies by virus neutralization assay in serum samples obtained on May 23 confirmed SBV ELISA results and showed that a commercial IgG ELISA is suitable for detection of acute cases of SBV.

    Viremia, as measured by RT-PCR, occurs during the first 5 days after acute infection (2). Antibody response against SBV, as measured by ELISA, is detected during or after the first 10 days after experimental infection (C. Sailleau et al., unpub. data). Accordingly, serologic and molecular data showed that acute SBV infection occurred in cattle in southwestern France in May 2012, suggesting that SBV overwintered or was reintroduced.

    Moreover, in July 2012, another case of acute SBV infection was identified in Finistère (Brittany). A cow with hyperthermia and diarrhea was SBV positive by RT-PCR (Ct 31) and negative by ELISA, which indicated a recent SBV infection.

    Three blood samples (each 170 µL) from RT-PCR–positive cows (Ct range 15–21) (1 from the Finistère and 2 from Pyrénées-Atlantiques) were injected into 3 adult IFNAR−/− mice. Seventy microliters of each sample was injected intraperitoneally and 100 μL was injected into the neck scruff of the same mice. After 4 days, the mice showed no clinical signs and their weights were unchanged. Blood samples were collected and tested for SBV by RT-PCR. All mice were positive for SBV RNA (Ct range 15–21). These data showed that blood samples from cows contained virus RNA and confirmed that SBV reemerged in 2012.

    On July 25, 2012, SBV infection was identified in a cow in Jura Canton in the northwestern, French-speaking region of Switzerland (Romandie) (7). A serologic study conducted in the United Kingdom showed that several cattle and sheep seroconverted for SBV in 2012 (8). However, our data show that SBV survived the winter, when midge numbers decreased. The precise mechanisms of SBV overwintering are not known and need to be explored.

    The consequences of SBV recirculation should be investigated, particularly in pregnant cows, ewes, and goats. The 2 SBV-positive farms described in this report are located in a previously SBV-free area (Finistère-Brittany) or an area in which the infection rate was low (Pyrénées-Atlantiques) in the winter of 2011–2012, during which seroprevalence for most herds was probably weak (C. Sailleau et al., unpub. data). Therefore, reemergence of cases of congenital forms of SBV infection in France and others areas of Europe can be expected.

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Untill today SBV was reported from northern Italy, Veneto region. Now the the first cases from Sardinia: malformed lambs were found which tested postive.

    machinetranslation

    A Tertenia case of Schmallenberg virus alarm for livestock

    November 22, 2012

    Found in the island's new pathogen that affects ruminants discovered in 2011 in Germany. The confirmation of the outbreak reached by the Zooprofilattico after the first clinical suspicion and the analyzes carried out in a herd of Tertenia Ogliastra.

    Are immediately taken protective measures required by health protocols and around the area, within a radius of 4 km has been strengthened entomological surveillance.

    La Prima Pagina

    SCHMALLENBERG VIRUS, THE FIRST CONFIRMED CASE IN OGLIASTRA. TWO SUSPECTS IN SASSARI

    Institute zooprofilattico of Sardinia has found in Ogliastra, in a herd of Tertenia , the first case of Schmallenberg virus (SBV ), disease identified in Germany last year that can 'hit sheep, cattle and goats. Two more suspected cases have been reported in the territory of the ASL of Sassari in as many sheep Mores and Sassari.La confirmation of the first confirmed case in the island and 'arrived this morning from Cesme-Reference Centre of exotic diseases of Teramo.

    Already 'taken protective measures and health protocols and animals from the affected were subjected to new tests. Within a radius of four kilometers around breeding and 'been strengthened surveillance for the presence entomology insect vector, C. imicola, whose presence and 'Ogliastra favored by high temperatures this month. The Schmallenberg virus is named after the German town where it was isolated for the first time in affected animals and causes fever, decreased milk production, involvement of the genital sphere of pregnant animals, fetuses, stillbirths, birth defects and miscarriages.

    Radiopress



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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Germany: current Information on Schmallenberg virus

    last updated November 20, 2012

    As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

    In Germany animals from 1951 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus so far.

    The cases occurred in 1026 cattle holdings, 877 sheep holdings and 48 goat holdings.


    Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (269 cattle, 273 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (226 cattle, 143 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (123 cattle, 137 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (111 cattle, 102 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 51 cattle, 43 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (40 cattle, 25 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 21 sheep holdings), Thuringia (28 cattle, 31 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (19 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (2 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (109 cattle, 23 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (10 cattle holdings, 36 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (12 cattle, 10 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).

    FLI

    Link to updated map

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    machinetranslation

    Norway: antibodies to Schmallenberg virus detected in milk

    Published: 11/14/2012

    The Veterinary Institute found antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in milk samples from cattle herds in eastern Norway. Detection of antibodies means that the animal has been infected by the virus at one time or another. Schmallenberg virus is not contagious to humans. It is not dangerous to drink milk or eat meat from animals that are infected.

    25. October this year, the National Veterinary Institute that Schmallenberg virus was detected in Norway for the first time. The virus was found in biting midges. When biting midges sucking blood from infected animals can transmit the virus to other animals they suck blood from. The virus can cause brief illness in cattle and sheep. Animals that are infected early in pregnancy may have babies that are stillborn or who have severe deformities.

    Not dangerous to drink milk or eat meat

    Now, antibodies against the virus detected in samples of milk from Norway. The samples are examined as part of a monitoring program that FSA and Veterinary Institute collaborate. It is not dangerous to drink milk or eat meat from animals in the herds milk comes from ..

    Mapping the extent

    Schmallenberg is not considered a dangerous disease, but may have implications for those engaged in livestock. Veterinary Institute and the FSA are now working to examine milk from throughout southern Norway to get a picture of the spread. Currently there are 532 milk samples examined, and of these 72 samples were positive. Veterinary Institute, believes the results from the remaining 1700 samples have been received will be ready within the next week. FSA is now underway to probe into some of the herds who delivered milk that contains antibodies against the virus.


    Read more: Mattilsynet



    More details (in Norwegian).

    .

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    From the United Kingdom

    Mystery surrounds calf and lamb losses

    Rhian Price

    Friday 16 November 2012

    Mystery surrounds pregnancy scanning results, which show potentially devastating numbers of calf and lamb losses on UK farms.

    Livestock producers face early lambing losses as high as two-thirds on some farms, suggest initial results. Many scanners are reporting barren ewes, failed pregnancies or dead foetuses. Cattle losses are almost as bad in some places.

    There is a "strong suspicion" that the Schmallenberg virus could be to blame, say some vets. But other causes, such as poor nutrition following a year of extreme wet weather, have been cited by other vets and animal health experts.

    John Barnes, a scanner in the north east of England, told Farmers Weekly he had recorded problems in about two-thirds of 10,000 ewes across 80 flocks. One farm later tested positive with the Schmallenberg virus, which can cause death and deformity in unborn livestock.

    Cattle scans revealed up to 50% of 4,000 cows scanned were showing either empty or with dead calves.


    Other operators have begun to report similar problems as scanning gets into full swing ahead of next spring's lambing season.

    In the West Midlands, scanner Phil Preece reported anomalies in about a third of 8,000 early lambing ewes examined so far this year. Mr Preece said it was a "real one-off" and he had not experienced results like it in 14 years of scanning.

    Both men said they had spoken to other scanners who reported similar issues.

    It is not known if these cases are linked to the Schmallenberg virus, but flocks at highest risk from the virus would have been those tupped in late summer or early autumn when midge activity was at its highest.

    Read more: Farmers Weekly

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Germany - Current Information on Schmallenberg virus

    last updated November 13, 2012

    As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

    In Germany animals from 1930 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus so far.

    The cases occurred in 1006 cattle holdings, 876 sheep holdings and 48 goat holdings.


    Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (269 cattle, 273 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (226 cattle, 143 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (123 cattle, 137 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (111 cattle, 102 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 51 cattle, 43 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (38 cattle, 25 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 21 sheep holdings), Thuringia (28 cattle, 31 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (19 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (2 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (92 cattle, 22 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (9 cattle holding, 36 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (12 cattle, 10 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).

    FLI

    Link to map

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Germany: current Information on Schmallenberg virus

    last updated November 6, 2012

    As of 21 May case numbers and map will be updated weekly.

    In Germany animals from 1910 holdings have been tested positive for Schmallenberg virus so far.

    The cases occurred in 988 cattle holdings, 874 sheep holdings and 48 goat holdings.


    Affected federal states are North Rhine-Westphalia (269 cattle, 273 sheep, 13 goat holdings), Lower Saxony (226 cattle, 143 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Hesse (122 cattle, 137 sheep holdings, 9 goat holdings), Schleswig-Holstein (110 cattle, 101 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Rhineland-Palatinate (1 Bison holding, 51 cattle, 43 sheep, 5 goat holdings), Baden-Wuerttemberg (35 cattle, 25 sheep, 6 goat holdings), Brandenburg (24 cattle, 21 sheep holdings), Thuringia (28 cattle, 31 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Saxony-Anhalt (18 cattle, 23 sheep, 2 goat holdings), Hamburg (2 cattle, 6 sheep holdings), Bavaria (80 cattle, 21 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saxony (9 cattle holding, 36 sheep holdings), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (12 cattle, 10 sheep holdings, 1 goat holding), Saarland (1 cattle holding, 4 sheep, 2 goat holdings) and Berlin (1 sheep holding).

    FLI

    Link to map

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    The Irish Times - Friday, November 9, 2012

    Ireland: second case of livestock virus found

    ALISON HEALY

    A second case of a newly discovered livestock disease has been confirmed.

    The first Schmallenberg virus case was confirmed by the Department of Agriculture last week following tests on a bovine foetus which came from a farm in Co Cork. This latest case was discovered on another Cork farm. A cow had aborted a foetus and a postmortem confirmed the presence of the virus.

    The Schmallenberg virus does not pose a risk to human health or have food safety implications, but if cows, sheep or goats come in contact with the virus during the early stages of pregnancy, they may subsequently abort or give birth to malformed offspring.

    The disease is thought to be spread by midges.

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    France is starting up SBV surveillance again

    France is starting up SBV surveillance again, after reports of malformed lambs in several departments in september.

    ESA will take into account actual cases of malformed offspring from September 1, 2012.

    Link to document

    Survepi

    Latest update.

    .

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    UK : Schmallenbergvirus confirmed in 429 holdings

    Tip of the iceberg? Serological evidence from several countries indicates the majority of adult cattle, sheep and goats in affected regions is positive for Schmallenbergvirus.


    1 November – Schmallenberg virus update on testing results

    UK - Schmallenberg Virus – update on testing results (figures correct as of 24 October 2012).

    Fetal malformation (1)
    Cattle Holdings - 57
    Sheep Holdings - 224

    Total - 281

    Serology (2)
    Cattle Holdings - 114
    Sheep Holdings - 13

    Total - 127

    Acute Disease (3)
    Cattle Holdings - 21


    (1) - Fetal malformation and positive SBV PCR testing to detect virus or positive SBV fetal fluid serology to detect antibody
    evidence of historical infection

    (2) - Positive SBV serology, to detect antibody evidence of historical infection in either healthy animals or clinical cases which have
    not been confirmed by tests in 1and 3.

    (3) - Clinical signs in cattle including diarrhoea and milk drop associated with rising antibody titre to SBV or positive SBV PCR
    testing for virus in blood


    DEFRA

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Schmallenberg virus : new Akabane-like virus in cattle, sheep and goats in Europe

    Second case of midge bourne livestock virus confirmed in Ireland

    Wednesday October 31 2012

    A VIRUS that causes fever in cattle and sheep was detected for the first time in Northern Ireland today, after the first case in the Republic was confirmed yesterday.

    The Department of Agriculture in Northern Ireland said tests on a malformed calf in Co Down had found traces of Schmallenberg Virus.

    Another calf from the same herd tested negative but has displayed signs consistent with those associated with the disease, the department said.

    Read more: Independent

    See also: Department of Agriculture

    County Cork in the south of Ireland

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