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Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu - H10N7 detected

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu - H10N7 detected

    Sweden: 3,000 seals killed by bird flu on west coast

    dec 16 2014

    Up to 3,000 harbour seals along Sweden's west coast may have been killed by bird flu, Swedish researchers fear.

    Authorities first received reports of dead and dying seals along the coast in April, but by the time they reached the shore many of the seals had disappeared, Swedish Radio News reports. Scientists think this is because dead seals sink, rather than float on to the land.

    Tests were carried out on some of the bodies that were recovered, and bird flu was determined as the cause of the mass deaths. At first scientists estimated that around 700 seals were hit by the epidemic, but they now believe as many as 3,000 animals could have been killed by the bug.

    The area most hit by the outbreak was the southern part of the archipelago along the west coast, south of Gothenburg and towards Halland. More money has now been allocated to look into the deaths, and Swedish researchers are now in contact with their colleagues in Denmark and Germany to try to find out if it is a wider problem.

    Radio Sweden

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  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu - H10N7 detected

    computertranslation

    Netherlands: dead seals by bird flu

    Added: Monday 17 Nov 2014

    SRRC Pieterburen and scientists at Erasmus University have found that the seals flu now prevails in the Netherlands.

    The flu caused in September and October death to 10 to 15 percent of the seal population in Germany and Denmark. The expectation is that the so-called H10N7 virus will cause as much damage to the Dutch seal population.

    Last week ten dead seals in the Dutch Wadden Sea washed ashore . A veterinarian from the SRRC in Pieterburen took samples. Scientists at Erasmus University then found that all animals had the H10N7 virus .

    vaccine
    The H10N7-virus is an influenza virus that is derived from birds. For birds, the virus is not dangerous, for seals it. There is no relationship with the current outbreak of bird flu in chickens in the village Hekendorp.

    According virologist Ab Osterhaus, head of the research team, the virus is unlikely to be dangerous to humans. Yet we are working on a vaccine. History has shown that with this type of virus must always be careful, says Osterhaus.

    NOS

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  • gsgs
    replied
    Re: Denmark and Germany: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu - H10N7 detected

    1400 dead seals meanwhile on the coast of Schleswig-Holstein
    According to Danish and German scientistis the virus was also already found in
    spring on the Swedish coast
    It's now also in Lower Saxony
    both viruses shall now be compared at Riems

    Leave a comment:


  • Gert van der Hoek
    replied
    Re: Denmark and Germany: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu? - H10N7 detected

    Date 27.10.2014

    Author Brigitte Osterath


    Hundreds of seals die of avian flu in Germany

    Hundreds of dead seals have been washing up on Germany's North Sea coast since the beginning of October. Researchers have now found the cause of death: the avian flu virus.

    Since early October, 609 dead or dying seals have been found on the coasts of the German North Sea islands of Sylt, Heligoland, Amrum and Föhr.
    "That is more than we normally find," Hendrik Brunckhorst tells DW. Brunckhorst is a biologist and spokesman for the Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea National Park, a favorite habitat for the seals.
    Typically, according to Brunckhorst, one to two thousand seals wash ashore in this part of Germany every year. Six hundred in less than a month, therefore, is indeed an "increased death rate".
    The number of unreported cases is far higher, since only a percentage of the dead animals are actually found: Most of them are lost in the oceans.

    Avian flu for seals
    National park authorities have declared that the increased death rate is due to an avian flu virus of the strain H10N7. Researchers of the University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover discovered the virus in the dead seals' bodies.

    Most of the infected animals died of pneumonia caused by bacteria, Brunckhorst says. This often occurs as a secondary ailment when the animals catch the flu virus.

    Seals around Anholt and the Danish Wadden Sea are also dying at a much higher rate than usual.
    Researchers at the Technical University in Frederiksberg in Denmark confirmed that these animals were infected with the same flu strain as the seals in Germany.

    More: DW

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  • gsgs
    replied
    Re: Denmark and Germany: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu? - H10N7 detected


    H10N7 is also confirmed in Germany

    Sylt, Helgoland, Amrum und Föhr, 500 dead seals ("sea-dogs" in German)

    ------edit 2014/11/04--------------
    now 800
    August während der Fellwechselperiode, und den damit verbundenen häufigeren Landaufenthalten der Tiere,
    Im Gegensatz zu 2013 gab es also in 2014 einen geringen Rückgang der Gesamtzahlen,
    jedoch einen sprunghaften Anstieg (21&#37 bei den Jungtieren.
    ungünstiges Wetter die
    ------------------------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • gsgs
    replied
    Re: Denmark and Germany: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu? - H10N7 detected

    domestic ducks in China. They may get anything that wild mallards
    get and then make it airborne and intermix with poultry ...

    Leave a comment:


  • AlaskaDenise
    replied
    Re: Denmark and Germany: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu? - H10N7 detected

    A GenBank search shows past seal influenza infections from: H1N1, H3N3, H3N8, H4N5, H4N6, and H7N7.

    Given this newest infections, seals carry a somewhat diverse set of influenza strains. I wonder which animals, except wild birds, carry the most configurations?

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Sweden, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands: Seal Deaths Caused by Bird Flu - H10N7 detected

    computertranslation

    Seal deaths by bird flu?

    Transnational research required on the disease outbreak

    Since the beginning of October 2014, weakened or dead seal on the beaches of the German and Danish North Sea coast increasingly found, including over 350 dead animals on the North Frisian Islands and Heligoland.

    On 10/20/14 the School of Veterinary Medicine published their findings of the dissected animals. The experts were able to prove a flu virus, its type must be defined more precisely. Their Danish colleagues identified in dead seals that were found in the Kattegat, the first time the bird flu virus H10N7. A connection with the dead seals in the North Sea is not excluded. When the influenza viruses also were not previously known in seals, the existence of these seals in the Wadden Sea is not threatened by the current course of the disease.

    Nevertheless, the re-seal death raises questions. "It is puzzling why the first diseased animals were found as in the two great distemper epidemics near the Danish island of Anholt in the Baltic," says marine mammal expert Silvia Gaus of the Wadden Sea Conservation Station. Starting from the small Baltic population of harbor seals, the disease spread from that time in the North Sea and the distemper epidemic fell victim to over 20,000 animals. Many possible causes of the epidemic were discussed at that time. The real causes could never be truly understood.

    More: http://www.schutzstation-wattenmeer....h-vogelgrippe/


    Wattenmeer or Waddensea is the name for a coastal area stretching from Denmark via Germany to the Netherlands.


    H10N7 was found in a seal in an other area with recorded seal deaths: Kattegat
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