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H5N1 in Zimbabwe ostriches?

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  • H5N1 in Zimbabwe ostriches?

    H5N1 in Zimbabwe ostriches?

    http://www.birdflubreakingnews.com/t...lu_061026.html

    H5N1 in Zimbabwe ostriches?

    Via Bird Flu Breaking News, a story that is alarming if confirmed: Zimbabwe ostriches hit by suspected avian flu. Excerpt:

    Two ostriches at a farm in Hwange, Matabeleland North, have reportedly contracted a suspected strain of the dangerous bird flu virus in the country’s second such case in recent weeks.
    Contacted by our sources for comment yesterday, Department of Veterinary Services director, Stuart Hargreaves, could not immediately confirm the outbreak. But he also could not rule it out completely as the province was on alert following a similar outbreak in nearby Victoria Falls and Livingstone in Zambia.

    “There was an outbreak in that province recently, the new suspected cases have not been reported to us, but we had some cases in Victoria Falls and Livingstone, Zambia where some birds were quarantined,” he said.


    This is the first I've heard of suspected B2B H5N1 as far south as Zimbabwe—and what's this about an earlier outbreak in Zimbabwe and yet another in Zambia? If these reports are true, it's very bad news. But I suspect it's a mercifully false alarm.

    October 25, 2006

    http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/
    Last edited by Gert van der Hoek; October 26th, 2006, 04:10 AM.
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

  • #2
    Re: H5N1 in Zimbabwe ostriches?

    Whole story:

    Ostriches hit by suspected Avian bird flu

    issue date :2006-Oct-26

    TWO ostriches at a farm in Hwange, Matabeleland North, have reportedly contracted a suspected strain of the dangerous bird flu virus in the country’s second such case in recent weeks.

    Contacted by The Daily Mirror for comment yesterday, department of Veterinary Services director, Stuart Hargreaves, could not immediately confirm the outbreak.

    But he also could not rule it out completely as the province was on alert following a similar outbreak in nearby Victoria Falls and Livingstone in Zambia.

    There was an outbreak in that province recently, the new suspected cases have not been reported to us, but we had a some cases in Victoria Falls and Livingstone, Zambia where some birds were quarantined,” he said.
    Hargreaves said he was yet to find out from officials on the ground in Hwange on the exact situation.Farmers in Hwange and Victoria Falls confirmed the suspected outbreak and are already on high alert.

    “We have reported the case to the veterinary department who promised to carry out tests to establish what it is,” said Samuel Dube who spoke by phone from Deka Mouth in Hwange.

    “I suspect one of my birds (Ostriches) has avian flu, I have called the veterinary department before I could put it down,” he said.Dube said the strain suffered by one of his birds could be avian flu, as he had seen such symptoms before on quarantined ostriches in Zambia during the recent outbreak.

    However Hargreaves downplayed the fears saying the department has intensified efforts to prevent a deadly outbreak.He said: “At the moment, the situation is calm and we have since resumed ostrich meat, chicken and eggs exports regionally, but we are monitoring any suspected cases of outbreaks.”
    Hargreaves also chairs the national taskforce on avian flu mandated to put in place all necessary measures to detect the influenza virus early.

    One way of containing the highly contagious outbreak would be tightening restrictions on the movement of poultry and poultry products across the country.

    Experts have discovered that the strain of virus killing poultry and wild birds on a wholesome scale is being carried around the world by migratory birds.
    The virus has so far only been transmitted to humans in isolated cases.
    But World Health Organisation (WHO) experts fear the virus may mutate to a form transmittable from human to human, resulting in a global epidemic threatening the lives of millions, comparable to the SARS outbreaks that hit mainly China in early 2003.

    The spread of the flu from Asia to eastern Europe and then Africa has increased chances of the virus mutating and causing a possible pandemic among humans, said UN bird flu chief David Nabarro.

    The highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu virus moved rapidly outside of Southeast Asia and spread into Europe, Eurasia, and Africa.
    The disease has been detected in 53 countries worldwide and threatens to derail significant progress made in international development.
    Globally, the disease has caused tremendous damage, slaughtering at least 220 million birds, hurting agri-business, trade, and opportunities for economic growth.

    According the WHO, avian flu has infected 247 humans in 10 countries; almost 60 per cent of these cases have been fatal.

    The national taskforce on bird flue has ruled out human infection by the virus.
    The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)’s animal products and health office based in the Italian capital, Rome, warned the disease might continue to spread despite medical research aimed at halting its progress.

    http://www.zimmirror.co.zw/dailymirr...e_type=current
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    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

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